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War Grizzly

73 cut and weld short stroke how to.

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I'm looking for general information on what is typically done when a rifle is short stroked by the cut, bend, weld technique. I have a new Uberti 1873 rifle and I'm considering going this route instead of buying new toggle links.

For better or worse, I do my own gun work as part of what I enjoy about the sport and have my own machine shop. I've been able to short stroke my Rugers with good results by simply looking at pictures online but I can't seem to find anything showing what has been modified on Uberti rifles. I'm not looking for detailed specifics nor am I looking to work on anyone else's gun. I realize that this approach is not the cheapest and it will not result in the world's greatest rifle. Any help especially pictures would be much appreciated.

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1 hour ago, War Grizzly said:

I'm looking for general information on what is typically done when a rifle is short stroked by the cut, bend, weld technique. I have a new Uberti 1873 rifle and I'm considering going this route instead of buying new toggle links.

For better or worse, I do my own gun work as part of what I enjoy about the sport and have my own machine shop. I've been able to short stroke my Rugers with good results by simply looking at pictures online but I can't seem to find anything showing what has been modified on Uberti rifles. I'm not looking for detailed specifics nor am I looking to work on anyone else's gun. I realize that this approach is not the cheapest and it will not result in the world's greatest rifle. Any help especially pictures would be much appreciated.

I have one and would also like to know how it's done.

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For what it's worth here are some pics of a Cody Conagher short stroke.  I'm pretty sure he goes with cutting and welding.

image.png.9df1936e5f4d3b1c846a279c14d13648.png

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I had nothing but problems with a Commanchero, I sent it back and it was the same, jamming all the time. I ended up getting a 3rd gen short stroke kit from C&I and a new lever. A good friend and gunsmith here did it, works great! I suggest getting one stock and doing the SS. 

Edited by Rye Miles #13621
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Just borrow one from somebody, lay the parts out on a piece of heavy paper and draw around them as a basic templet. Cut, heat, beat, weld, hammer, add more material, file some off, cut bend beat some more to fine tune the timing. If you can Butcher a Hog, you can do it. Really, you ought to be able to visualize what you are doing, and why you are doing it. If you don't understand why you are bending the top of the lever, or adding material to the lifter, etc, then you might ought to reconsider things. The after market kits are easy, and with little effort, they work every time.

 

Snakebite

Edited by Snakebite
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Be prepared to buy some NEW parts to start over  :rolleyes:

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Obviously, a lot of gunsmiths are self-taught in the art of short stroking these guns.  So, being well equipped, I encourage you to learn by doing.

 

  My suggestion is to buy spare parts up front to learn/work with, rather than alter the original ones that are now part of an operable firearm. 

When you have guns short-stroked by a well known gunsmith, most will return your original parts, and include the price of the replacement parts in their charges.  

Just my $0.25 worth. 

 

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I've shot a cut&weld Cody '73 for 9 years. It jammed twice.  Finally went a bit out of time & Lassiter fixed that easily.

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Several have mentioned buying spare parts and modifying those.  Because one of the Cowboys and Indians SS kits comes with a new lever, a lot of gunsmiths and others who have installed it now have extra stock levers laying around, so you should be able to pick up one cheap.

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17 hours ago, Abilene, SASS # 27489 said:

Several have mentioned buying spare parts and modifying those.  Because one of the Cowboys and Indians SS kits comes with a new lever, a lot of gunsmiths and others who have installed it now have extra stock levers laying around, so you should be able to pick up one cheap.

True you can order a C&I ss kit with a new lever but I got my lever from vti.gunparts and saved about $30.00.

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21 hours ago, Colorado Coffinmaker said:

 

Be prepared to buy some NEW parts to start over  :rolleyes:

 

Yep! :lol:  It only looks simple because you do not know what all has to match up. 

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The theory in a cut and weld SS is to lengthen the part of the lever that goes from the pivot screw to the links.  This is done by sawing a cut in that part of the lever and bending it back so that the measurement between the two holes is increased by about .100”.  Then weld up the gap and bend the “finger-hole” part of the lever back to the proper position (the cut and weld will change the position of the finger lever so that it won’t be in the right position for proper operation.

 

You may also have to mill the slot in the links a little longer since the geometry has now changed.  Some add an early generation short stroke kit as well to get the stroke very close to SASS minimums.

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11 hours ago, Cypress Sam, SASS #10915 said:

The theory in a cut and weld SS is to lengthen the part of the lever that goes from the pivot screw to the links.  This is done by sawing a cut in that part of the lever and bending it back so that the measurement between the two holes is increased by about .100”.  Then weld up the gap and bend the “finger-hole” part of the lever back to the proper position (the cut and weld will change the position of the finger lever so that it won’t be in the right position for proper operation.

 

You may also have to mill the slot in the links a little longer since the geometry has now changed.  Some add an early generation short stroke kit as well to get the stroke very close to SASS minimums.

That's exactly the sort of info I was looking for. Kinda figured it was along those lines. I have some early gen short stroke links and some spare factory parts so I should be good to go. 

I've got to get deer season out of the way and then hopefully I'll tackle this on Thanksgiving weekend.

Thanks a million

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