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Subdeacon Joe

Welding

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Posted (edited)

Guy can't seem to run a straight bead.  :D

 

Image may contain: possible text that says 'So, you think you can weld?'

 

Beautiful piece of work. (no, I can't.  My beads anymore look like chicken guano.)

Edited by Subdeacon Joe
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I can stick two pieces of metal together where they probably won't come loose. Does that count?

JHC :lol:

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I haven’t welded in so long I wouldn’t even bother trying to do anything even close to that. 

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Somebody's been through Wood Badge....  :rolleyes:

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Yep, I recognize the Wood Badge symbolism.  

 

But no, I can't weld.  

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At Summer Camp (and I don't recall if this was every meal or not, but Summer Camp was many many years ago) a member of staff would eat with you. You got a recipe - this is what you will cook for supper - and the cook and his helper went down to the mess hall and drew the food. And it needed to be completed at the official supper time, when the staff member would show up to eat with you, and grade you on how well you did.

 

My scoutmaster was telling us one day that when he took Wood Badge they did the same thing. They had supper ready one night, and then someone realized :o they had forgotten to make coffee.

 

Quickly grabbing the coffee pot, the cook threw a handful of coffee in, and then poured in the water from cooking the potatoes (which was still hot). Stuck it on the fire, and about 2 minutes later when the staff guy come wandering up, took it off the fire, pulled a burning branch out of the fire and stuck it down in the coffee pot (whoooosh [much steam]), and set the pot on the table.

 

He said the staff guy did not complain, but nobody wanted a second cup that night. :rolleyes:

 

 

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Posted (edited)

I do gorilla welding...ugly but strong.

Edited by LawMan Mark, SASS #57095L
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14 hours ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

Guy can't seem to run a straight bead.  :D

 

Image may contain: possible text that says 'So, you think you can weld?'

 

Beautiful piece of work. (no, I can't.  My beads anymore look like chicken guano.)

And that children,  is why J B WELD was made.  

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4 hours ago, Capt. James H. Callahan said:

Whatsa Wood Badge?

JHC

 

"Wood Badge" has been called 'Advanced Leadership Training' for Scouters (adult Scout leaders).

 

I tell folks that it's like every motivational, team building, "rah-rah" training thing that every boss you've ever had has made you go to - all rolled up in one, in a Boy Scouts environment.  Different, though, in that everyone is there because they WANT to be - no one makes 'em go.

 

Six days and four nights (now reduced to five days :() of instruction, participation, and hard work.  At the conclusion, you leave with a list of five tasks (Ticket, or Tickets) to be completed within 18 months.  Upon their completion, there is a "beading ceremony," where the successful candidate is presented a set of two wooden beads on a leather thong and a taupe neckerchief with a patch of Maclaren tartan on the back.  The beads are replicas of those from a necklace that Robert Baden-Powell liberated from the Zulu chief, Dinuzulu kaCetshwayo.  The Maclaren tartan honors William de Bois Maclaren, who donated the Gilwell Park training grounds to the Scouts.  

 

The candidates earn these "badges."

 

There's a great deal of history and lore with Wood Badge ~ 'way too much to present here.  But a couple of items are that upon entering the course, the candidate is assigned to a Patrol, named after one of eight animals, and will forever be identified as that "critter."

 

                  I am a Fox.                                                   The universally recognized Wood Badge symbol is the Axe in Log, as depicted on my belt buckle.

1975896980_Fox-Smaller-Copy.jpg.e663dc0c7c20b0c70c2779bba0b7af96.jpg                                                                      BOY SCOUTS Belt Buckle LOG Wood Badge AXE

 

 

Sounds really corny, but it's actually pretty cool.  And a TON of fun (but two tons of work!)   ^_^

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Hardpan Curmudgeon SASS #8967 said:

 

"Wood Badge" has been called 'Advanced Leadership Training' for Scouters (adult Scout leaders).

 

I tell folks that it's like every motivational, team building, "rah-rah" training thing that every boss you've ever had has made you go to - all rolled up in one, in a Boy Scouts environment.  Different, though, in that everyone is there because they WANT to be - no one makes 'em go.

 

Six days and four nights (now reduced to five days :() of instruction, participation, and hard work.  At the conclusion, you leave with a list of five tasks (Ticket, or Tickets) to be completed within 18 months.  Upon their completion, there is a "beading ceremony," where the successful candidate is presented a set of two wooden beads on a leather thong and a taupe neckerchief with a patch of Maclaren tartan on the back.  The beads are replicas of those from a necklace that Robert Baden-Powell liberated from the Zulu chief, Dinuzulu kaCetshwayo.  The Maclaren tartan honors William de Bois Maclaren, who donated the Gilwell Park training grounds to the Scouts.  

 

The candidates earn these "badges."

 

There's a great deal of history and lore with Wood Badge ~ 'way too much to present here.  But a couple of items are that upon entering the course, the candidate is assigned to a Patrol, named after one of eight animals, and will forever be identified as that "critter."

 

                  I am a Fox.                                                   The universally recognized Wood Badge symbol is the Axe in Log, as depicted on my belt buckle.

1975896980_Fox-Smaller-Copy.jpg.e663dc0c7c20b0c70c2779bba0b7af96.jpg                                                                      BOY SCOUTS Belt Buckle LOG Wood Badge AXE

 

 

Sounds really corny, but it's actually pretty cool.  And a TON of fun (but two tons of work!)   ^_^

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And you I assume are a Fox?

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Oh poo I see it now

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10 hours ago, Hardpan Curmudgeon SASS #8967 said:

 

"Wood Badge" has been called 'Advanced Leadership Training' for Scouters (adult Scout leaders).

 

I tell folks that it's like every motivational, team building, "rah-rah" training thing that every boss you've ever had has made you go to - all rolled up in one, in a Boy Scouts environment.  Different, though, in that everyone is there because they WANT to be - no one makes 'em go.

 

Six days and four nights (now reduced to five days :() of instruction, participation, and hard work.  At the conclusion, you leave with a list of five tasks (Ticket, or Tickets) to be completed within 18 months.  Upon their completion, there is a "beading ceremony," where the successful candidate is presented a set of two wooden beads on a leather thong and a taupe neckerchief with a patch of Maclaren tartan on the back.  The beads are replicas of those from a necklace that Robert Baden-Powell liberated from the Zulu chief, Dinuzulu kaCetshwayo.  The Maclaren tartan honors William de Bois Maclaren, who donated the Gilwell Park training grounds to the Scouts.  

 

The candidates earn these "badges."

 

There's a great deal of history and lore with Wood Badge ~ 'way too much to present here.  But a couple of items are that upon entering the course, the candidate is assigned to a Patrol, named after one of eight animals, and will forever be identified as that "critter."

 

                  I am a Fox.                                                   The universally recognized Wood Badge symbol is the Axe in Log, as depicted on my belt buckle.

1975896980_Fox-Smaller-Copy.jpg.e663dc0c7c20b0c70c2779bba0b7af96.jpg                                                                      BOY SCOUTS Belt Buckle LOG Wood Badge AXE

 

 

Sounds really corny, but it's actually pretty cool.  And a TON of fun (but two tons of work!)   ^_^

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks. I was a Webelos for a very short time, was like 2 other boys in my troop. I did get a Bobcat badge I think it was. Our troop kinda folded. I grew up outdoors-ing so it was a bit of a bore.

JHC

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22 hours ago, Capt. James H. Callahan said:

Whatsa Wood Badge?

JHC

 

Wood Badge is the most senior training for adult leaders in the Boy Scouts of America.  It was created in the early 1930s by Robert Baden-Powell himself, the founder of the Scouting movement.  The training is international.  The first Wood Badge training occurred at a Scouting reservation North of London at a place called Gilwell Park.  I've been there, so I joke that I can add "Haji" to my name, because I've made the pilgrimage.  The ax-in-log depicted in the original post is the international symbol for Wood Badge.

 

By the way, Scouters, if anyone wants to see pics of Gilwell Park, let me know.  

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22 hours ago, Alpo said:

My scoutmaster was telling us one day that when he took Wood Badge they did the same thing. 

 

Yes, we still do!

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17 hours ago, Hardpan Curmudgeon SASS #8967 said:

 

"Wood Badge" has been called 'Advanced Leadership Training' for Scouters (adult Scout leaders).

 

I tell folks that it's like every motivational, team building, "rah-rah" training thing that every boss you've ever had has made you go to - all rolled up in one, in a Boy Scouts environment.  Different, though, in that everyone is there because they WANT to be - no one makes 'em go.

 

Six days and four nights (now reduced to five days :() of instruction, participation, and hard work.  At the conclusion, you leave with a list of five tasks (Ticket, or Tickets) to be completed within 18 months.  Upon their completion, there is a "beading ceremony," where the successful candidate is presented a set of two wooden beads on a leather thong and a taupe neckerchief with a patch of Maclaren tartan on the back.  The beads are replicas of those from a necklace that Robert Baden-Powell liberated from the Zulu chief, Dinuzulu kaCetshwayo.  The Maclaren tartan honors William de Bois Maclaren, who donated the Gilwell Park training grounds to the Scouts.  

 

The candidates earn these "badges."

 

There's a great deal of history and lore with Wood Badge ~ 'way too much to present here.  But a couple of items are that upon entering the course, the candidate is assigned to a Patrol, named after one of eight animals, and will forever be identified as that "critter."

 

                  I am a Fox.                                                   The universally recognized Wood Badge symbol is the Axe in Log, as depicted on my belt buckle.

1975896980_Fox-Smaller-Copy.jpg.e663dc0c7c20b0c70c2779bba0b7af96.jpg                                                                      BOY SCOUTS Belt Buckle LOG Wood Badge AXE

 

 

Sounds really corny, but it's actually pretty cool.  And a TON of fun (but two tons of work!)   ^_^

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hey pard, I'm a beaver!!!

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3 hours ago, Cyrus Cassidy #45437 said:

 

Hey pard, I'm a beaver!!!

 

Har!  You get to lead the singing~!!  :lol:

 

I wanna see some pictures.  :)  

 

 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Hardpan Curmudgeon SASS #8967 said:

 

Har!  You get to lead the singing~!!  :lol:

 

I wanna see some pictures.  :)  

 

 

Getting my beads while wearing a MacLaren kilt :)  The ax-and-log is visible on the right side of both pics.  Beaver patrol patch visible on the 2nd pic.

IMG_1419.jpeg

IMG_1425.jpeg

Edited by Cyrus Cassidy #45437
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When did they quit interlocking the little fingers?

 

The last time I had anything to do with Scouting, I was 19, so that was 74/5. And we still interlocked our little fingers.

 

I can easily see all four fingers on both left hands in that picture. Just a straight left-handed shake.

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7 minutes ago, Alpo said:

When did they quit interlocking the little fingers?

 

The last time I had anything to do with Scouting, I was 19, so that was 74/5. And we still interlocked our little fingers.

 

I can easily see all four fingers on both left hands in that picture. Just a straight left-handed shake.

Boy Scouts never interlocked the fingers.  You're giving away the "secret" handshake for Order of the Arrow.

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"Welding is Knitting for Men...."

 

I love to weld! Just finished a quarantine trailer I bought a couple weeks ago to give me something to do.....Lots of cutting and welding!

 

 

IMG_20200408_155148877_s.jpg

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While I teach Welding In Northern Uganda as part of our Work there I'm Not Long on Fancy ...

And Burning up that much "Rod" there would be discouraged ...

 

God bless all the Cowboys and Keep them safe ...

 

Jabez Cowboy

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2 hours ago, Cyrus Cassidy #45437 said:

Boy Scouts never interlocked the fingers.  You're giving away the "secret" handshake for Order of the Arrow.

Let's not use the word never. You were born in 76, so you could not become a scout until '87. That's almost 15 years after I got out. And we interlocked our little fingers when we shook hands.

 

I was never in OA.

 

When I was in, we were Boy Scouts of America, and there was a specific list of stuff you had to pass to go from tenderfoot to second to first.

 

When I got out it had become Scouting USA, and they had come up with belt loops (which was basically merit badges for younger kids).

 

There was a major change in the way scouting was done in about 1974.

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Posted (edited)
4 minutes ago, Alpo said:

Let's not use the word never. You were born in 76, so you could not become a scout until '87. That's almost 15 years after I got out. And we interlocked our little fingers when we shook hands.

 

I was never in OA.

 

When I was in, we were Boy Scouts of America, and there was a specific list of stuff you had to pass to go from tenderfoot to second to first.

 

When I got out it had become Scouting USA, and they had come up with belt loops (which was basically merit badges for younger kids).

 

There was a major change in the way scouting was done in about 1974.

Pard, I have a reprint of the original 1910 handbook, as well as a collection of stuff from my father's era and grandfather's era.  My kids are 5th generation Scouts (my great-grandfather having been one of the first Scouters, my grandfather, father, and I being both Scouts and Scouters, and the boys being Scouts).  OA started as a separate organization and was incorporated into BSA shortly thereafter as Scouting's honor society; the two groups found partnering rather than competing to be mutually beneficial.  But all the old books I have -- going back to the original -- list a left-handed handshake as the regular handshake.  I don't have any OA memorabilia older than my era, but I have all the Boy Scout stuff going all the way to the beginning.  So if you were intertwining fingers, the guys in your Troop were doing the OA handshake.  

Edited by Cyrus Cassidy #45437

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Thanks for the history lessons about Scouting.  Great information.
 

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I needs me a kilt!!   :lol:

 

 

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1 minute ago, Hardpan Curmudgeon SASS #8967 said:

I needs me a kilt!!   :lol:

 

 

 

My clan kilt was handmade in Scotland by a custom kilt maker.  It was VERY expensive.  For Scouting, I recommend going a bit cheaper with an acrylic kilt.  Acrylic is not authentic, and those of us who are in tune with our Scottish roots can see when someone is wearing it, but for a Scouting uniform you don't want to spend upwards of $500 on a kilt.  I bought my acrylic MacLaren kilt here:  https://www.atlantakilts.com

 

But remember, GET A SPORRAN TOO!  A kilt without a sporran is a skirt.   

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Thankee for the link, Cyrus!  I'll check 'em out...!

 

Despite the protests of the Scout Executive, the three times I served on Wood Badge staff kilts were worn by those who had 'em.  I didn't, darnit.  Anyway, the guy just didn't like kilts, but he was largely ignored on that subject.  ^_^

 

Wood Badgers would of course wear the Maclaren tartan, but "utility kilts" have become pretty popular at summer camp, "family camp," Camporees, and whatever.  

 

Hm.  Mebbe I oughtta get an OD utility kilt and a Maclaren and a Sutherland....   :rolleyes:

 

Oh ~ I will make my own sporran.  Wanna eventually fire up the forge and make my own sgian-dubh, too.   ;)

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Oh, come on.  Maybe $150 for the fabric, a good heavy belt, a shirt and an "Irish jacket" and you're all set with a Feileadh Mòr.  Less if you go with a wool/poly blend.  
Ancient Highland Dress | Scottish Tartans Authority

 

Ancient Highland Dress | Scottish Tartans Authority

 

Tartans & Plaids

 

Make your own sporran, most of the commercial ones I've seen don't hold much:

Sporran Pattern. I have made this and it looks wonderful - full ...

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4 minutes ago, Hardpan Curmudgeon SASS #8967 said:

Thankee for the link, Cyrus!  I'll check 'em out...!

 

Despite the protests of the Scout Executive, the three times I served on Wood Badge staff kilts were worn by those who had 'em.  I didn't, darnit.  Anyway, the guy just didn't like kilts, but he was largely ignored on that subject.  ^_^

 

Wood Badgers would of course wear the Maclaren tartan, but "utility kilts" have become pretty popular at summer camp, "family camp," Camporees, and whatever.  

 

Hm.  Mebbe I oughtta get an OD utility kilt and a Maclaren and a Sutherland....   :rolleyes:

 

Oh ~ I will make my own sporran.  Wanna eventually fire up the forge and make my own sgian-dubh, too.   ;)

 

Occasionally a nay-sayer will point out that BSA uniform regulations do not have provisions for a kilt.

 

**BUT**

 

1- BSA is not the military.  Uniform regulations are not military regulations.

 

2- Baden-Powell himself described the Scouting uniform when the movement was new.  He said the uniform shirt should be worn with olive trousers, "or a kilt if he is a Scotsman."  Therefore, kilts were part of his original vision.

 

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Over the years I have successfully nominated four people for the Silver Beaver.  The first was a lady named Rose... she wore her Maclaren kilt to the formal awards dinner.  The fella mentioned above cringed a mite, but not a word was said.  :lol:

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Posted (edited)

My dad taught me as a kid.
He was an eye doctor who wanted to be a blacksmith.

I'm pretty decent on a DC-reverse rig.
It just sits quietly in the garage until called on again.
This is less and less as the years continue to mount up.
I wanted to learn TIG, but never had any real need to justify the expense.

Edited by bgavin

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I was a certified nuclear welder using mig or stick until Three Mile Island, then I went to ornamental iron and structural steel. Not a job for sissies in Phoenix in the summer such as the day it hit 122 degrees. A back surgery ended that line of work and I learned property appraisal. 

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