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Trooper Ozzy

Remington 1882 10 gauge sxs what should I look for

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Who needs a 12 gauge?  Now I have a hammered gun to go with my 10 gauge 1887.  "E. Remington & Sons, Ilion, N.Y.", 1882 Remington Arms Co. 10 Gauge 30" Barrel Double Barrel Shotgun, Steel Barrels, casehardened locks, frame, and butt plate. Barrel and forearm marked 83. Serial number 6701.  Inbound this week. 

Warden Callaway or others, what should I inspect for first for function?

 

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Posted (edited)

So?  You've not inspected this gun?

 

I can see by the lower photo it's seen some backwoods gunsmithing.  The dings in the lock plate show someone tapped it back in place. Maybe because they warped it getting it out or in.  The washer under the hammer screw and screw itself is something that was improvised. 

 

First look to see if it's "on face",  this is is the barrels tight agains the breach block.  From a gun this old it's likely to have a little rattle. A lot says it needs rebult.

 

Check the ribs between the barrels to see if they are attached and solid. If they are loose or missing,  wallhanger.  If they appear tight,   you can do a "ring test".  Suspend the barrels as if they were a wind chime.  Lightly tap at intervals up and down the barrels. If joined solid, they will ring like a bell.  If they have a dull thud or a rattle,  something is loose you didn't see with visual examination. 

 

Open the action and see if the hammers cock and hold.  Take thumb and finger and push firing pins in to see if they actually move and protrude past breach face.   Some shotguns have springs to return, some use the closing action to push the pins back.  If they have springs, you should be able to feel them pushing in and they should retract.  Good chance springs will be clogged with dried oil and dirt and rust.  Look at points of firing pins to see if they look normal.  Old shotguns will have larger points on the firing pins.  Look to see if the end the hammer strikes are mushroomed.  

 

The hammers should hold in the safety notch.  If you have snap caps, the hammers should rebound to the safety notch. 

 

Bores will likely be at least dark.  It'll still be ok to shoot with a few light pits.  Really deep pits is not good.  Look for dints in the barrels.  The old twist barrels are thick and don't tend to dent like modern steel barrels.  

 

Check the wrist of the buttstock for cracks and repairs.  This is the weakest area and often have poor repairs.

 

Otherswise, complete and in working order.  Parts for these old guns are difficult to find and are probably worse than the part you have.

 

 

Edited by Warden Callaway
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Warden Callaway

All checks out, ring test good, bore almost shiny after cleaning. One hammer slightly bent, put back on line. Firing pins and other functions work cleanly. Before I booger it up, what is the next step to remove the side plates?

 

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The way I remove the side locks would be to replace the screw that goes into the left plate and screwes into the right plate.  Back the screw out a couple of turns.  Take something like a plastic or brass hammer and lightly tap on the screw head.  Look to see if there is any movement in the right plate. If it moved, turn the screw out another couple turns and repeat.  Hopefully,  the right lock will break loose.   It'll be hooked in the front and kind of hinge out.  Now take a brass punch and put it through the right side and tap the left side lock out of place.  I may have been lucky but it's always worked for me.  

 

I took the locks out of this Liberty hammer double and put them back in.  

 

 

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Tie it to a tire with a long string - charge each shell with 109gr Fg powder.  Go behind your truck and pull the triggers with your string.  If it's all in one piece - Your Good to Go :D

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31 minutes ago, John Boy said:

Tie it to a tire with a long string - charge each shell with 109gr Fg powder.  Go behind your truck and pull the triggers with your string.  If it's all in one piece - Your Good to Go :D

Why such a light charge... there's plenty of room left in the brass shell

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Shells

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What a great idea. Worked perfectly.  The insides were clean and sears crisp with almost no wear... didn't look 137 years old.  Hammers tweaked, firing pins free and striking; need to load some brass shells for tomorrow. Might have a match day shooter here. I will work on those hammer springs next; these are stout. 

Thanks for your help.

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Because the 12 gauge just isn't big enough...

48668539061_93d98b87db_b.jpg48668194053_5993b654a7_b.jpg

 

45's not bad

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Pistol too

48668193943_064ae8a794_b.jpg

 

Edited by Trooper Ozzy
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Hey Trooper! Look what I found on YouTube!

 

 

Guy makes a top snap spring for 1882 Remington.  In the process, he shows taking the gun apart. 

 

The only thing I've done different was the way I've removed the trigger plate once the screws were out.  I come down through the "water table" with a brass punch and tap the trigger plate loose.   He just banged on the vice or workbench. 

 

This guy has many gunsmithing videos. 

 

 

Edited by Warden Callaway
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Welcome to the 10 gauge fraternity. The BP smoke and flames are memorable and are incredibly fun!!!

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Why such a light charge... there's plenty of room left in the brass shell

Why?  Because it is the Normal powder charges for 10ga and use Fg grade powder

What is YOUR RECOMMNDED powder charge & what grade of powder?

Use a powder wad to fill up the space in a brass hull

10 8 Blank 1 thin card wad over powder; nothing else
10 4 1 Light
10 4 1 1/4 Normal
10 4 1/2 1 1/2 Heavy

 

Conversion Table
Drams
avdp
Grains
avdp
Grams
1 27 1.77
2 55 3.54
3 82 5.31
3 1/8 85 5.53
3 1/4 89 5.76
3 1/2 96 6.20
3 3/4 103 6.64
4 109 7.08
Edited by John Boy

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53 minutes ago, John Boy said:

Why?  Because it is the Normal powder charges for 10ga and use Fg grade powder

What is YOUR RECOMMNDED powder charge & what grade of powder?

Use a powder wad to fill up the space in a brass hull

 

Easy there pard...coming late to the party.

FYI

I run qty (2) 3.4 cc dippers FFG (100 grains), Circle Fly .125 over the powder card, Circle Fly .500 fiber wad over that, 1.25 oz reclaimed 7.5, Circle Fly .025 over shot card hot glued in place.

 

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Edited by Trooper Ozzy
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Ozzy - your brass hulls look just like my 12ga's that go on the box and the loading recipe IMO is one to be proud of. I'm a hot glue user fan too

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4 minutes ago, John Boy said:

Ozzy - your brass hulls look just like my 12ga's that go on the box and the loading recipe IMO is one to be proud of. I'm a hot glue user fan too

 

I wish they only cost like a 12 gauge!  $7 and change each.

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I wish they only cost like a 12 gauge!  $7 and change each.

If ya wanna dance, ya gotta pay the fiddler

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Recoil pad? :rolleyes: Perhaps standing on a skateboard with a large spring behind your back, backed up to a stout tree!  You know, to shove you back into battery!:D

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1 hour ago, Trailrider #896 said:

Recoil pad? :rolleyes: Perhaps standing on a skateboard with a large spring behind your back, backed up to a stout tree!  You know, to shove you back into battery!:D

 

I don't load my 10 gauge shotguns very heavy but they all weigh about 10 pounds and have nice,  large buttplates.  So the kick is not very manageable.  

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17 hours ago, Trailrider #896 said:

Recoil pad? :rolleyes: Perhaps standing on a skateboard with a large spring behind your back, backed up to a stout tree!  You know, to shove you back into battery!:D

The recoil is far less then most people think, between the weight of the gun (my Spanish 10 g double weighs about 12-13 pounds) and the black powder, even my heavy loads are mostly a giant shove, even when I pull both triggers at once.  :D

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