Jump to content
SASS Wire Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Subdeacon Joe

More Ship Handling

Recommended Posts



https://epeak.in/2020/02/02/watch-as-captain-nimbly-docks-huge-ship-in-violent-waters/?jwsource=cl

 

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7941765/Frightening-moment-cruise-ship-rocks-violently-docks-extreme-weather-conditions-Norway.html

 

Fantastic use of engines, thrusters (if any), anchors, and weather to bring her in with minimal damage.  Some dents around the stern fender rails and some scuffed paint.

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow! and it was dragging anchor too. Very impressive maneuvering.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Pat Riot, SASS #13748 said:

Wow! and it was dragging anchor too. Very impressive maneuvering.

 

I'm thinking that he let go his anchors bow and stern then let out chain one shot at a time, as well as having the anchors drag.  There are a few times where there is slack in the chain and then it goes taut again, and it looks to me like chain had been fed out.
Either way. good ship handling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Subdeacon Joe said:

 

I'm thinking that he let go his anchors bow and stern then let out chain one shot at a time, as well as having the anchors drag.  There are a few times where there is slack in the chain and then it goes taut again, and it looks to me like chain had been fed out.
Either way. good ship handling.

Look at the last part of the video. That chain looks taut and moving with the ship. Impressive!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Pat Riot, SASS #13748 said:

Look at the last part of the video. That chain looks taut and moving with the ship. Impressive!

 

Yep, I caught that.  Which is why I said " let out chain one shot at a time, as well as having the anchors drag."  Earlier in it, though, it looks like the chain between the white shot and the ship lengthens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chain management. Azipod/thrusters fully engaged. 

A seasoned captain and crew. 

That is old-school seamanship at its finest right there!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Makes me wonder about modern Cruse Liners.  Really incredible amount of Top Hamper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bet it was hard to get her lined up with the wind blowing athwart ship, that's a lot of sail area.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Colorado Coffinmaker said:

 

Makes me wonder about modern Cruse Liners.  Really incredible amount of Top Hamper.

Yep. Too bad the captain of the Costa Concordia was more interested in schmoozing than seamanship. Ran one of the most modern liners up on the rocks in perfect weather.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMHO, Scandanavian and most American masters are competent. Others, not so much.

 

Masters with Great Lakes experience are pretty good at docking in violent seas. Gulf OSV captains have learned the hard way about dangerous seas and winds. Canadians with experience in Eastern Canadian waters and harbors are either good or wrecked.  :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Mud Marine,SASS#54686 Life said:

IMHO, Scandanavian and most American masters are competent. Others, not so much.

 

Masters with Great Lakes experience are pretty good at docking in violent seas. Gulf OSV captains have learned the hard way about dangerous seas and winds. Canadians with experience in Eastern Canadian waters and harbors are either good or wrecked.  :D

Absolutely, positively, utterly and completely TRUE!!!

I've spoken with salt water sailors who flat refused service on the Great Lakes due to how fast and unexpectedly the fresh water seas get really nasty!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/3/2020 at 11:07 AM, Subdeacon Joe said:

Fantastic use of engines, thrusters (if any), anchors, and weather to bring her in with minimal damage.  Some dents around the stern fender rails and some scuffed paint.

 

Vesseltracker.com, updated daily, shows only three damage incidents, none of them due to docking. There are HUGE fenders/bumpers on the docks that can absorb a lot energy - like 10-12' in diameter and maybe 20' long.

 

https://www.trelleborg.com/en/marine-and-infrastructure/markets--and--applications/port--and--terminals/cruise--terminals

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.