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1918 and the Spanish Flu


Subdeacon Joe

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https://cityofdallaspreservation.wordpress.com/2018/10/12/on-this-day-in-dallas-oct-12-1918-mayor-lawther-bans-all-public-gatherings-in-effort-to-slow-spread-of-spanish-flu/?fbclid=IwAR354pKsj-sk1Z8CWm-0uooThsiZFFFyq9LzmtBG_5mIWt3VgnR_a1mbJqo

 

Despite the risk to the public, Dallas officials went forward with a Liberty Loan parade on Sept 28, 1918. Dallas had held three previous Liberty Loan parades since 1917, which were a popular way for cities to raise money for the war effort. Soldiers from France and elsewhere travelled to American cities to participate in the parades. Thousands of people turned out for the September parade in Downtown Dallas.

Within days of the Fourth Liberty Loan parade, the Spanish Flu began to spread across Dallas like wildfire and all areas of the city were affected. Entire families were stricken with the virus, and doctor and nurse shortages were common as more health workers became ill. Flu cases and deaths rose exponentially, but Dallas officials – including Dallas Health Officer Dr. A.W. Carnes – hesitated to impose a ban on public gatherings. Finally, on October 12th, with reports of the flu rising 20 times higher than what they had been less than two weeks before, Dallas Mayor Joseph E. Lawther ordered a temporary halt of all public gatherings and closed all schools, colleges, universities, and churches.

 

What I find more interesting than the story about the influenza is this photo in the article:

43454615470_a65d656e24_n.jpg

 

Victory Liberty Loan Parade in Dallas (Elm and Akard Street) in 1917, one of four parades held for the war effort. DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University

 

State of the art tanks in 1918.

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3 hours ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

https://cityofdallaspreservation.wordpress.com/2018/10/12/on-this-day-in-dallas-oct-12-1918-mayor-lawther-bans-all-public-gatherings-in-effort-to-slow-spread-of-spanish-flu/?fbclid=IwAR354pKsj-sk1Z8CWm-0uooThsiZFFFyq9LzmtBG_5mIWt3VgnR_a1mbJqo

 

Despite the risk to the public, Dallas officials went forward with a Liberty Loan parade on Sept 28, 1918. Dallas had held three previous Liberty Loan parades since 1917, which were a popular way for cities to raise money for the war effort. Soldiers from France and elsewhere travelled to American cities to participate in the parades. Thousands of people turned out for the September parade in Downtown Dallas.

Within days of the Fourth Liberty Loan parade, the Spanish Flu began to spread across Dallas like wildfire and all areas of the city were affected. Entire families were stricken with the virus, and doctor and nurse shortages were common as more health workers became ill. Flu cases and deaths rose exponentially, but Dallas officials – including Dallas Health Officer Dr. A.W. Carnes – hesitated to impose a ban on public gatherings. Finally, on October 12th, with reports of the flu rising 20 times higher than what they had been less than two weeks before, Dallas Mayor Joseph E. Lawther ordered a temporary halt of all public gatherings and closed all schools, colleges, universities, and churches.

 

What I find more interesting than the story about the influenza is this photo in the article:

43454615470_a65d656e24_n.jpg

 

Victory Liberty Loan Parade in Dallas (Elm and Akard Street) in 1917, one of four parades held for the war effort. DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University

 

State of the art tanks in 1918.

Renault FTs bought from France. The French were on the cutting edge of tank technology all the way through the 30s. If they had the leadership the Germans did the invasion of 1940 would have been a lot different.

Here’s GSP with a Renault.
 

A32FB0DD-235B-49CB-B69E-22ACDD97A6F6.jpeg

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