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LEOs how do you carry your Glock?

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And the more often they rack the gun before the first shot the more serious they are!!! (Also seen in couple of movies, usually with shotguns)

That made me remember seeing a movie where the cops are clearing a HiRISE tenement in a big drug raid and when the cop is going down the stairwell every time he turned to a new floor there was that racking sound without firing a shot. I told my wife that his shotgun doesn't carry that much ammo and that the sound effects man must be getting paid piece work.

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With the Beretta I had to thumb the saftey before firing
 

Why?

 

With a double action automatic, you carry it with the hammer down and the safety off, just like a double action revolver. So all you have to do is pull the trigger to shoot it.

 

The only reason to ever put the safety on on a DA automatic is to lower the hammer, and then you immediately take it back off so that you are ready to fire if necessary.

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Why?

 

With a double action automatic, you carry it with the hammer down and the safety off, just like a double action revolver. So all you have to do is pull the trigger to shoot it.

 

The only reason to ever put the safety on on a DA automatic is to lower the hammer, and then you immediately take it back off so that you are ready to fire if necessary.

Safeties on semi autos are more than just decocking switches.  There are numerous documented cases of individuals being disarmed, and the gun snatcher not being able to make the gun function due to a safety being properly used.  

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Our department decided to go to the Glock 9mm. Because it wasn't mandatory and you had to buy your own, several of us decided to stay with our .357 revolvers for better stopping power.  After a couple years, they decided that they wanted everyone to carry the same gun for training and possible ammo liability purposes. They bought the guns and went with the Glock .40 cal.

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Safeties on semi autos are more than just decocking switches.  There are numerous documented cases of individuals being disarmed, and the gun snatcher not being able to make the gun function due to a safety being properly used.  

Very true. When the ISP went to the S&W 5904 from the 439, that feature was emphasized,even though the 439 had the same device. Those agencies that had officers on solo patrol were very concerned about disarming, since assistance could be literally miles away. The S&W could also be disabled by dropping the magazine. There was a story about a disarming with a DA auto where the bad guy did get the gun but could not figure out how to make it fire. By the time he noticed the red dots near the decocker and switched it, the officer drew a secondary weapon and shot his attacker. That made me black out the red dots near the decocker and paint the magazine release button bright red, thinking on a black gun that big red button would get noticed. And get the mag dropped. Then the Glock 21, under my shirt and strapped to my body armor, would get noticed.

Edited by Lawdog Dago Dom
spelling

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I know this was dorky as I read it... I'm going to have to go back to the Acknowledgements and see who the "firearms expert" was that helped the authors with the details of this book.  

 

I love the tv shows set in "modern day" where each shot of a revolver results in the tinkle of brass hitting the floor... 

 

That noise is my personal pet peeve in shows. 

Blue Bloods is one of my favorite shows, largely because of Tom Selleck. In one episode he is at the range with his youngest son who is also an officer. He hands his son a Smith and Wesson revolver to let him try it.

Bang bang bang. Clink clink clink.

I was disappointed that Mr Selleck let this happen.

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That noise is my personal pet peeve in shows. 

Blue Bloods is one of my favorite shows, largely because of Tom Selleck. In one episode he is at the range with his youngest son who is also an officer. He hands his son a Smith and Wesson revolver to let him try it.

Bang bang bang. Clink clink clink.

I was disappointed that Mr Selleck let this happen.

I doubt he even knew it until it aired.

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I doubt he even knew it until it aired.

Probably right. Sound editing is post-filming, and the editor probably has a standard audio clip for “handgun fired on indoor range”.

 

I do know that Tom Selleck worked closely with Mike Venturino during the Quigley movie to be authentic in how he handled the Sharps. I thought that mindset might carry to TV but he probably wasn’t allowed. 

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Very true. When the ISP went to the S&W 5904 from the 439, that feature was emphasized,even though the 439 had the same device. Those agencies that had officers on solo patrol were very concerned about disarming, since assistance could be literally miles away. The S&W could also be disabled by dropping the magazine. There was a story about a disarming with a DA auto where the bad guy did get the gun but could not figure out how to make it fire. By the time he noticed the red dots near the decocker and switched it, the officer drew a secondary weapon and shot his attacker. That made me black out the red dots near the decocker and paint the magazine release button bright red, thinking on a black gun that big red button would get noticed. And get the mag dropped. Then the Glock 21, under my shirt and strapped to my body armor, would get noticed.

The Illinois State Police was one of the first agencies to adopt a Smith & Wesson model 39. One thug disarmed an officer and attempted to shoot him, but the safety was on. He pushed a lever, which turned out to be the slide stop, and he still could not shoot the officer. He pushed a button, which caused the loaded magazine to slide out of the gun. FINALLY he found the safety lever and took it off, but because of the magazine disconnect he STILL could not shoot the officer. And finally the officer got his stick out and be the hell out of him.

 

I'm sure that there are people who would say this is a good reason for having magazine disconnects on your personal firearm. Having one saved that ISP trooper's life. I still don't want one on anything I own.

 

As for the "carrying the DA auto with the safety on", if that is so necessary, then why are more and more cops in this country armed with Glocks, that don't even have safeties?

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I was never privy to the state bid process for equipment. Off the top of my head, I would say purchasing a weapon for 2000 or so folks, safety would be a concern. So would reliability, replacement parts and function under a variety of conditions. Also how much training would be needed to get folks comfortable with a new weapon. How much would new leather cost?

 

I do not know if the S&W had any of these issues. I do know that one of the state's more experienced armorers was pushing very hard to adopt the Glock in the early 90's. And then the department went with the 5904 for the next 7-10 years. Go figure.

 

The folks that make the call on what to buy or not buy are rarely the ones using the item. Sometimes I think they would make better decisions with a coin flip.

 

But they are also the folks that caused the state to replace many, many 1999 Crown Victoria engines. But that's a story for another day.

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Probably right. Sound editing is post-filming, and the editor probably has a standard audio clip for “handgun fired on indoor range”.

 

I do know that Tom Selleck worked closely with Mike Venturino during the Quigley movie to be authentic in how he handled the Sharps. I thought that mindset might carry to TV but he probably wasn’t allowed. 

It seems that it’s actually rare for actors to even watch their tv series episodes. Maybe because they film so many in a row.

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