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Rufus Cogburn

1851 Richards Mason Conversion in .38 Special, 7.5”

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Posted (edited)

BNIB, never fired.  This is not your ordinary ‘51 conversion.  First, it’s in Charcoal Blue.  Next, it is stamped 1872 on the barrel but it’s not an Open Top. The rear sight is a notch in the hammer.  Third, the box says box label says ‘51 R-Mason.

 

At any rate, the Charcoal Blue and color case hardened frame make this a very pretty pistol.  $500 (It retailed at $649.99).  NOW $450.00


Contact Rufus at: rg@rufuscogburn.us 

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Edited by Rufus Cogburn

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Only asking because I don't know, Rufus.

You said it's not an Open Top.

Why? Looking to get an education.

 

Waimea

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4 minutes ago, Waimea said:

Only asking because I don't know, Rufus.

You said it's not an Open Top.

Why? Looking to get an education.

 

Waimea

Waimea. Unless I’m misinformed, in order to be an Open Top, the rear sights must be above the forcing cone of the barrel, just ahead on the cylinder.  The rear sights on this pistol is a groove cut into the hammer as with all Colt percussion revolvers.  Also, the frame of the Open Top doesn’t have filler piece with the loading gate that takes up the space where the percussion nipples where cut off of the cylinder.  The cylinder of the Open Top is longer and the frame has the loading gate incorporated into the blast shield. Check the distance from the bolt stop to the rear of the cylinder on each model.  The Open Top is the top image, my pistol is the bottom image.

 

Hope this helps.  I may be wrong, but, you’ll never convince me of that.  LOL

 

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Posted (edited)

Gentlemen: If I can impose for a moment in an effort to "clear the air" over naming and design.

 

Significant Colt Revolvers from 1836 to 1873:

1836 - Colt Paterson Revolver - .36 caliber

1847 to 1849 - Various pocket-sized Colt revolvers (Baby Dragoon, Wells Fargo, etc.) - .31 caliber

1847 to 1860 - Large frame "horse pistols", or "Dragoons" intended for use by U.S. Cavalry, the Whitneyville-Hartford (Walker) followed by three different slightly- improved models, the 1st, 2nd and 3rd Model Dragoons - all .44 caliber

1851 - Colt Navy Revolver - .36 caliber

1860 - Colt Army Revolver - .44 caliber

1861 - Colt New Navy Revolver - .36 caliber

1862 - Colt Pocket Police - .31 caliber

 

All of the above were designed with an "open top" over the cylinder. When converted (and they all have been at one point or another) for cartridges they were called by their original model name or date, usually (but not always) followed by the relevant conversion patents names, as in Richards-Mason.

 

Following the U.S. Civil War Colt had a couple of years worth of parts with very few new sales. a decision was made to use as many pre-made parts as possible to make their own "conversions while they designed a completely new cartridge revolver. These changes begat the following:

 

1871 to 1872 - Colt's Open Top Revolver - .44 Henry rimfire cartridge

1873 - Colt's Single Action Army Pistol - offered in 9 different factory calibers with other calibers available as special orders.

 

I hope this helps clear up the confusion about names, nicknames and models.

 

Burlesonbill, keeping the plains of Texas clear of roaming Comanche and Kiowa for 67 years now.

Edited by burlesonbill
typo
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Posted (edited)

Thank you Burleson Bill. The Conversion came FIRST. The open top came AFTER Colt converted all the 1851s they had left over from the Civil War and before the design for the 1873 Single Action Army.   Also, all the Open Tops shown on Uberti’s website and Taylor’s website show all of the 1871 and 1872 models with round barrels only.  My Conversion has an octagon barrel.  (And, yes, I know Taylor’s are made by Uberti)

 

Now, general discussions about conversions vs open tops belong the the Wire forum. This forum is for sales and, yes, this one is still for sale. 

Edited by Rufus Cogburn

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Thanks, Rufus.

Hope you sell this fine firearm soon.

I have two and they are awesome.

 

Waimea

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This is a pair of Uberti ( Colt ) 1871-72 Open Top 44 Specials .

With a Uberti 1866  ( Winchester 1866 ) in 44 Special .

Just Sayin .

Rooster 

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23 minutes ago, Rooster Ron Wayne said:

This is a pair of Uberti ( Colt ) 1871-72 Open Top 44 Specials .

With a Uberti 1866  ( Winchester 1866 ) in 44 Special .

Just Sayin .

Rooster 

 2002772728_2017-01-1418_16_25.thumb.jpg.a467480c07e496b938113c5a1f8e2709.jpg

 

You’re exactly right!!  I can see the rear sights on the barrel.  Just sayin’.

 

Rufus

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Very nice!  I didn’t realize there were any repro’s out there in this configuration. I was just reading about the ‘71-‘72 open tops. According to the article that I read, during the first few months of manufacture, these were made with the sight on the hammer just like the previous cap and ball models but was soon changed to a frame mounted sight channel.  

I just found a good video of Mike Bellevue where he compares the uberti 1860, Cimarron ASM 1st gen conversion and the Uberti 2 model Richards conversion.  If the details he spells out about these guns is true to history, then it pretty much contradicts the info I read in the article. 

Either way, that is a great pistol. Wish I had the extra funds. Hope it moves quick for ya 

-Idaho Bob 

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And my apologies Rufus. I just read your comment about wanting to keep the discussions elsewhere. I’ve always been good at making myself look like the south end of a northbound mule!  

-Idaho Bob. 

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No prob, Bob. At least my ad is getting traffic. 

 

Ive attached the label on the box so y’all can see what Cimarron calls this thing. 

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Two of my 4 Cimarron '51 conversions are charcoal blue, and I absolutely love the finish.  Some folks say charcoal blue wears too quickly, but mine have seen moderate use (3000 rounds or so each) for 15 years and the blue is still in good shape with only moderate wear.  The grips are where charcoal blue wears the fastest, but these conversions have brass gripframes, so no problemo there!

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5 hours ago, Abilene, SASS # 27489 said:

Two of my 4 Cimarron '51 conversions are charcoal blue, and I absolutely love the finish.  Some folks say charcoal blue wears too quickly, but mine have seen moderate use (3000 rounds or so each) for 15 years and the blue is still in good shape with only moderate wear.  The grips are where charcoal blue wears the fastest, but these conversions have brass gripframes, so no problemo there!

 

Yep, that Charcoal Blue just sets off the color case hardening.

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