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Alpo

Musical question

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It's been a long time since I seriously played any music. Today I generally play by ear.

 

So I'm confused when looking at this bit of sheet music.

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 The things that make up the shark's eyes. They also show in the bass clef music below. What are they? I don't recall ever seeing anything like that. Maybe it's only for keyboard instruments. I assume that's for piano, since it's got both treble and bass music. One for each hand.

 

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Is this the score for "Baby Shark"?

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Fermata

Also known as a pause, or a grand pause, the fermata is used to add length to a note or rest. Although the duration of the pause depends on the music conductor, it is most often considered to be twice as long as a regular pause. It can also be placed at the end or the middle of a piece of movement.

 

I think the "eyes" are a fermata but those "shark's teeth" may be a Glissando of some kind. ???I'm not sure?? The teeth may also be a sign of a arpeggio.

 

Edited by Rye Miles #13621
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So they are used to make that half (2 beats) rest be a whole (4 beats) rest, and the half notes be whole notes? Unless the conductor wants to stretch them longer?

 

Looks to me like the teeth, along with the rest of the shark, were drawn in afterwards. Someone saw the fermatas, and had a thoughty-thought.

 

I'm guessing the composer wrote an E# instead of an F natural because there was not room to stack that G on top of an F.

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2 minutes ago, Alpo said:

So they are used to make that half (2 beats) rest be a whole (4 beats) rest, and the half notes be whole notes? Unless the conductor wants to stretch them longer?

 

Looks to me like the teeth, along with the rest of the shark, were drawn in afterwards. Someone saw the fermatas, and had a thoughty-thought.

 

I'm guessing the composer wrote an E# instead of an F natural because there was not room to stack that G on top of an F.

That's what I'm getting out of it. I've never seen "teeth" like that before. A glissando is written going up not straight like teeth.  I think you're right about the "thoughty thought", someone was trying to be a comedian!

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Definitely a comedian.  The c# e# and g# notes in the top (treble clef) is probably an add-on like most of the symbols of the "shark".  Otherwise the lowest note in the bass clef (a g note)would need to be marked with a # symbol as well.

 

If this was "hand" scored as was done before we had personal computers, then this was probably the last day before the guy walked off the job.

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