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Col Del Rio

1911 Fixed sights "adjusting"

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Greetings,

I have a 1911 (really 1991) Colt 45 I use for Wild Bunch shooting. I shoot traditional (i.e. one handed).   The pistol has fixed sights.  Is there a proven method to "adjust" the sights?Thanks,

 

Col. Del Rio

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The rear sight will adjust for windage by drifting it one way or the other.   If you are dealing with the front sight  that is staked you can have another taller or shorter re staked.   The other way would be to have a front sight installed with a dove tail.   Bullett 19707

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The rear sight can be drifted left or right.  Front sight may need to be cut down, notched or replaced.  I have a 1911 with factory unaltered G.I. sights that I use for Wild Bunch.  I just use Kentucky windage and Tennessee elevation for my sight adjustment.  Maybe that's why I miss the targets so often.:o

Edited by German Jim
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In addition to windage adjustment,  vertical adjustment can be accomplished by changing the powder charge. 

Blackfoot

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To change the windage you either drift the rear sight in the same direction you want the bullets to move,

or you use a file to open up the rear sight notch, taking off metal only on the side you want the bullets to

move to.  If you want the POI to move right, remove metal on the inside right of the sight.

 

Elevation can be corrected by changing the front sight, to raise POI remove some of the height of the front sight,

to lower it use a taller front sight.  A pelacement sight should cost around $11, and a competent gunsmith

should be able to stake it in for $20-$30.

 

Most 1911's are fairly good at shooting straight, so if it's a significant amount you need to move I'd

reassess your grip first.

 

Shadow Catcher

 

 

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Most 1911's are fairly good at shooting straight, so if it's a significant amount you need to move I'd

reassess your grip first.

 

And check your trigger pull technique - if you have trigger contacting the first joint of your trigger finger, you are "too far in".   Pull should be with the pad of the trigger finger, not the joint.

 

And check that you are not flinching.   A right hand shooter flinches with 1911 to the left and low on target.   Use a firm grip.   Practice with a dead/dummy round in the middle of your magazine.  Have a buddy load the round so you don't know when you will pull the trigger on it.   Have buddy watch your gun for a flinch with muzzle dropping "violently".   Then stop flinching if that is the problem.

 

Only after you have done all this, and get a tight group, and your buddy has shot a tight group, and they are both off target in same direction, should you move sights.

 

Good luck, GJ

 

Edited by Garrison Joe, SASS #60708
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Greetings,

I have a 1911 (really 1991) Colt 45 I use for Wild Bunch shooting. I shoot traditional (i.e. one handed).   The pistol has fixed sights.  Is there a proven method to "adjust" the sights?Thanks,

 

Col. Del Rio

 

How far off are they with factory ball ammo at 50'?

OLG 

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More recoil ( heavier bullet or more velocity) raises the point of impact.

Most pistols begin the recoil cycle before the bullet leaves the muzzle.

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Windage, can be adjusted a little bit with the rear sight, for the front elevation, just take a different hold on the target.

Hi, I'm lucky enough to have several different 1911's. Some shoot dead on and some need a 6 o'clock hold. Trick is to remember which is which. I try to use the same pistol for all my matches. Good Luck, regards, Mike

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Tom, I might have to disagree with you.  I have found the faster the bullet the lower the impact, bullet is out of the barrel before the gun recoils.  Slower and heavier bullets usually print high, because the gun is starting to recoil and the bullet is still in the barrel.   Does not seem to make much of a difference with a rifle though.

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Thanks All. I think it  may be my grip.  I gotta go to the range and do some serious paper research.

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On 12/31/2019 at 1:55 PM, Attica Jack #23953 said:

Tom, I might have to disagree with you.  I have found the faster the bullet the lower the impact, bullet is out of the barrel before the gun recoils.  Slower and heavier bullets usually print high, because the gun is starting to recoil and the bullet is still in the barrel.   Does not seem to make much of a difference with a rifle though.

This is correct.

Blackfoot

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Not really sight related but an old 1911 pin shooting trick for sweeps. A 1911 will tend to torque up and left during recoil. If the stage allows try moving right to left across the targets, it'll shave a little time.

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