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Billy Boots, # 20282 LTG-Regulator

The Gamer topic

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The Gamer topic comes up ever so often and even recently but I did not want to interfere with that recent OP's thread so thought the following might be interesting to some.  As many of you know I used to write having numerous articles make a few publications, a part of SHOOT magazine, and one particular website of period.  The following article was published in The Chronicle in 2002.  One can tell by products mentioned, it was "the ol'days".  In fact, I was 57 and now still shooting CAS at 74.  Judging by times mentioned, I had not even tackled the double duelist style of shooting, still trading off left gun to right hand....but definitely a duelist.   In reading this old article that I inadvertently  found this morning, I suggest the argument, if that, is still much the same in, at least my conclusion then.

 

Note: An interesting connection to this article was that my late friend Wes Fargo began using the term "Time Shaver" himself in his gunsmithing tricks or perhaps he thought of it first, I don't remember.  (Miss you Wes.)

 

Article is lengthy as I was, and still am, rather "long-winded".  Hope you enjoy.

 

 

Time Shavers

By Billy Boots 20282 LTG

 

Although I have followed arguments and finger pointing about so-called “gamers” for three years, I have basically stayed out of discussions in writings and on the wire since I’m a disciple of the  “The more you stir it, the worse it stinks” school of thought.  After all, a gamer to some could be anyone who places above them.  Truth is, I probably fall into many shooters’ eyes as fitting the mold of such a competitor for the simple reason that I often share the winners’ circle in the areas I shoot.   Another justification for branding me with the g-label is that some of the shooting transitions and moves I thought “gamey” two or three years ago by some, I find myself doing today.  I have henceforth accepted the fact that according to those definitions, by golly, I must be a gamer.

 

But now the gamey insinuations by some have gone a step further, and I am bothered.  I do not mean to suggest that all that toss this label about mean harm, but I do take exception to the charge that others and I might be negligent of, or lacking in, Spirit of the Game.  Here’s where I must draw the line and wave hands as unacceptable.  Agreed, there is a hairline percentage of competitors who have no regard for SOG, but gee whiz, it is such a small few, who cares?  Besides, a couple of SOG penalties and that should educate them or send them packing.  Better yet, if you see a negative SOG trend in a new shooter, especially younger ones, bring it to his or her attention that you do not think they are working within the intent of the scenario and that  is not the cowboy way.     

 

What is lack of Spirit of the Game?  I think of it as a tendency by a small percentage to go further than merely making a few  “short cuts” when shooting a stage, to additionally placing far too little importance on assisting in posse chores.  Yet, I get the impression that many shooters perceive that procedures and practices that get into the boundaries of competition and out of the ring of “childhood cowboy fantasies” are wrong for our sport.  Hopefully, I am mistaken in my observation.

 

In a quest to declare if I really have evil (gamey) intentions, let’s take a look at my attire and equipment, although you could plug in many fine shooters like Dan Nabbit, Pearl Hart, Sundown Jones, Single Action Jackson and hundreds more that have invested plenty in equipment and clothing (not to mention travel).   Firstly, I am dressed to the hilt in period-correct apparel, looking more like a true cowboy in pre-1900 than The Duke ever looked, in garments bought mostly from match vendors and fellow CAS shooters.   Leather consists of a custom-made holster rig by Big Ed and a contoured shotgun belt by Rimrock-- both fellows are fine leather craftsmen and big SASS supporters.  I shoot fine-tuned revolvers in 38 special caliber.  Why this caliber instead of the 45 Long Colt which some folks declare THE cowboy cartridge?  With thirty years of shooting magnum cartridges, including a good diet of full throttle 454s, I assure you a match of even 38 specials will often make my wrist ache.  But mainly they are my caliber of choice because to me they are the most fun to shoot, not to mention one of the most economical means of shooting available. I shoot firearms from companies who give me a little special attention and actually express that they appreciate my business.  I use gunsmiths to tune my guns who I trust and have admiration for their work.  Do these things make me a gamer?

 

OK, now, how about the match.  Let us consider this hypothetical scenario.  Rifle is staged in corner about four steps away from door, shotgun on bar five steps right of corner.  Standing in doorway at the buzzer you are to step forward and sweep five pistol targets with each revolver.  You are to then engage three rifle targets with three rounds each. Then, finish the stage with four shotgun knockdowns.  Simple instructions, right?  Almost too elementary, but these directions are open to interpretation with little chance of a procedural call.  Think about the stage and decide how you would shoot it.  Am I a gamer if I stand in the doorway taking a little more time than another shooter to re-access the stage in my mind before taking a deep breath and nodding for the buzzer?  Is it taboo for me to step close to my rifle so when I finish firing the last revolver shot I can be leaning to pick up the rifle as I holster the revolver?  And, is it taking unfair advantage that I can be holstering one gun as the other is drawn?   It is simply making use of both hands at the same time--hopefully, cowboys in the 1800’s had instinct to do the same thing.   Since the stage instructions lack the phrase “no double tabs” nor do they describe the direction of sweep, I would probably sweep right then left which might save a hint of time but happens to be one of my favorite ways to make the run.   I will even triple tap rifle targets, not sweep since it did not instruct.  Is this a gamey trick?  While on the way to the shotgun, I have procured two shells in my left hand-- one does not have to be weasel smart to figure this a good idea.  I then snap the shotgun stock into the sweet spot of the shoulder, drop the two shells in, snap action closed, and whammo!  Instantly action is broken open, chambers pointing slightly downward as the empty hulls fall out with a snap. Quickly the shotgun butt is back to shoulder as left hand is bringing up a fresh pair of shells.   Bam-bam…stage is over. 

 

Most any cowboy shooter could do all this in less than a minute with slow movement, decent out of the box firepower, store bought ammo, basic leather, with little exertion of energy, and all left-right sweeps.  Let us assume I conservatively shoot the stage in 36 seconds in my usual duelist fashion.  Did I have fun?  You dern tootin’!  Did I cheat or abuse Spirit of the Game?  I don’t think so, and I also suggest to you that I had just as much fun as a cowboy who did it HIS way, but twenty seconds slower. 

 

My ability to shoot the aforementioned stage in the thirties is due mostly to my enjoyment of some 20-30 thousand rounds of live practice annually, almost daily dry-firing exercises, schooling at Evil Roy Shooting School, getting tips from some of the best cowboy action shooters in the world (many I call good friends), and proper mental assessment of stage.  Notice, I did not mention a regimental diet and heavy physical work-outs, a good idea and a tad of it I do; however, I also accept being guilty of a few bad habits at 57 years of age.  The equipment I used possibly shortened my raw time by a few seconds, and several more seconds were shaved in time through mentally processing the stage beforehand and using proper transitions.  Yes, done in order to surpass fellow competitors, but also to appease myself for all the practice.   Is this unsportsman-like?  We do still refer to this game as a sport, and a sport signifies competition. 

 

 If you relate it all to early West, then let’s say the cowboy did it to win the gunfight.  He might have been gamey, but he did not end up in Boot Hill.    Many of the legends of the West such as Wyatt Earp and Tom Horn were known to have practiced their shooting skills.  (Heck, I would like to think that if there had been an Evil Roy, Tequila, or San Juan shooting school near them, they would have wanted to attend.) 

 

I pretended as a cowboy about as frequently growing up as any shooter alive.  I was spoiled with the newest of play guns since my family’s business had toys in the inventory.  I was not big into baseball or football; I preferred “make-believe”, especially the fantasy of cowboys and gunfights.  I also shot over twenty years of competition before I joined SASS.  Other shooters and myself have that desire to win in our blood where others may not.  Do those of us who shave time in thought, equipment, and speed due to the competitiveness in our veins, yet have the fantasy and costume, not have a place in this game?  If any one feels that way, then try a match without a timer and see how many shooters show up month after month.  I doubt it will prove worth your time in preparation.  Nevertheless, I guess you would have a nice costume and plinking party,

 

It is time for the whiners to get over it. The majority of the folks they're sneering at put our hearts, souls, and money into the sport by traveling to more matches and buying more advertisers’ equipment than most. And while we may play the game differently, it doesn't mean that we don't play fairly.   SASS is a sponsor that is close to my heart, and I invest a lot with the peace of mind that the majority of members appreciate what others like me bring to it.  So let us call my kind TIME-SHAVERS, not gamers.  I’ll wear that title, and if the boot fits, you wear it also.  But do not say I lack Spirit of the Game. SOG is also about friendship, sharing tips, loaning equipment, and being a good posse member.  Ninety-nine percent of those folks in the winner's circle are all about that, as are most SASS members.  After all that is the cowboy way.

 

 

 

 

 

Reprinted from September 2002 issue of The Cowboy Chronicle, The Monthly Journal of the Single Action Shooting Society.

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Well said Billy! It’s been my honor and privilege to Posse with you at EOT on several occasions . I can say for certain that anyone that has a problem with the way you play the game has some issues. If folks would just watch, they could sure learn. Proud to call you friend!

1 hour ago, Billy Boots, # 20282 LTG-Regulator said:

The Gamer topic comes up ever so often and even recently but I did not want to interfere with that recent OP's thread so thought the following might be interesting to some.  As many of you know I used to write having numerous articles make a few publications, a part of SHOOT magazine, and one particular website of period.  The following article was published in The Chronicle in 2002.  One can tell by products mentioned, it was "the ol'days".  In fact, I was 57 and now still shooting CAS at 74.  Judging by times mentioned, I had not even tackled the double duelist style of shooting, still trading off left gun to right hand....but definitely a duelist.   In reading this old article that I inadvertently  found this morning, I suggest the argument, if that, is still much the same in, at least my conclusion then.

 

Note: An interesting connection to this article was that my late friend Wes Fargo began using the term "Time Shaver" himself in his gunsmithing tricks or perhaps he thought of it first, I don't remember.  (Miss you Wes.)

 

Article is lengthy as I was, and still am, rather "long-winded".  Hope you enjoy.

 

 

Time Shavers

By Billy Boots 20282 LTG

 

Although I have followed arguments and finger pointing about so-called “gamers” for three years, I have basically stayed out of discussions in writings and on the wire since I’m a disciple of the  “The more you stir it, the worse it stinks” school of thought.  After all, a gamer to some could be anyone who places above them.  Truth is, I probably fall into many shooters’ eyes as fitting the mold of such a competitor for the simple reason that I often share the winners’ circle in the areas I shoot.   Another justification for branding me with the g-label is that some of the shooting transitions and moves I thought “gamey” two or three years ago by some, I find myself doing today.  I have henceforth accepted the fact that according to those definitions, by golly, I must be a gamer.

 

But now the gamey insinuations by some have gone a step further, and I am bothered.  I do not mean to suggest that all that toss this label about mean harm, but I do take exception to the charge that others and I might be negligent of, or lacking in, Spirit of the Game.  Here’s where I must draw the line and wave hands as unacceptable.  Agreed, there is a hairline percentage of competitors who have no regard for SOG, but gee whiz, it is such a small few, who cares?  Besides, a couple of SOG penalties and that should educate them or send them packing.  Better yet, if you see a negative SOG trend in a new shooter, especially younger ones, bring it to his or her attention that you do not think they are working within the intent of the scenario and that  is not the cowboy way.     

 

What is lack of Spirit of the Game?  I think of it as a tendency by a small percentage to go further than merely making a few  “short cuts” when shooting a stage, to additionally placing far too little importance on assisting in posse chores.  Yet, I get the impression that many shooters perceive that procedures and practices that get into the boundaries of competition and out of the ring of “childhood cowboy fantasies” are wrong for our sport.  Hopefully, I am mistaken in my observation.

 

In a quest to declare if I really have evil (gamey) intentions, let’s take a look at my attire and equipment, although you could plug in many fine shooters like Dan Nabbit, Pearl Hart, Sundown Jones, Single Action Jackson and hundreds more that have invested plenty in equipment and clothing (not to mention travel).   Firstly, I am dressed to the hilt in period-correct apparel, looking more like a true cowboy in pre-1900 than The Duke ever looked, in garments bought mostly from match vendors and fellow CAS shooters.   Leather consists of a custom-made holster rig by Big Ed and a contoured shotgun belt by Rimrock-- both fellows are fine leather craftsmen and big SASS supporters.  I shoot fine-tuned revolvers in 38 special caliber.  Why this caliber instead of the 45 Long Colt which some folks declare THE cowboy cartridge?  With thirty years of shooting magnum cartridges, including a good diet of full throttle 454s, I assure you a match of even 38 specials will often make my wrist ache.  But mainly they are my caliber of choice because to me they are the most fun to shoot, not to mention one of the most economical means of shooting available. I shoot firearms from companies who give me a little special attention and actually express that they appreciate my business.  I use gunsmiths to tune my guns who I trust and have admiration for their work.  Do these things make me a gamer?

 

OK, now, how about the match.  Let us consider this hypothetical scenario.  Rifle is staged in corner about four steps away from door, shotgun on bar five steps right of corner.  Standing in doorway at the buzzer you are to step forward and sweep five pistol targets with each revolver.  You are to then engage three rifle targets with three rounds each. Then, finish the stage with four shotgun knockdowns.  Simple instructions, right?  Almost too elementary, but these directions are open to interpretation with little chance of a procedural call.  Think about the stage and decide how you would shoot it.  Am I a gamer if I stand in the doorway taking a little more time than another shooter to re-access the stage in my mind before taking a deep breath and nodding for the buzzer?  Is it taboo for me to step close to my rifle so when I finish firing the last revolver shot I can be leaning to pick up the rifle as I holster the revolver?  And, is it taking unfair advantage that I can be holstering one gun as the other is drawn?   It is simply making use of both hands at the same time--hopefully, cowboys in the 1800’s had instinct to do the same thing.   Since the stage instructions lack the phrase “no double tabs” nor do they describe the direction of sweep, I would probably sweep right then left which might save a hint of time but happens to be one of my favorite ways to make the run.   I will even triple tap rifle targets, not sweep since it did not instruct.  Is this a gamey trick?  While on the way to the shotgun, I have procured two shells in my left hand-- one does not have to be weasel smart to figure this a good idea.  I then snap the shotgun stock into the sweet spot of the shoulder, drop the two shells in, snap action closed, and whammo!  Instantly action is broken open, chambers pointing slightly downward as the empty hulls fall out with a snap. Quickly the shotgun butt is back to shoulder as left hand is bringing up a fresh pair of shells.   Bam-bam…stage is over. 

 

Most any cowboy shooter could do all this in less than a minute with slow movement, decent out of the box firepower, store bought ammo, basic leather, with little exertion of energy, and all left-right sweeps.  Let us assume I conservatively shoot the stage in 36 seconds in my usual duelist fashion.  Did I have fun?  You dern tootin’!  Did I cheat or abuse Spirit of the Game?  I don’t think so, and I also suggest to you that I had just as much fun as a cowboy who did it HIS way, but twenty seconds slower. 

 

My ability to shoot the aforementioned stage in the thirties is due mostly to my enjoyment of some 20-30 thousand rounds of live practice annually, almost daily dry-firing exercises, schooling at Evil Roy Shooting School, getting tips from some of the best cowboy action shooters in the world (many I call good friends), and proper mental assessment of stage.  Notice, I did not mention a regimental diet and heavy physical work-outs, a good idea and a tad of it I do; however, I also accept being guilty of a few bad habits at 57 years of age.  The equipment I used possibly shortened my raw time by a few seconds, and several more seconds were shaved in time through mentally processing the stage beforehand and using proper transitions.  Yes, done in order to surpass fellow competitors, but also to appease myself for all the practice.   Is this unsportsman-like?  We do still refer to this game as a sport, and a sport signifies competition. 

 

 If you relate it all to early West, then let’s say the cowboy did it to win the gunfight.  He might have been gamey, but he did not end up in Boot Hill.    Many of the legends of the West such as Wyatt Earp and Tom Horn were known to have practiced their shooting skills.  (Heck, I would like to think that if there had been an Evil Roy, Tequila, or San Juan shooting school near them, they would have wanted to attend.) 

 

I pretended as a cowboy about as frequently growing up as any shooter alive.  I was spoiled with the newest of play guns since my family’s business had toys in the inventory.  I was not big into baseball or football; I preferred “make-believe”, especially the fantasy of cowboys and gunfights.  I also shot over twenty years of competition before I joined SASS.  Other shooters and myself have that desire to win in our blood where others may not.  Do those of us who shave time in thought, equipment, and speed due to the competitiveness in our veins, yet have the fantasy and costume, not have a place in this game?  If any one feels that way, then try a match without a timer and see how many shooters show up month after month.  I doubt it will prove worth your time in preparation.  Nevertheless, I guess you would have a nice costume and plinking party,

 

It is time for the whiners to get over it. The majority of the folks they're sneering at put our hearts, souls, and money into the sport by traveling to more matches and buying more advertisers’ equipment than most. And while we may play the game differently, it doesn't mean that we don't play fairly.   SASS is a sponsor that is close to my heart, and I invest a lot with the peace of mind that the majority of members appreciate what others like me bring to it.  So let us call my kind TIME-SHAVERS, not gamers.  I’ll wear that title, and if the boot fits, you wear it also.  But do not say I lack Spirit of the Game. SOG is also about friendship, sharing tips, loaning equipment, and being a good posse member.  Ninety-nine percent of those folks in the winner's circle are all about that, as are most SASS members.  After all that is the cowboy way.

 

 

 

 

 

Reprinted from September 2002 issue of The Cowboy Chronicle, The Monthly Journal of the Single Action Shooting Society.

 

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Good stuff and fairly explained for all. Now we just need Buck D. Law to come up with a “certified time shaver” document to go along with my “bonafide gamer” card. :)

 

regards

 

:FlagAm: :FlagAm: :FlagAm:

 

Gateway Kid

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36 seconds!

Gosh Billy what did you do? Take a nap or have a quick drink at the bar? :rolleyes:

 

Good article.

 

;)

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31 minutes ago, Gateway Kid SASS# 70038 Life said:

Good stuff and fairly explained for all. Now we just need Buck D. Law to come up with a “certified time shaver” document to go along with my “bonafide gamer” card. :)

 

regards

 

:FlagAm: :FlagAm: :FlagAm:

 

Gateway Kid

 

How about a button :lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:

jacot23_003_2_25.thumb.png.c8964b27d74b76be5cfe932397102f71.png

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37 minutes ago, Ringer said:

36 seconds!

Gosh Billy what did you do? Take a nap or have a quick drink at the bar? :rolleyes:

 

Good article.

 

;)

Me at the bar..:D...And to think in 2002, I was probably  pretty proud of 36.  No doubt the next two years had me learning a lot, especially in the art of Time Shaving and becoming efficient in the then new category of FCD.  It all paid off long enough for me to hit the "big lights" in 2004, a  little more time and I mastered double duelist, a huge time shaver, which improved my stage times significantly.  Trouble was, others were catching on also.   Lefty Eastman and Nicki Sixgun were  shoving me down a notch or two...then comes some guy from Ohio, Stone Creek Drifter, to constantly get my attention...not that the likes of you, Big Iron Buster, Coffee, Tame Bill, Fast Hammer,  and a bunch more wasn't enough. Now it's a real race in most any category, glad you and I can still learn and play the game. Hope to see ya soon.

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1 hour ago, Tyrel Cody said:

 

How about a button :lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:

jacot23_003_2_25.thumb.png.c8964b27d74b76be5cfe932397102f71.png

I like that Tyrel.

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2 hours ago, Tyrel Cody said:

 

How about a button :lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:

jacot23_003_2_25.thumb.png.c8964b27d74b76be5cfe932397102f71.png

Awesome!!!

 

Gateway Kid

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Billy, when I first met you, Loooooonnngg ago, I was labelled a gamer quit a lot. Didn't bother me in the least, I was probably at or near the top of my game at that time. I NEVER thought of myself that way or anyone else for that matter. Still, competition is the driving force  even if I don't get to shoot as much anymore. Of coarse you are a lot older than me (8 days I think) so you know more about that.:D I still try to win, just doesn't happen that often anymore, not enough practice, not enough time, etc. Still like shooting with you. Hope to do more of it this year. See you again, old friend.

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2 hours ago, Texas John Ringo, SASS #10138 said:

Billy, when I first met you, Loooooonnngg ago, I was labelled a gamer quit a lot. Didn't bother me in the least, I was probably at or near the top of my game at that time. I NEVER thought of myself that way or anyone else for that matter. Still, competition is the driving force  even if I don't get to shoot as much anymore. Of coarse you are a lot older than me (8 days I think) so you know more about that.:D I still try to win, just doesn't happen that often anymore, not enough practice, not enough time, etc. Still like shooting with you. Hope to do more of it this year. See you again, old friend.

Yes youngster, you was THE Gamer back then.  I probably picked up on some "tricks" from you.  Like you, I'm not offended by being called gamer, actually kind of feel good about it as long as not said in a disrespectful tone.  Do hope we can shoot together once again soon.

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Been a long time Ringo. Hope to shoot with you again some day.

 

Billy,

As I'm sure you remember 2002-2005 were controversial years. Some of the Wild Bunch and shooters alike wanted it to be non-competitive while some of the Wild Bunch and shooters wanted it to be purely competitive. A big tug of war for several years and still is.

 

I was approached before the match by a group of top shooters at EOT in 2004 wanting my support for a Pro-Category in SASS. The Pros would pay an extra fee, shoot for money and have their own posse. That year SASS was filming EOT for the Outdoor Channel and put what they thought were the top 40 shooter's on two posses. By doing so, they were insured they would have the winner on film. That's where the Pro idea came from and I was totally opposed to it. Thought at the time it would be the downfall of SASS and take the fun out of the game. In today's terms, it would mean no shooter would have a chance to shoot with Matt Black unless you paid a Pro fee. Lost what I thought was some friends over my decision but still stand behind it today. That's where Western 3-Gun came from.

 

Then the move to New Mexico which opens up a whole other can of worms. No comment other than both parties were right and wrong.

 

Yep, those were the years. :-)

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9 hours ago, Long Hunter SASS #20389L said:

Been a long time Ringo. Hope to shoot with you again some day.

 

Long Hunter, It has been a long time. I also hope to shoot with you again. :D

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Good article, Sir William.  Boy, I'm glad I'm not a "Time Shaver" ( except during shooting matches).:o

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On 1/31/2020 at 9:43 PM, Long Hunter SASS #20389L said:

Been a long time Ringo. Hope to shoot with you again some day.

 

Billy,

As I'm sure you remember 2002-2005 were controversial years. Some of the Wild Bunch and shooters alike wanted it to be non-competitive while some of the Wild Bunch and shooters wanted it to be purely competitive. A big tug of war for several years and still is.

 

I was approached before the match by a group of top shooters at EOT in 2004 wanting my support for a Pro-Category in SASS. The Pros would pay an extra fee, shoot for money and have their own posse. That year SASS was filming EOT for the Outdoor Channel and put what they thought were the top 40 shooter's on two posses. By doing so, they were insured they would have the winner on film. That's where the Pro idea came from and I was totally opposed to it. Thought at the time it would be the downfall of SASS and take the fun out of the game. In today's terms, it would mean no shooter would have a chance to shoot with Matt Black unless you paid a Pro fee. Lost what I thought was some friends over my decision but still stand behind it today. That's where Western 3-Gun came from.

 

Then the move to New Mexico which opens up a whole other can of worms. No comment other than both parties were right and wrong.

 

Yep, those were the years. :-)

Yes I do. Dont think you lost many who did not side with what you, and I, thought right then, and now.  Hopefully not. We just loved the game so  much to not want the "pro" aspect to infect it. Like you, that is still my belief.   

Jim, we can look back, pat ourshelves on the back so to speak,  and be thankful we can still play without that mentioned tainting our sport .

Man, did we ever have some great posses together and some fun times. TJ Morales, H Doc, NonStop, the Hampton Family, C N Hobbs, Barbary Coast, and a few more come to mind to making a great posse.

Still remember and appreciate some great advice you have given me along the way. Your friendship is cherished. Memories of staying at Founders Ranch working on range and/or shooting are still so meaningful.......and the trip to WR in 07.

Hope to see you soon.

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@Tyrel Cody

 

Whenever the opposite of "time shaver" is defined, I'll take one of those buttons!

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Billy; 

 

Great article. Maybe time for a reprint in the Chronicle.

 

See ya at Winter Range.

 

Marshal Stone

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Great article Billy. I was never much good in sports but with the help of a lot of folks I found out I could do ok in Cowboy Action Shooting.  It's been my experience that the ones that use Gamer as a negative term don't like getting beat but don't want to put the time and money into practice and good well tuned equipment. I admit I can be very competitive but I always try to work as much as I can on a Posse. I really enjoy trying to help new shooters and I suppose some would accuse me of teaching them to be Gamers.  I try to impress upon new shooters that you'll gain much more time with good transitions  than you will trying to shoot faster, at least early on.

 

I think it was Dodge City Dixie that told me we're not Gamers, we're Thinkers, we think about how we're going to shoot a stage while we're still at the loading table,  we think about how to stage our guns, we think about how we'll transition from one gun to the next, we think about how we can most efficiently get from one shooting position to the next. While like you, I'll call myself a Gamer ( I have the card from Buck D. Law to prove it) I think Time Shaver and Thinker may be better terms.

 

Thanks again for your great article and I hope to see you again at EOT.

 

Randy

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19 minutes ago, Marshal Stone, SASS #53366 said:

 

Billy; 

 

Great article. Maybe time for a reprint in the Chronicle.

 

See ya at Winter Range.

 

Marshal Stone

 I agree!

 

Randy

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THE INTENT of the stage instructions, I believe, is important.  Deviating from the INTENT, by performing outside the intent because the stage instruction doesn’t specifically spell out every nuance of the meaning of the instruction (even though everyone knows what is intended or meant) is not acceptable, in my view.

     That is worth a P, at least, in my view, and you may define The Cowboy Way however you wish......while others wind up having to recreate The Gettysburg Address for every stage they write.

 

Cat Brules

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On 2/2/2020 at 8:43 AM, Lawdog Dago Dom said:

@Tyrel Cody

 

Whenever the opposite of "time shaver" is defined, I'll take one of those buttons!

Great read. Not just the article but the whole thread. My button idea :)

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Billy an OUTSTANDING article and thoroughly enjoyable thread! 

 

I am sorry I won't be able to join you this year at Winter Range. I should be healed well enough to attend EOT so save me a spot on your posse. 

 

 I am and remain your loyal and obedient servant,

 

Tame Bill

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Thank you for sharing the article and the follow-up commentary, a great thread and perspective. 

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