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Bloody Glen Bob

Screws for Uberti 1873 Rifle

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I just purchased a used Uberti 1873 rifle in 357/38. I want to replace all the soft screws with hardened screws. Who makes the highest quality hardened screws for this rifle? 

 

Also, one of the lever spring screws is not coming loose at this point. I'm using hollow ground screwdrivers, but no luck so far. I've tried various things, and getting very frustrated. Any help is greatly appreciated. 

Thanks

Bloody Glen Bob

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I have a new Uberti 1873 and one of my spring screws was stuck right out of the box. I've broken two hollow ground screw drivers trying to get it out with no luck. Your best bet is to find a real good gunsmith/machinist and let them get it out and replace it. Badly stuck gun screws take special skills so as not to damage the rifle.

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VTI gunparts. They have hardened screws for Uberti and others. Look up their website. They have schematics and part numbers on them. They have been good people to work with so far for me 

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Contact VTI gun parts.  The link to what you want is listed below.

 

https://www.vtigunparts.com/store/shopdisplayproducts.asp?id=42&cat=Uberti+1873+Rifle

 

Maybe one of our very good cowboy gunsmiths will chime in on the best way loosen that stubborn screw.  All my new rifles go to my cowboy gunsmith to be tuned and short stroked before I ever play with them.  I let him deal with that type of problem. 

 

Graybeard was quicker on the trigger than I was, but he was right on.

Edited by TN Mongo, SASS #61450

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You have two ways to get the Lever Side Spring Screw out.  Method # 1.)   A quarter inch drive impact tool (or 3/8th drive).   Method # 2.)   With the side plates off, use a punch to turn the screw out to the side so it pops off the frame.  Once the side stress that is binding the threads is released the screw will come out nicely.

 

BEFORE you put the side springs back in, re-shape the back of the spring boss to match the shape of the frame curve.  You want to prevent the spring boss from cocking.  It must fit flat to the frame.

Edited by Colorado Coffinmaker
Correct a Spell

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Try relieving the spring pressure by removing the side covers and links, put a small tipped screwdriver bit under the lever springs (raising them).  This will allow the lever screw to be removed, then remove the two small screwdriver bits, this relaxes the springs.  Then use an impact driver if a screwdriver of the correct size wont work.  

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Like others have recommended.. Impact screw driver..

Since you are going to replace them with hardened screws..

I had a little luck of using a small pin punch and putting it on the

side of the screw head slot and tap it to relieve the initial torque..

 

Rance ;)

Thinkin I have used this method:blink::wacko:

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Even w/ hardened screws ... it is difficult to keep a screwdriver on those guys ... especially at a match.

Sooooooooooo ... if you are gonna replace them ... why not just replace them with socket head screws. I picked up a bag at Brownells ... you need #6-40 ... The ones I bought were 3/8 inch long and I had to trim the one on the lifter spring side just a tad ... but no biggie ... Get a bag and share them with your friends. 

A bag of 12 from Brownells is part number 080-574-643 ... they have 1/4 inchers too. -_- 

 

springscrewA.jpg.30ed173bae6170655eb5a9d044ca3193.jpg 

 

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I just took the side plates off and with a screw driver, I slid the springs off the shelf that they sit on so that they stick out the side, and with no tension on them, the screws came out easy enough.  I put a couple of layers of masking tape where the spring end would ride off the shelf to protect the finish.  Maybe I was lucky, but it was easy for me.

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6 hours ago, Bloody Glen Bob said:

Also, one of the lever spring screws is not coming loose at this point. I'm using hollow ground screwdrivers, but no luck so far. I've tried various things, and getting very frustrated. Any help is greatly appreciated. 

The lever and lifter springs are under considerable tension from the springs.  They often strip before they release.   Usually, if you CAREFULLY place a wide screwdriver under the spring and a second narrower screwdriver inside the spring near the lever articulation point, then twist the lower driver to GENTLY raise the spring clear of the articulation, then twist the smaller driver to pivot the spring toward the outside, (off the lever articulation point), the screw can then usually be easily removed.  Do NOT just slide the tensioned spring off the articulation point, or you will round the sharp edges needed to hold the spring in place.  Always lift it off with the lower (wide) screwdriver.  

After initial adjustment, I very seldom move the adjusting screws. To disassemble the action, I simply GENTLY, as above, release the springs, and replace them in the same manner, with two screwdrivers.   ALWAYS put a dab of grease on the articulation surfaces of both springs.   

 

Replacement hardened screws are available from Taylor's. They are not inexpensive.   Even these can strip, if you try to back them out with the spring tension applied.  

Hope this is clear enough to be helpful.   If needed, I could post a photo of how to position the screwdrivers.  Don't be overly forceful.  Use just enough torque on the screwdrivers to lift and disconnect the springs.  

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Thanks for all the helpful comments. I did rotate the lever spring off the lever, but the screw still won't break loose. Very frustrating. I guess the next step is to use an impact, although I don't want to do that unless it's last resort. Would it help to apply heat to the screw or lever? 

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VTI was out of the hardened screws for months, but got a bunch in about 3 weeks ago.

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2 hours ago, Bloody Glen Bob said:

. I guess the next step is to use an impact, although I don't want to do that unless it's last resort. Would it help to apply heat to the screw or lever? 

Heat on a spring is not usually a good idea, unless you are OK with replacing the spring.   If you do apply heat, use something like an electric soldering iron that can be precisely controlled.  And put a wet paper towel over the spring.  Impact drivers are scary things around firearms.  You can do a real lot of damage in a short time, like slipping off the screw head and marring the finish, or twisting off the screw head and having to drill out the screw.  

 

Have you tried flooding it overnight with a penetrating lubricant like liquid wrench?   I'd certainly try everything I could think of before risking doing damage.  Keep in mind the principle that replaceable parts are made, in part, to be the sacrificial link in the chain.  The screws will usually fail before the threads in the receiver will strip. 

 

If you are at this stage of consideration, and you are not 100% assured of your skill level, then I suggest taking it to a Smith.  They are trained in numerous ways to overcome those kinds of issues, and they can usually fix whatever they screw up.  They can do things like TIG weld a lever onto the head of the screw--things you or I might not think of.   

Edited by Dusty Devil Dale

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I've had some success with tight screws using a drill press. Get the part set in a padded vise. Put the right size screw driver bit in the drill press chuck. DON'T TURN ON THE DRILL MOTOR! Just turn the chuck by hand while you hold downward pressure on the chuck with the drill press. Often the bumping action and the associated weight of the pully system will break the screw free.

 

Snakebite

Edited by Snakebite
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1 hour ago, Dusty Devil Dale said:

Heat on a spring is not usually a good idea, unless you are OK with replacing the spring.   If you do apply heat, use something like an electric soldering iron that can be precisely controlled.  And put a wet paper towel over the spring.  Impact drivers are scary things around firearms.  You can do a real lot of damage in a short time, like slipping off the screw head and marring the finish, or twisting off the screw head and having to drill out the screw.  

 

Have you tried flooding it overnight with a penetrating lubricant like liquid wrench?   I'd certainly try everything I could think of before risking doing damage.  Keep in mind the principle that replaceable parts are made, in part, to be the sacrificial link in the chain.  The screws will usually fail before the threads in the receiver will strip. 

 

If you are at this stage of consideration, and you are not 100% assured of your skill level, then I suggest taking it to a Smith.  They are trained in numerous ways to overcome those kinds of issues, and they can usually fix whatever they screw up.  They can do things like TIG weld a lever onto the head of the screw--things you or I might not think of.   

 

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I FINALLY got the screw to break free. I turned the lever bring to the inside of the receiver and it relieved all the tension. Now to get hardened screws. 

Thanks again for all the input and help!!

Bloody Glen Bob

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BGB,  Go back and read my last paragraph.  BEFORE you put the side springs back in the rifle, re-shape the back of the spring boss to clear the rifle frame or you'll just be doing the same waltz again.

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Just got mine loose too following the same process! New screws coming as well, thanks for the advise and help.  

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