Jump to content
SASS Wire Forum
Sign in to follow this  
Jaan

.44-40 bullet diameter question

Recommended Posts

I have a 3 year old Winchester 73 Miroku and I've been shooting Winchester Super X Cowboy Action loads and I've been very happy with the accuracy.

 

The bullets measure .426" in diameter.  Are most factory loaded ammo from different brands close to the same size?  I can't find the Winchester in bulk anymore.

 

Also, what's your favorite brand of .44-40?

 

Thank you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Howdy, Slug your barrel you will find that you can use .429 or .430 dia bullets.

Good shootin

JB Sledge

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Uberti 1860 Henry and my Marlin Cowboy both slug out to .429, so I am loading .430 bullets.  The problem with loading .430 bullets is that standard 44-40 dies are made for .427 bullets.  Powder die is easy as you can use a 44 Special expander.  The crimp die is a bigger problem as it will not properly crimp a case with a .430 bullet loaded.

 

I have a friend that is going to give me a Lee Factory crimp die to try. Most people are using a Redding profile crimp die. Right now they are pretty scarce as the Redding factory is closed due to the Chinese Flu.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m loading .429 bullets.  Once I changed to the Redding profile die, 99.9% of my crimp issues disappeared.  I still check chamber check every round, but the failure rate is now extremely low.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The .429/.430 bullets shoot great in the modern replica barrels, and that's all I use since I also load .44 Special, but I have to be careful what brass I put them in.  Starline and WInchester will chamber fine in our rifles, 3-D, R-P, and BHA, not so much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got seven rifles in 44/40 the bores slug out between .427 and .429, I load them all with .429 bullets with good results.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think others have caught that you are referring to ammo you can buy rather than custom reload. I reload my own 44-40, but if I was buying ammo, I would include Georgia Arms in my search. I have some of their ammo and measured the bullets at .428. I got some leading and then checked the throats and started to reload .430...problem solved. My RCBS Cowboy dies with a 44 Special/Magnum expander insert do the job nicely. I always note that RCBS 44-40 dies are not carbide and require that case lube be used. The other calibers that are not for necked cases are carbide.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I am one of those that didn’t pay attention to the original question...

I have used some Winchester and a lot of Black Hills factory .44-40 over the years when we used to hold classes, and never noticed any difference in function or accuracy between the two.  
I have heard good things about Cowboy Choice ammunition but have not tried any personally.

It looks like you would need to call the manufacturers to determine bullet diameter as I don’t see it mentioned on web sites, but I would expect .426/.428 to be the standard for this.

Edited by Crisco
Typo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Georgia Arms makes excellent 44-40 cartridges at a reasonable price.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Jaan said:

I have a 3 year old Winchester 73 Miroku and I've been shooting Winchester Super X Cowboy Action loads and I've been very happy with the accuracy.

 

The bullets measure .426" in diameter.  Are most factory loaded ammo from different brands close to the same size?  I can't find the Winchester in bulk anymore.

 

Also, what's your favorite brand of .44-40?

 

Thank you!

 

All Winchester factory ammo (Only Two Options) is .426" Winchester's JSP is actually .4255" and has been since it's inception. I have yet to personally inspect Winchester's current 225gr lead bullets used for CAS. .426" does not surprise me. Nor do I have a vast supply of other "original" 44-40 bullets from other manufatures other than Remington. Remington JSP bullets are .426".

The true "original" 44-40 bullet has a diameter of .427ish for lead and .4255" for Jacketed with some original lead bullets coming in at .424". Barrel bores range from .424" to .431" in reported "original" rifles.

Most modern bores are .429" but some by Winchester are reported to be .427". Most claim that modern barrels are simply 44 Magnum barrels but that is not true. Most 44 Magnum barrels have a 1:20" twist while the 44-40 barrel is typically 1:36". The 44 Magnum also uses the .429" bullets and the 1:20" twist is for 240gr bullets while the 1:36" is for 200gr bullets.

Today's most popular lead bullet used in the 44-40 is typically cast commercially from a Magma Engineering mold. They have two options, bevel base and flat base. These two options are broken down into three more options, bullet weights. Commercial casters like Oregon Trail calls them by their custom name.


Magma Engineering


44-40 "Cowboy"
Diameter .427"
cast to .429"-.430"
44-40-200-RNF-BB

44-40-225-RNF-BB

44-40-240-RNF-BB

 

44-40 "Cowboy"
Diameter .427"
cast to .429"-.430"
44-40-180-RNF-FB

44-40-210-RNF-FB

44-40-225-RNF-FB

 

However, these are not even true 44-40 "Profile" bullets due to the protruding forward driving band.

Original 44-40 lead bullets are pretty much what Winchester manufactures today but are not offered as reloading components. Their lead bullets are swaged bullets, not cast. Even Winchester's early handloading components were swaged bullets but did offer casting tools. Winchester 44-40 Loading/Casting Tools

Lyman basically replicated early Winchester profile bullets but the design changed slightly to what we today call the 427098. Lyman 44-40 Loading/Casting Tools

 

With the different barrel bores and custom molds available....customizing your loads is also an option. Custom Bullet Molds

 

Crimping for each bullet can also be testy but rewarding when done properly. 44-40 Profile Crimp  It is best to crimp the bullet per crimp design the bullet offers.

If someone is having problems with roll crimping...Roll Crimp Issues and Crumpled Cases

 

44-40 Web Site

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For years now I have been using .429-.430" bullets in Winchester brass, in OM Ruger Vaquero's, a Navy Arms (Uberty manufacture) M1860 Henry rifle, and a Rossi M65 ('92).  I use RCBS dies, (regular, not Cowboy dies), with the expander plug replaced with a .44 Magnum plug.  The roll crimp die works fine. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

0.429" sized Brinnell 8 hardness bullets for Uberti 73s.    Big lube groove(s) for black powder use.  Round nose flat point with no forward driving band.     My mold choice - Old West Bullet Molds, # 431-205.  Works well with Starline and Winchester cases.   Pretty similar to 43-215 from Accurate Molds, but 10 grains lighter due to shorter groove section.

 

My favorite brand of ammunition?   The ammo that I load.  :lol:   Suits me to a T, or else I have words with the production crew.  :o

 

Good luck, GJ

 

 

 

 
Edited by Garrison Joe, SASS #60708

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Sedalia Dave said:

My Uberti 1860 Henry and my Marlin Cowboy both slug out to .429, so I am loading .430 bullets.  The problem with loading .430 bullets is that standard 44-40 dies are made for .427 bullets.  Powder die is easy as you can use a 44 Special expander.  The crimp die is a bigger problem as it will not properly crimp a case with a .430 bullet loaded.

 

I have a friend that is going to give me a Lee Factory crimp die to try. Most people are using a Redding profile crimp die. Right now they are pretty scarce as the Redding factory is closed due to the Chinese Flu.

I too would like to get hold of the Redding profile die, had an order in for 9 months, hopefully I have found one in New Zealand. I use the lee factory crimp die for BP but want the Redding for smokeless.

Keep safe & well SD..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I’m the one black sheep here. I have tried .429s but would get too many hangers due to tight chambers in 2 of my 3 rifles and one of my pistols, even using my 44 Spl expander plug. So Went to .428 bullet in both smokeless bullets and Big Lubes from Slim for my BP loads. Problem solved. Targets shot at 100 yards with both diameters showed no appreciable difference in accuracy. And yes 4 out of 5 of my bores slugged at .429. I’m using bhn of 12 in smokeless bullets and Slim’s bhn 8 bullets in BP. I believe those soft bullets “bump up” to obturate the bore as I get decent groups with no leading, also I have gone to powder coating in the smokeless rounds which helps prevent leading.

 

PS; Jaan, I don’t buy factory. Can’t help with that. And, also one of my .429 barreled rifles is a 44WCF MIROKU ‘73 and it shoots .428 bullets fine in smokeless.

Edited by Bull Skinner

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Savvy Jack said:

 

All Winchester factory ammo (Only Two Options) is .426" Winchester's JSP is actually .4255" and has been since it's inception. I have yet to personally inspect Winchester's current 225gr lead bullets used for CAS. .426" does not surprise me. Nor do I have a vast supply of other "original" 44-40 bullets from other manufatures other than Remington. Remington JSP bullets are .426".

The true "original" 44-40 bullet has a diameter of .427ish for lead and .4255" for Jacketed with some original lead bullets coming in at .424". Barrel bores range from .424" to .431" in reported "original" rifles.

Most modern bores are .429" but some by Winchester are reported to be .427". Most claim that modern barrels are simply 44 Magnum barrels but that is not true. Most 44 Magnum barrels have a 1:20" twist while the 44-40 barrel is typically 1:36". The 44 Magnum also uses the .429" bullets and the 1:20" twist is for 240gr bullets while the 1:36" is for 200gr bullets.

Today's most popular lead bullet used in the 44-40 is typically cast commercially from a Magma Engineering mold. They have two options, bevel base and flat base. These two options are broken down into three more options, bullet weights. Commercial casters like Oregon Trail calls them by their custom name.


Magma Engineering


44-40 "Cowboy"
Diameter .427"
cast to .429"-.430"
44-40-200-RNF-BB

44-40-225-RNF-BB

44-40-240-RNF-BB

 

44-40 "Cowboy"
Diameter .427"
cast to .429"-.430"
44-40-180-RNF-FB

44-40-210-RNF-FB

44-40-225-RNF-FB

 

However, these are not even true 44-40 "Profile" bullets due to the protruding forward driving band.

Original 44-40 lead bullets are pretty much what Winchester manufactures today but are not offered as reloading components. Their lead bullets are swaged bullets, not cast. Even Winchester's early handloading components were swaged bullets but did offer casting tools. Winchester 44-40 Loading/Casting Tools

Lyman basically replicated early Winchester profile bullets but the design changed slightly to what we today call the 427098. Lyman 44-40 Loading/Casting Tools

 

With the different barrel bores and custom molds available....customizing your loads is also an option. Custom Bullet Molds

 

Crimping for each bullet can also be testy but rewarding when done properly. 44-40 Profile Crimp  It is best to crimp the bullet per crimp design the bullet offers.

If someone is having problems with roll crimping...Roll Crimp Issues and Crumpled Cases

 

44-40 Web Site

Thanks..some really interesting info there...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Ya gotta love the original 44-40 bullet profile!

Custom 43-214A 220gr sized to .428" and a standard Winchester .4255" JSP using the Redding profile crimp for both design crimps. Tappered profile crimp for the lead and the "U" crimp for the JSP all from the same crimp die. Smokeless powder

78926364_567099084077593_2180765710353956864_n.jpg

 

 

The Redding Profile die forms a very nice crimp into the lead that creates a "ledge" that sticks out past the case mouth which also helps prevent telescoping. Somewhat forms it's own crimp groove.

77221330_1744354482623119_8837394364029206528_n - Copy.jpg

77221330_1744354482623119_8837394364029206528_n.jpg

CaseRetension.jpg

 

 

 

To prevent the bullet from telescoping down into the case from the rifle's mag tube spring pressure, it is very important to resize the case neck to the smallest available when using small diameter (.4255") JSP bullets. When the bullet is seated, it is such a snug fit that it expands the case neck and leaves a "wasp waist" under the bullet base. This can also be done with lead bullets, however, but as can be seen in the aforementioned photo, the Redding Profile die forms a very nice crimp into the lead that creates a "ledge" that sticks out past the case mouth which also helps prevent telescoping. 

80567288_2409277745847708_2982056129313374208_n.jpg

 

 

Dissected 43-214A bullet shows how the Redding Profile crimp formed it's own crimp groove and how small the diameter is at the crimp.

67618028_1231029147077666_6265527011851108352_n.jpg

A bullet lineup.jpg

Edited by Savvy Jack
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All very good information on the 44wcf.. and a special thanks to those who take the time to add pics and graphics during this discussion.

 

The one thing that has always mystified me is the trouble folks have loading the 38wcf and 44wcf ..in particular the case buckle problem as well as the special dies etc folks seem to need to solve the problems

 

I dumb and happily load both of the above calibers 1000/per cal at a time on my Dillon RL550 ..and amazingly I use plain Jane RCBS dies on the above with zero loading problens ..zero magazine problems ..zero feed problems in rifles and no set back or bullet jump in my Single Actions ..

 

With that said ..and I'm not knocking anyone's ideas here ..me thinks the secret is seat the bullet separately from the crimp ..and I guess it's just lucky that RCBS set does in fact seat in one station and crimp in the last and  seems compatible to both of the above calibers

 

I do use an original 1892 Winchester carbines in both calibers for my "go in the brush" mode when bucks lock down ..the loads are very hot ..and very effective ..the result is however brass stretch ..so those I meticulously keep separated and trim as needed ..other wise the dreaded wrinkle will eventually catch up with you ..I just don't have brass stretch with my normal SASS loads

 

Bear

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Howdy

 

My favorite brand of 44-40 ammo is my own Black Powder loads. There , I got that out of the way.

 

On 4/18/2020 at 9:20 AM, Sedalia Dave said:

Most people are using a Redding profile crimp die. Right now they are pretty scarce as the Redding factory is closed due to the Chinese Flu.

 

I don't know where you got your information about what crimp die most people are using for 44-40, I have been using the Lee Factory Crimp die for a bazillion years and it works fine for me. Let me be more specific, when loading 44-40 with Black Powder it really does not matter what shape the crimp is or how it is formed, because the solid plug of Black Powder behind the bullet will prevent the bullets from telescoping back into the case when the follower in the rifle magazine slams them all backwards every time a round is stripped out of the magazine. On the rare occasion, probably haven't done it for close to 20 years now, when I load 44-40 with Smokeless, bullets can telescope back into the case when slammed backwards by the magazine follower.

 

Anyway, let's see, I have five rifles chambered for 44-40. When I started this game I was using an original Winchester Model 1892 that left the factory in 1897 and the groove diameter was .427. I was using .427 diameter bullets for my Smokeless 44-40 ammo. When I switched to BP I was shooting an Uberti replica Model 1873, made in the 1980s, and its groove diameter was also .427. At that time I experimented with bullets .427, .428, and .429 in diameter. All shot fine out of the Uberti '73. However, as has been mentioned, because of the relatively tight chamber of the Uberti rifle, 44-40 ammo loaded with .429 bullets needed a little bit of an extra shove to chamber because the .429 bullets had expanded the necks slightly. We all know that bullet diameter should be .001 or so larger than groove diameter, but .427 bullets shot fine in the .427 grooves of that Uberti '73. I also have an ancient Marlin Model 1894 chambered for 44-40, and its groove diameter is .427. About ten years ago I started shooting a modern (ten years ago) Uberti 1860 Henry, and its groove diameter is .429. Not wanting to be loading different ammo for different rifles, I started shooting .428 diameter bullets in the Henry. They shoot very well and it is very accurate even though the bullet diameter is .001 shy of groove diameter. Interestingly enough, my 5th 44-40 rifle is a Winchester Model 1892 Saddle Ring Carbine made in 1918, and its groove diameter is also .429. Go figure. So these days I load .428 bullets in all my 44-40 rifles and they shoot fine whether groove diameter is .427 or .428.

 

Anyway, the only bullet I use for 44-40 is the Big Lube Mav-Dutchman 200 grain bullet. In this photo the round on the left is one of my 44-40s, shown with the 200 grain Big Lube Mav-Dutchman bullet, both with and without bullet lube. The round on the right is one of my 45 Colt loads, pictured with the Big Lube PRS 250 grain bullet, both with and without bullet lube.

 

pmHpBNt7j

 

 

 

 

By the way, I use those same .428 diameter Mav-Duthman bullets when I load 44 Russian for my antique S&W New Model Number Threes. No idea what their groove diameter is because S&W used five groove rifling and it is tough to get an accurate groove diameter reading with five grooves.

 

poyQP0cpj

 

pnIVU3B0j

 

 

 

 

My 44-40 Merwin Hulbert also has five groove rifling, so I don't really know exactly what its groove diameter is. But it does not seem to mind the .428 bullets.

 

poJSQPHVj

 

pnwLij08j

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Broken Bear, SASS#58418 said:

I dumb and happily load both of the above calibers 1000/per cal at a time on my Dillon RL550 ..and amazingly I use plain Jane RCBS dies on the above with zero loading problens ..zero magazine problems ..zero feed problems in rifles and no set back or bullet jump in my Single Actions ..

 

Bear

 

Problem solved, everyone having problems just needs to get a Dillon 550 and RCBS dies, seat and crimp in two steps.

Thanks for the "idea" Bear ;-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Howdy Again

 

That Savvy Jack sure takes nice photos, don't he? I think they are maybe even better than mine.

 

Regarding needing a special crimp die: I too load all my cowboy ammo on a progressive press, a Hornady Lock & Load AP. I usually load 200 rounds at a time, then I get bored and do something else. I just wanted to post another photo. By the way, the dummy 50 caliber BMG round is excellent for smoothing out case mouths that have been stepped on and squished a little bit.

 

poGWMNERj

 

 

 

 

When I was loading Smokeless 44-40 I too used a standard RCBS die set, not the fancy cowboy set. I was using the standard 3 die set, I was not using a separate crimp die. I always say when loading 44-40 you have to slow down a bit, AND you have to set your dies more precisely than for instance for the more forgiving 45 Colt round. With careful adjustment of my dies, I was able to turn out good ammo seating and crimping in one step.

 

It was when I started loading BP in 44-40 that I realized I needed to crimp with a separate die. The reason is, a little bit of soft BP compatible bullet lube would always rub out of the lube groove and wind up in the area of the crimp. The standard seating/crimp die of the RCBS set did not squeeze the brass tight enough to displace the small amount of errant lube that got in the crimp groove, so I had bulgy crimps. That is when I started crimping separately with the LEE FCD. Its split ring approach to crimping squeezes the brass tighter than the RCBS crimp groove and squeezes any errant soft, BP lube away from the crimp. I do the same with 38-40, because it also has very thin brass at the neck, and the fancy RCBS Cowboy dies that I use do not squeeze errant lube out of the crimp groove.

 

For all other cartridges, I seat the bullet and crimp in one step.

Edited by Driftwood Johnson, SASS #38283

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Savvy Jack said:

 

Problem solved, everyone having problems just needs to get a Dillon 550 and RCBS dies, seat and crimp in two steps.

Thanks for the "idea" Bear ;-)

Well that's one interpretation Pard ..I used the 550 Dillon to abbreviate this explanation ..A four station machine or a 4 pass process is working for me in that station #1 is size/decap/cap ..station #2 is case mouth function and powder drop ..station #3 is bullet seat ..station #4 is crimp

 

RL550 Dillon has 11 characters and  I think most folks have seen real life or in pictures a 550 and it's configuration ..the above has about 160 characters

 

The RCBS dies just happen to come set up for a 4 pass process ...or maybe they know what they are doing ..more likely the later than the former

 

Bear:D

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Bear, I am a firm believer in good quality equipment vs "Wal-Mart" quality equipment. Precise alignment etc.

Driftwood...lol...thanks!  I tell ya, you just can't beat Dick Dasterdly's image.gif.fc87afeed7dd4986fe836c802ebf2294.gifimage.gif.54a809ae93e8a214224c239bd671f61e.gifBig Lube bullet molds designed by guys like MAV Dutchman, Snakebite, and Pigeon Roost Slim for CAS...black powder or smokeless. Although I don't shoot CAS any more, I still use his black powder lube for both bullet lube and occasional case lube...still got a few tubes left from years ago.

 

Jaan, if you decide to look at a 44 bullet for CAS, consider the Big Lube if you choose not to get the "Magma" option. There are certainly several more options out there but you can mass purchase the two I mention from folks right here on this forum.

RCBS Green Machine, modified for the 44-40, it's a love/hate relationship!
 

67193274_1226965837483997_3140726965850341376_n.jpg

closeup.png

Edited by Savvy Jack

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the wonderful info guys, if I had started this game now I would only shoot 44-40 in black or white. Presently I use my .45's for smokeless & 44-40 for real BP  but when I use smokeless in the 44-40 I am not having complete success with a few still  telescoping back in..I use the Lee FCD. That will change shortly as I will use the Redding profile crimp die. I use .427 bullets    [ 200 grain ] with no problems in the OMV & '73 Uberti.

Would the 160 grain be okay to load for  smokeless in  the 44-40 ?..I ask because that is what I load for the .45 & I do like that bullet . I cast all my own with the Magma Caster.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

THANK YOU EVERYONE!!!  I honestly think these are the friendliest and most informative forums on the internet.  There's certainly a lot to digest here.  I might print this thread out and bind it as a workshop reference book. (c:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

 

    Looks like Driftwood has an original MAV Dutchman mold, as it has that funny ridge on the front of the nose.

Edited by Springfield Slim SASS #24733
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Springfield Slim SASS #24733 said:

Savvy; you mean Dick Dastardly's Big Lube bullet molds. They were all designed by other SASS shooters, like MAV Dutchman, Snakebite, and Pigeon Roost Slim. Dick then  did a great job of making them accessible to all with his mold company. 

    Looks like Driftwood has an original MAV Dutchman mold, as it has that funny ridge on the front of the nose.

 

Absolutely, I shall correct the error.

Jaan. Springfield is also a great caster!!!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Springfield Slim SASS #24733 said:

Looks like Driftwood has an original MAV Dutchman mold, as it has that funny ridge on the front of the nose.

 

Come on Slim, check your records. You should know I have been buying all my Big Lube bullets from you for a number of years now. I have not looked it up, but those photos with the ridge on the bullets must be from when I was casting my own bullets with my old Big Lube molds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Driftwood Johnson, SASS #38283 said:

MAV Dutchman mold, as it has that funny ridge on the front of the nose.

 

You mean funny like on my OWBM mold? 

 

 

Good luck, GJ

OWBM 205 bullet.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Here is the cartridge profile comparison with the 220gr 43-214A and an original 200gr bullet pulled from an unheadstamped pre-1880's case. The original cartridge shows very little evidence of a taper as so does a new Starline case. I typically resize all of my new brass before using with anything smaller than a .428".

 

67618028_1231029147077666_6265527011851108352_n.jpg

Pulled bullet on right shows diameter after crimping

 

 

 

 

67701754_1229711647209416_951701165802782720_n.jpg

Original bullet on right shows crimp "ring". Post crimp diameter .410"

 

 

And the Big Lube bullets I used. First using Slim's cast (dark lube) then my own. NOE Mold 432-200 cast to 217gr on each end.

DSCF1966a.jpg

Edited by Savvy Jack

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I think he means funny like the bullet at the bottom right in this photo.

 

poyQP0cpj

 

 

 

 

Or like the ridges on top of the Mav-Dutchmans at the left in this photo

pmHpBNt7j

 

 

 

 

No idea how old these photos are, but I took them some time ago, probably before I started buying my bullets from Slim.

 

 

 

Here are some of Slim's Mav-Dutchman bullets. No funny lip on the top.

 

pn9NkQBvj

 

 

 

 

Hmmm....here are some 44-40s and 44 Russians loaded with Slim's bullets. Hmmmm.....they have that funny ridge on top. Maybe the bullet seater is doing that when it shoves them into the cases. Hmmm....never noticed that before. Oh well, it does not seem to hurt my accuracy.

 

pnWgb5lWj

Edited by Driftwood Johnson, SASS #38283

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, Driftwood Johnson, SASS #38283 said:

Maybe the bullet seater is doing that

 

I'd bet big on that being where the funniness comes from.   Don't know why anyone would want an irregularity like that in the mold cavity!  

Good luck, GJ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have 4 wore out MAV moulds. The first 2 are original moulds bought from the MAV Dutchman, the others are from later batches. My current 2 working molds are the newest from DD, and are a bit different than the originals..

  One of these days I am going to go through the original 4 moulds and see if I can salvage them. The moulds themselves are probably OK, it's just the sprue pivot and lockdown bolts and the alighment pins that give out. I doubt LEE ever planned on anyone putting a couple hundred thousand bullets through each of these moulds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That ridge IS in the mould cavities of the first batch of moulds. Just the way they turned out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cherry was probably dinged.

GJ

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just dug out my old Mav-Dutchman mold. It appears those are radii where the metplat meets the ogive, not a groove. So my seating plug must be mishaping my bullets slightly.  Interestingly enough, the shipping label is still on the box. It shipped October 29. 2003.

 

po9BAqBHj

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.