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Alpo

Military ID card question

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Does it have your rank on it? So every time you get promoted you need to get a new card?

 

If it does not list your rank, does it at least say whether you are an officer or enlisted?

 

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Second question. How old does a dependent child need to be to get a card these days?

 

You had to be 11 when I was a kid, but then, I didn't get a Social Security card until I was 14, and now you get them at birth, and you used to could put your kids on your passport, but now they have to have their own, even if they are little babies.

 

Thought maybe the rules might have change for ID cards also.

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When I was in, ok I was only an aide to Caesar, the card expired in three years or so and had a rank on it. One did not get a new card with a change in rank unless one “lost” the card.

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Posted (edited)

When I was in, military ID had no rank but did denote enlisted or officer.

But that was 1954 to 1958, l-o-n-g time ago so I could dis-remember stuff.

Edited by Tascosa, SASS# 24838
added somethig

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Posted (edited)

The current ID ( Common Access Card) has rank and pay grade. It also has a computer chip.

Edited by Utah Bob #35998

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Posted (edited)

IIRC everytime you gained rank in the Navy you got an new ID card.  Didn't do it that day but had to get it done within a short period after the date of advancement.  If you lost rank you got a new ID card that same day.

 

I checked my retired ID card and my wife's Dependant ID card and both have my rank at the time of retirement on them.

 

From the Tricare website

 

Quote

 

ID Cards for Children

 

Children under age 10 can usually use a parent's or guardian's ID card.

At age 10, the sponsor must get an ID card for the child.

Children under age 10 should have their own ID card when in the custody of a parent or guardian who is not eligible for TRICARE or who is not the custodial parent after a divorce.  

 

 

ID cards issued after 1 June 2011 no longer have your SSN on them. Instead they have a DoD Identification number on them.

 

If you are on Active Duty you will be issued a Common Access Card (CAC) if not active duty but eligible for access to some or all military benefits or services you will be issued a Uniformed Services ID Card.

Edited by Sedalia Dave

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Next question. What do y'all (them what's got one) call the dang thing?

 

Current book I'm reading, it's the fall of 2003. The hero, 18, is home on "I survived basic" leave. He had heard that one liquor store would sell to military even if they were underage. When the man asked for ID, he "showed him my Common Access Card".

 

In Griffin's books he consistently referred to it as an AGO (GAO? AOG? pretty sure it was some combination of those three letters) card.

 

In early 2001 a guy I worked with, just out of the Air Force but in the Reserve, called it a Red Cross card or Geneva card or POW card, or something like that.

 

I had a dependent card for about 10 years. My father had one for about 45 years that I knew him. Mama had one for about 55.

 

We all just called it an ID card. If we were being really uptown, we said "Military ID Card".

 

 

 

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During my 28 years on Active Duty, it was simply called a Military ID Card.  It also gave access to all of the NATO allied countries in Europe when border crossing still required Passports (Pre EU days).  Now, mine is just a Retired Military ID Card.  I have never heard it referred to as a "Common Access Card" as I haven't been on an active military instillation in many years.

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The Aussie card has Name, Rank and Serial Number (we call it a PMKeys number).

 

Not sure about Kids age but given on most bases now there is no family accomodation and we dont have PX's or Commisaries its not a big issue, I would guess they get one if they are old enough to come and go alone?

 

We call ours ID Cards.

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Cyrus Cassidy can probably tell us. Well, not probably. Definitely.

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The reference was for CAC card as mentioned above and 2003 was probably close to when they came out.  

 

Military ID was what referred to, and it would also have your Geneva Convention category on the card....which would define if could be subjected to manual labor or other treatment.

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Posted (edited)

We called ours our “Military ID card.”

 

Edited: My ID had my rating - GMM2. It also had my name and SSN along with my ship’s seal adhered to the outside of the laminate. When I got out and then they gave me a pink Reserve Military ID. I still have it somewhere. 

Edited by Pat Riot, SASS #13748

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2 minutes ago, JD Lud said:

The reference was for CAC card as mentioned above and 2003 was probably close to when they came out.  

 

Military ID was what referred to, and it would also have your Geneva Convention category on the card....which would define if could be subjected to manual labor or other treatment.

:D mine may have something about whether or not I could be subjected to manual labor but regardless, no one paid any attention. We did get subjected to manual labor. :lol:

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The often maligned CAC. They’re looking to improve the system.

How about a tattoo with a hologram? ;)

https://fcw.com/articles/2017/08/14/dod-cac-replacement-carberry.aspx?m=2

 

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I am a current Active Guard Reserve (AGR) in the Air Guard. It is a Common Access Card (CAC). It does have a chip. It does have rank on it. I do not get a new card upon promotion. I historically only do it when it stops communicating with my work computer. 

We generally refer to it as an I.D.

 

Damn it. I answered an Alpo question about the accuracy of some authors research. 

 

I must be be really bored.

  • Haha 1

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When I came into the Army Reserve in 1988, I was given a green ID card. After Basic and AIT, I turned it in and was issued a pink ID for Reserve / Guard components. When I was again on active duty during Desert Shield / Storm, I was issued a green ID card, along with a separate Geneva Convention card listing me as a "non-combatant" (medical personnel). Return to Reserve status, another pink ID. Got out, came back into the National Guard, another pink ID. That was eventually replaced by the CAC card. Got my twenty year letter and retired, and received a pink "gray area retiree" card, similar to the old ones, but with scannable information. I can get onto Wright-Patterson and the like with it. Once I turn 59, I will be issued yet another ID as a full retiree. Or at least that is the current plan. Whew!

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The modern CAC (Common Access Card) has my rank on it.  They also have a computer chip which we use to unlock / use DoD-owned computers.  So I literally cannot do anything on the computer without my ID card.  The certificates associated with the computer chip are tied to my rank, so yes, every time I get promoted I need a new card.  

 

That's a problem I'm willing to put up with.

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Do you still need a password, or does the computer think, "This is Cyrus' card, therefore it MUST BE Cyrus", and let you in?

 

Because if it works that way, it does not appear to be extremely secure.

 

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13 minutes ago, Alpo said:

Do you still need a password, or does the computer think, "This is Cyrus' card, therefore it MUST BE Cyrus", and let you in?

 

Because if it works that way, it does not appear to be extremely secure.

 

There is a PIN associated with the card.  So you would have to have my card and know my PIN to make it work.

 

We are also signing documents this way, too.  Anyone can forge a signature, but you need my card and PIN to forge a digital one.

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55 minutes ago, Cyrus Cassidy #45437 said:

The modern CAC (Common Access Card) has my rank on it.  They also have a computer chip which we use to unlock / use DoD-owned computers.  So I literally cannot do anything on the computer without my ID card.  The certificates associated with the computer chip are tied to my rank, so yes, every time I get promoted I need a new card.  

 

That's a problem I'm willing to put up with.

When you make 0-7 you probably won’t need a pin or chip. The computer will recognize your awesome presence and give you whatever you want. :lol:

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1 hour ago, Utah Bob #35998 said:

When you make 0-7 you probably won’t need a pin or chip. The computer will recognize your awesome presence and give you whatever you want. :lol:

You have WAAAAY more confidence in both me and computers for that sentence to make any realistic sense!

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