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Another airplane question

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In Longmire's SPIRIT OF STEAMBOAT they are starting an old B25. The pilot tells the co-pilot to "mesh the starter".

 

I thought it was a typo - MASH the starter, as in push the button.

 

But then the co-pilot responds that the starter is meshed.

 

Whadaheck is MESHED?

 

Google ain't got a clue. Any of y'all?

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@Alpo

 

The term "mash" is an action verb.

The Starter Panel on a B25 indicates MESH as shown below.

 

2135124369_EngineStarterPanelB25.png.213faad07060a8b256999d4d59c1e374.png

 

It appears more prominent on the B17 Starter panel:

 

2009227782_EngineStarterPanelB17.png.f1e25a6be209a046948719c78b1db6c7.png

 

I tried to find a video showing the starting of a B25 where the term "MESH" was used; however, I didn't find one readily.

Instead, I did find the term used when starting a B17 engine. Skip to the 4:20 mark and be prepared to hear "...you hold the starter switch on while you're meshing it."

Hope this answers your question.

 

 

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UB:

    Thanks for the video.

     The 4.35 mark is where the use of "Mesh the starter is used".

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Thank you Lumpy.

 

Bob, that was an extremely interesting video, but while it showed MESH, it didn't say what the hell it meant. :)

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Found this explanation, which fits with the dialogue in the video.  The underlining is mine.

 

"There are three general types of inertia starters: hand, electric, and combination hand and electric. The operation of all types of inertia starters depends on the kinetic energy stored in a rapidly rotating flywheel for cranking ability. Kinetic energy is energy possessed by a body by virtue of its state of motion, which may be movement along a line or spinning action. In the inertia starter, energy is stored slowly during an energizing process by a manual hand crank or electrically with a small motor. The flywheel and movable gears of a combination hand electric inertia starter are shown in Figure 1. The electrical circuit for an electric inertia starter is shown in Figure 2. During the energizing of the starter, all movable parts within it, including the flywheel, are set in motion. After the starter has been fully energized, it is engaged to the crankshaft of the engine by a cable pulled manually or by a meshing solenoid that is energized electrically. When the starter is engaged, or meshed, flywheel energy is transferred to the engine through sets of reduction gears and a torque overload release clutch."  From Aircraftsystemstech.com

 

CS

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Dag nab it, ended up watching videos on B17's and this one on Flak - fascinating actually. My Uncle Ernie flew missions  on bombers in WWII and was killed over France when a another plane in the formation was shot down and hit his plane on the way down. 

 

 

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Can't watch the videos, but I believe it refers to meshing the gears together twixt the starter motor and the engine.  Count Sandor's exerpt seems to be saying the same thing.  I believe it's the same thing that happens when you start your car.  You turn the key and a solenoid energizes to extend the gear while at the same time the starter motor starts rotating.  Perhaps on those old planes the starter motor and gear connections are independent. 

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