Jump to content
SASS Wire Forum

New 1897 (to me)


dannyvp

Recommended Posts

I have a friend who found this is his dads closet and he knew I was looking for one.

 

it very hard to cycle right now due to no oil, and it still has a full length barrel. 

 

what do I need to look for in one?

what do you think of this one?

81E0BAEB-DBEB-4CD3-80ED-59255BCE00AF.jpeg

A1515DC9-7F2C-4989-A76B-DBB34C201D91.jpeg

90DD7180-0A75-4A3A-A162-F3D7803A2078.jpeg

18899513-0646-44BA-A43A-F7BE711BBA12.jpeg

CB8101A7-60A6-4413-8741-EFB657D96335.jpeg

59C5E54C-1421-4348-ABF3-52E895731E24.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like somebody tried to make a take down 1897 into a fixed barrel 1897 for some reason. Very poor welding work. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Why welded? Probably loose when assembled and would not stay together to fire safely. 

Would take major investment to get this one working.  IMHO.   GJ

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry I fat fingered the title. It’s a 1897.

he hasn’t given me a price, he asked me what it was worth.

 

is there a way to test it or inspect it to see if it’s safe?

Link to post
Share on other sites

IF it is shootable, I would not pay more than a hundred bucks for it.   Would like to see a pic of the whole thing, not just closeups.

 

That welding spot makes me wonder why it is there.  

 

And even though it looks like it's a mess, I'd still not cut the barrel.  Long barrels are cool.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, H. K. Uriah, SASS #74619 said:

And even though it looks like it's a mess, I'd still not cut the barrel.  Long barrels are cool.

the only reason I would cut is this is for my 11 year old. That’s a lot of fun for him to hold. The one he shot was pretty short.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Take a pass unless he gives it to you for a parts gun.  It appears to me that the adjustment to tighten the take down worked loose and rather than repair it properly, it was welded.  If you are going to go the Winchester 97 route, it's always good to have spare parts laying around.  No telling what type of damage the heat did.  Can't see the stock, but good stocks are hard to find.  Maybe some of the internal stuff is good too.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's not worth a dime and it is too dangerous to fire, especially with modern powder. I wouldn't let my 11 yo grandson anywhere near a firing line with that weapon. Please heed the advice of much more experienced people and don't take it.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

BUY THE GUN...... BUT, offer your friend $25.00 for it.   It’s good for parts but not good for either shooting or as a wall hanger.  It is just too rough, and potentially dangerous.     Now, you have some work to do. 

 

 For this shotgun to have gotten into the condition that it was in (because someone thought they could fix a loose magazine tube by welding), the shotgun would’ve had to have seen significant use.  That means, “significant wear”.

 

 You are going to have to put some time and effort into dismantling the gun, putting each part, screw, pin, in a small plastic bag and labeling it.  See if you can find a parts list and drawing for the shotgun on the Internet.  Label the parts with the part name and part number from whatever drawing you find.   Clean all the parts as you dismantle the weapon.    OK, you now have some experience in  dismantling a Winchester ‘97.

 

NOW, find an original WINCHESTER-made, Win97 in good condition and shoot that in competition.  Use the parts from this worn out piece to keep your competition shotgun running.  Or, you could sell the parts individually or in “ assemblies” on eBay.

 

Other shooters here can provide info as to what to look for when purchasing a Win97 for CAS.   You could also look for YouTube videos as well. There may be a video there that specifically gives you tips on inspecting-for-purchase a Winchester ‘97.

 

Cat Brules

Link to post
Share on other sites

One suggestion.  When you're looking for a 97 carry two shells, one a dummy round and the other a shotgun shell that has already been fired (preferably from a '97), and fired, not reloaded as a blank.  When you see a '97 you're interested in, (with the seller's permission) rack the slide so the port is open and the carrier down, then load the fired round in by hand.  You'll have to start it into the chamber as far as you can, but if it won't go don't force it because you could jam the gun up.  Then close the slide and put the hammer down, so everything is setting just as if you had fired the round.  Now rack the slide again, and that shell should pop out and eject a good distance.  Now load the dummy round into the loading tube and work the slide, and the dummy round should feed.  If either of those things don't happen, or don't work fairly smoothly, you're going to need to do some work and probably find some parts.  If you do buy one, take it apart and CLEAN it.  Good luck, they're fun guns to play with, but each one has its own personality.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/9/2019 at 8:08 PM, dannyvp said:

I have a friend who found this is his dads closet and he knew I was looking for one.

 

it very hard to cycle right now due to no oil, and it still has a full length barrel. 

 

 

Its probably hard to cycle for various reasons, more so than just a lack of oiling.

 

As others have suggested, it might be a good parts gun, if you can get it cheap.

 

Have you tried the Classifieds or try to contact Outlaw Gambler.   If I were looking for a 

good, reliable 97 right now, I would get with Outlaw Gambler.

 

..........Widder

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

My .02 worth.  Tell your friends that you have some concerns and offer to take it to a gunsmith.  Let the offer go from there.  I’ve seen some items that look like beaten dog crap on the outside, but the inner workings are another story.  Does he have any more firearms “just lying in the closet” or are they treated better?  Could be a reason his dad didn’t want to get rid of it(ie. grand fathers, very significant friend/family member, etc).  

Link to post
Share on other sites

 Of course I can’t see the weapon to know anything about it for sure. However if the mag tube was welded up and the gun can’t be taken apart it almost certainly means that the mag tube was coming loose and would not properly stay in place. For that to happen that means that the threads on the magazine tube, and probably the receiver are worn so badly that the gun, as I said, won’t stay together. That means the gun is worn out. I would not try to fix this gun to shoot It.  

 

 As I said, I have not seen the gun. However, it’s in pretty rough shape from the looks of the photographs. You can do a lot better for yourself. Make sure you buy a Winchester model 97 that’s fully functional and without a sloppy front end.    If you can get this rough weapon cheap, and use it as parts-support for a good Win97 that you use to compete with, therein lies its value to you.   BUT, DON’T FORGET that the weapon has seen a lot of use. Many of the other parts that are in it may also be worn to one degree or another, but the screws, pins, non-wear parts, etc., could prove invaluable as support for your match weapon.   That is why you have to buy it very cheap.  I wouldn’t cave to paying significantly more than $25 (30-35 max., in my mind).   Check the serial number to see how old it is.

 

Cat Brules

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanx OLG.  I don’t check for that.  Just dumping thoughts onto the Wire then, I guess.

 

Cat Brules

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys, I finally met back up with the owner and he agreed with your concerns. 
I have him $30 for it. I will not shoot it,  but probably clean it up and hang it in my workshop area. If I even need a part, I’ll have it.

i do appreciate the time on the answering and replying. 
 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Whatever you do don’t be a stranger. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.