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Warden Callaway

Uberti replica of S&W New model #3?

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I have a pair. As of yet I am not shooting them in competition. My holsters are ordered so. It likely will be sooner than later before I start. 

I put 50 rounds through them Saturday and they point well for me and are very accurate. If you have specific questions I can try to answer them.

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Not really.  Just looking to see if they are really out there.  

 

Have you compared then to the Schofield?  The grip is different from the Russian and Schofield. 

 

Are you planning to shoot black powder or subs? 

 

I'd like them in 44WCF as it was the caliber it was introduced in. But that's too much to ask for.

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Posted (edited)

Still has the annoying "adjustable" sights, which means you can't use it in some categories.   Why do they do that? I have 2 Smith and Wesson New Model 3's, one with the adjustable sights and the other with fixed.  To be honest, I can see no real difference between them.  I also have an Uberti Scofield.   Yes, the grips are very different, and I prefer the NM3 grips.   They just fit my hands more comfortably.  

 

And I can't believe I am gonna beat Driftwood on this....

 

A Scofield

Schofield.thumb.jpg.f8e96494574476d012010cf76c0a7c38.jpg

 

A New Model 3 with target sights

671060184_NewModel3.thumb.jpg.990d07be4a414203ad16d155f448a41f.jpg

 

The differences in the grips are quite noticeable.  But you may also notice that the basic shape of the NM3 is pretty similar to the grips on some smaller frame modern made Smith and Wessons to this day.   They found a good shape and stuck with it.  I don't have a Russian to post a pic of, [but Driftwood does] and as I am sure he will point out, the Russian has a much more pronounced knuckle above the grip.   But the grips themselves are not all that different from these.   You may also notice that the front sight is different on my original than on the Taylor in the video.   The above pistol is specifically a target model, chambered for .38-44, basically an elongated .38 S&W.

 

Below is an original with standard sights.

Model34440.thumb.JPG.14d7054d6da71dce588ef33a4d5060ad.JPG

 

On this 44-40 pistol, the rear sight is towards the front of the latch, rather than the back as on the target model, and you can see how the half moon sight is like what is on the replica.

 

Finally, there was one other pistol on the model 3 frame...

 

Model3DA.thumb.jpg.1dd5d36ff14813dec00bb80a2fcf055a.jpg

 

The model 3 DA had the same grips and sights as on the standard NM3.  It also had a great DA trigger.

 

As far as the Taylor goes, I am sure it's a well made pistol, and if they limiting factor of the adjustable sights does not bother you, and if you like these top break designs, I'd say get one.   They are fun to shoot, and less expensive than originals.   They can also handle smokeless powder, but not black.  The opposite of the originals.

 

Good luck.

 

 

Edited by H. K. Uriah, SASS #74619
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I have a pair in 45 colt.  They are fun to shoot.  I normally shoot duelist,  but because of the "adjustable" sites I shoot Senior.

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Posted (edited)

OK, I'm here now HK.

 

First a disclaimer. I do not own any Uberti Top Breaks, mine are all originals. Here is my pair of New Model Number Threes. The blued one shipped to Japan in 1896, the nickel plated one shipped in 1882 and was factory refinished in 1965. Both are chambered for 44 Russian.

 

New%20Model%20Number%20Three%20Blue%2031

 

 

 

 

First off, Mike's video is very instructive. Notice he had to regrip for every shot. This is because the hammer configuration of all S&W No. 3 Top Breaks is very different than a Colt. If you're shooting one handed, you have to reach further with your thumb to get a grip on the hammer spur than with a Colt. I find this to be true of all the large Number Three Top Breaks.

 

I always shoot a Colt with my pinky curled under the grip. I have fairly large hands and I can reach the hammer to cock it this way.

 

Holding%20a%20Colt%2002_zpsx2mqjvq8.jpg

 

 

 

 

It's a different story with a Schofield. Notice I cannot quite reach the hammer spur with my pinky under the grip.

 

Gripping%20Schofield%2002_zpsbj5nsuhv.jp

 

 

 

 

In order to reach the hammer spur of the Schofield I have to choke up and get my entire hand onto the grip.

 

Gripping%20Schofield%2004_zpsj7bwpucj.jp

 

 

 

 

I noticed Mike was keeping his entire hand on the grip, he did not curl his pinky under the grip. Even so, he was regripping for every shot.

 

Gripping%20Schofield%2001_zpsqafls47t.jp

 

 

 

Gripping%20Schofield%2003_zpsav3qagpe.jp

 

 

 


In my very humble opinion, the Russian model is the worst of the big Number Three Top Breaks to shoot. The Russians specified that big pointy hump on the grip because they did not want the gun to roll in the hand in recoil. It does this very well, the gun does not rotate at all in recoil. 

 

Gripping%20Russian%2001_zpsoehwfkga.jpg

 

 

 

 

However I cannot reach the hammer spur with my hand below the hump. I have to regrip, placing the palm of my hand directly onto the pointy hump, in order to cock the hammer.

 

Gripping%20Russian%2002_zpsiirfxkqw.jpg

 

 

 

 

Then I have to remember to shift my grip back again under the hump. If I forget and fire the revolver with my hand in contact with the pointy hump, it hurts! Even with a relatively mild cartridge such as the 44 Russian. I can imagine how much it would hurt with a modern replica chambered for 45 Colt.

 

Gripping%20Russian%2003_zpsjtk86kbd.jpg

 

 

 

 

Of all the single action Number Three Top Breaks, (there were actually four, I am not including the American Model, yet) I think the New Model Number Three is the most pleasant to shoot.

 

Gripping%20New%20Model%20Number%20Three%

 

 

 

 

No, with my pinky under the grip hold I cannot quite reach the hammer.

 

Gripping%20New%20Model%20Number%20Three%

 

 

 

 

But the much smaller hump of the New Model Number Three allows the grip to rotate slightly in my hand so I can reach the hammer as the pistol rotates in my hand during recoil.

 

Gripping%20New%20Model%20Number%20Three%

 

 

 

 

Then I regrip, just as Mike was doing, for the shot.

 

Note: Even though I am demonstrating with originals, if you have hands the same size as me, it will be the same with a replica.

 

 

 

 

Next, Mike mentions the Uberti replica shoots really high.

 

They all do! The originals did too!

 

Notice how low the front sights are on these originals.

 

Russian, 2nd Model.

 

Russian%202nd%20Model%20with%2044%20Russ

 

 

 

 

Schofield, 1st model.

 

schofield02_zps140a93d1.jpg

 

 

 

 

New Model Number Three

 

New%20Model%20Number%20Three%20Blue%2031

 

 

 

 

Notice how much taller the front sight is on a Colt or Clone. When you aim, you are actually depressing the barrel a bit to get the sight on target. As the gun begins to recoil before the bullet exits the barrel, the bore lifts up a bit, putting the shot where you aimed. Not so with a S&W Top Break. If I don't remember to hold low on the target, I sometimes shoot right over the top. That's why Mike had to hold low, the front sights on the replicas are just as low as on the originals.

 

Second%20Gen%2003_zps0in1bkez.jpg

 

 

 

 

OK, let's talk about Black Powder for a moment.

 

040.jpg

 

 

 

 

If you want to shoot Smokeless in a modern replica of a S&W Top Break you will be fine. Did you notice Mike started fussing with the gun towards the end? He was shooting Black Powder, and the Uberti Replica Top Breaks generally do not shoot Black Powder very well. It is because Uberti lengthened the cylinders of their Top Breaks, to accommodate cartridges such as 44-40 an 45 Colt, but did not lengthen the frame an equal amount. Instead they cut down the length of the bushing at the front of the cylinder, which does not do as good a job at shielding the cylinder arbor from BP fouling blasted out of the barrel cylinder gap. So ALL the Uberti Top Breaks tend to bind up relatively quickly when fired with Black Powder. I shoot nothing but Black Powder in my Top Breaks, and I can shoot them all day because S&W knew how to build a revolver that would function well with Black Powder.

 

 

Regarding what caliber, the great majority of New Model Number Threes were chambered for 44 Russian. Also, a whole bunch of other cartridges, as Mike mentioned. The Frontier Models, were chambered for 44-40 and a very few were chambered for 38-40. But Smith and Wesson did the right thing. The standard cylinder length for Top Breaks, beginning with the American Model, was 1 7/16". This worked fine with the 44 American Model, the Russian Models, and the Schofield. The great majority of New Model Number Threes also had 1 7/16" long cylinders. But to accommodate the longer 44-40 and 38-40 rounds, the cylinders were made 1 9/16" long. And here is where Uberti missed the boat. S&W lengthened the frames on these revolvers by 1/8" to accommodate the longer cylinders without compromising the bushing at the front of the cylinder.

 

Anyway, I have blabbed on long enough, my comments are about shooting the originals, but I think you will find they pertain to the modern replicas too.

Edited by Driftwood Johnson, SASS #38283
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3 hours ago, Driftwood Johnson, SASS #38283 said:

Anyway, I have blabbed on long enough, my comments are about shooting the originals, but I think you will find they pertain to the modern replicas too.

 

Thanks for blabbing!  

 

I'm just fascinated with all things mechanical.  I'll keep a watch out for a new model 3 at my local store.  

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FYI:

Quote

The Beretta “Laramie” rear latch with the adjustable rear sight may be replaced with the rear latch (with fixed sight) from the “Russian” Model to be allowed as a fixed sight model revolver. 

SHB p.36

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10 hours ago, Driftwood Johnson, SASS #38283 said:

Anyway, I have blabbed on long enough, my comments are about shooting the originals, but I think you will find they pertain to the modern replicas too.

 

I honestly think I could listen (read) to you all day.  Thanks for the post and pictures!

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1 hour ago, PaleWolf Brunelle, #2495L said:

FYI:

SHB p.36

They seem to be hard to find. I have had two on back order with VTI since January. 

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Picture of the pair and a comparison with an original 

26D13E19-8631-45CB-969E-28807CC9467F.jpeg

71D1E6E5-1127-44D8-9DC4-19BF66A6AAE0.jpeg

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Thanks for posting, Driftwood.   Question, you've got a Model 3 DA, right?   How do you find cocking that one SA style?  For it it's pretty easy.  Easier than the SA pistols in fact.

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