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Capt. James H. Callahan

Anyone done a DNA test? Surprises?

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12 hours ago, Utah Bob #35998 said:

My sister did the test. We were always told our maternal great grandmother was a full blood Cherokee. Her test revealed zero percentage of native American genetics. She was disappointed.  :lol:

I haven’t done mine. There would be differences as me and my sis had different dads. 

 

 

 

Their "Native American" gene profile is aimed mainly at Central and South America, not North America.  See http://www.thegenealogyreporter.com/native-american-dna-test/

https://support.ancestry.com/s/question/0D5150000224MpQCAU/my-dna-testing-shows-no-native-american

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Although I haven't done mine, I'm sure some of mine would come back with equal amounts of

German and Irish, with a smidgin of Moonshine, as grandpa was a well known moonshiner

back in the TN hills many moons ago...... :lol:

 

..........Widder

 

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5 minutes ago, Widder, SASS #59054 said:

Although I haven't done mine, I'm sure some of mine would come back with equal amounts of

German and Irish, with a smidgin of Moonshine, as grandpa was a well known moonshiner

back in the TN hills many moons ago...... :lol:

 

..........Widder

 

If he was the Irishman that would be potcheen. More properly poitin. ;)

JHC

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Oh...

 

To answer the OP question, yes.  

It was pretty much as expected,  saving not showing any American Indian but instead showing Iberian Peninsula and a touch of Central Africa,  the two added together adding to the 12% that should have been American Indian.   

 

We do get periodic updates that help refine things.   Again,  it pretty well supports what my folks had told me. 

 

We used the Ancestry version.   I like that one of the features is a time line showing migration patterns and connections within them.

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Yes, The results were very much different than what I grew up knowing.

Native American % was lots lower than I was led to believe and hoped for. 

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My DNA showed more English and less German than I expected. It also found a daughter of my brother that he didn't know about.

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Yes. for me It was neat knowing that all the history in the books on my family was correct. (my results in the photo)

 

Even better - my wife was adopted in Los Angeles from an agency that is long gone and records lost. There was the littlest chance she was ever going to find her birth mother. Before her adopted mother passed she told her the last name of the person she remembers giving her up for adoption was 'Sexton' immediately when she was born. Anyway my wife had the DNA done two years ago she reached out to a couple of folks that matched one being a second cousin. After not hearing anything since that time she just about gave up hope. There was a spark, but it faded....

then a little over a week ago.....she received a message on AncestryDNA....it was her birth mother. The DNA was a perfect match. Her biological mother had given birth to my wife when she was in high school at age 17. Both she and her boyfriend felt they needed to give her up in hopes that the little girl would have a good life. Here is the good part. Yes, my wife was raised well by her adoptive parents and their family.....she being the youngest in that family. As it turns out...my wife's biological mom and her biological father (last name Sexton) married a couple years into college and ended up having a couple more children. So, my wife not only found her birth mother, she found her birth father - who recently celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary. She also has a full blood brother and sister. She was the youngest in her adopted family, and now she is the older sister in her biological family. The really wonderful thing about this is the biological family has been wondering what happened all these years to their first born and all - including her young brother and sister -  have reached out to embrace my wife and are currently starting to email and talk with each other. They also are excited to know there is a granddaughter they would have never known they had :) It has been a true blessing.

 

So, I can see the DNA thing being not so good, but have witnessed it being a wonderful thing - just never know I guess.

 

GG~ :FlagAm:

save.JPG

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Hi Gunner,

 

I think your wife's story is one of those with a happy ending or maybe it is a happy beginning. It seems to indicate that for adoptees the benefits of DNA testing are real.

 

Hi Others,

 

I've been able to trace my mother's family on both my grandfather's and grandmother's sides back to the 1600s and 1400s respectively. My father's family is more mysterious or undocumented.

 

BTW I think I may be partly Vulcan ;) as my fingers sometimes stick like Spock's and I have to pull them apart. :o Really! "Live long and prosper!"

 

Regards,

 

Allie

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11 hours ago, J-BAR #18287 said:

If an ethnic marker is present only on one chromosome then only about half of that person’s descendants will inherit that marker.  All of Mom’s 46 chromosomes and all of Dad’s 46 chromosomes are shaken and stirred before 23 of them get packaged into an ovum or sperm cell.  Each of us only get half of each parent’s genetic material, and siblings get different halves.  Lack of an ethnic marker in one individual  does not prove the absence of that ethnicity in the family.  You would have to study the DNA of everyone in the family to draw meaningful conclusions.

I

11 hours ago, J-BAR #18287 said:

 

 

Well, not quite.  The markers reside on mitochondrial DNA which is passed down maternally so all children would receive said markers from their mother.  A son couldn't pass that marker on.

 

  I have a similar story to some of the above in that the lore of my wifes family included a Cherokee great grandmother.  My wifes mother even had a Cherokee name.  The  results came back zilch for my wife and daughter and for two of her cousins.  What I think happened is that way back there in East Texas her ancestors either sheltered a Cherokee  or had live-in spouse that produced no children who the young kids called granny.    Anyone who even resembled an Indian back in the late 1800's was suspect and subject for removal to Indian Territory.  Sometimes members were protected by declaring they were dark because of their Black Dutch ethnicity.

 

 

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22 hours ago, Utah Bob #35998 said:

Maybe they could clone me. That would be awesome! :lol:

I think that word should be "awful".  :P

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23 hours ago, Forty Rod SASS 3935 said:

Contact your local LDS / Mormon church and ask where their local Stake Center is.  They'll usually let you use it for the cost of copying what ever you find and you don't have to join the church to use it.  They generally aren't even aggressive with pushing the word, either.

 

What have you got to lose?

The LDS church has some of the world's best genealogical records, though nor nearly complete, but the best upside is that all it costs is for printing out whatever you want to save.  Down sides are you have to do most of the computer search yourself (using their machines and they will be glad to help if you get stuck) and there is no coffee while you're going through the records. :D

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32 minutes ago, Yellowhouse Sam # 25171 said:

 

Well, not quite.  The markers reside on mitochondrial DNA which is passed down maternally so all children would receive said markers from their mother.  A son couldn't pass that marker on.

 

Thanks for the clarification.  That would make marker loss even more likely.

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On 3/24/2019 at 10:17 AM, Marshal Mo Hare, SASS #45984 said:

Well the British isles got invaded by the Vikings around 700-800 that doesn’t surprise me at all.

There's a TV show on dvd called "The Story of England," where a single village was profiled through all of history.  Turned out that almost all the current inhabitants had Viking ancestry.

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The Vikings had almost taken over until 878.

 

Quote

Alfred had succeeded Æthelred as king of Wessex in 871, and almost faced defeat against the Danish Vikings until his decisive victory at the Battle of Edington in 878. After the battle, the Vikings still ruled Northumbria, East Anglia and eastern Mercia, leaving only Wessex and western Mercia under Anglo-Saxon control.

 

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3 hours ago, Yellowhouse Sam # 25171 said:

Well, not quite.  The markers reside on mitochondrial DNA which is passed down maternally so all children would receive said markers from their mother.  A son couldn't pass that marker on.

 

Response #2 to the comment above:

 

I did a little more reading.  Here is a screenshot of Wikipedia's article on Genealogical DNA testing.  It is true that Mitochondrial DNA carries only matrilineal markers, but the Y-chromosome carries patrilineal markers, and there are also markers on the other (autosomal) chromosomes as well. So I stand by my first post.

 

1430928620_ScreenShot2019-03-25at12_51_57PM.png.4f608eca4b29acc44a9fde015fed16cb.png

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I had a surprise.  Both of my mom's parents were supposed to be from hungary.  When I did the DNA test, they didn't even list that part of europe (I think that would be eastern).  I did have a chunk from western europe though and a lot from england.  I brought it up at christmas one year and my sister didn't miss a beat.  "I told you when you were 5 that you were adopted, why won't you believe me?"

 

But since them mom has done the test and she does indeed show up in my geneaolgy.  I should also note that they've updated the profile 2 or 3 times since then and I think I know show some eastern european genealogy. 

 

It would be fun to find a kid that way.  Who knows how many I've had slip past the goalie? 

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3 hours ago, J-BAR #18287 said:

 

Response #2 to the comment above:

 

I don't know the extent or precision of the general DNA tests conducted with my family except that it was apparent mt-DNA was one of the markers.  Have no idea if any others were utilized.  With the use of the other markers you are correct although  by using multiple markers the probability of one or especially  multiple family members going undetected is more remote.   Geez, all this stuff is roaring back after all these years of not using it (minor in Genetics)....oh well.   

 

3 hours ago, J-BAR #18287 said:

 

I did a little more reading.  Here is a screenshot of Wikipedia's article on Genealogical DNA testing.  It is true that Mitochondrial DNA carries only matrilineal markers, but the Y-chromosome carries patrilineal markers, and there are also markers on the other (autosomal) chromosomes as well. So I stand by my first post.

 

3 hours ago, J-BAR #18287 said:

 

1430928620_ScreenShot2019-03-25at12_51_57PM.png.4f608eca4b29acc44a9fde015fed16cb.png

 

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Negative. I am a meat popsicle.

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I'm not sending my DNA in to anybody.  I'm afraid it will come back that I'm related to Elizabeth Warren.

 

Grandma, is that you??

 

DNA.PNG

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On ‎3‎/‎24‎/‎2019 at 8:58 AM, Capt. James H. Callahan said:

I just got around to checking my results from an Ancestry.com DNA test, mostly no surprise.......53% English/Welsh/NW European, 38% Irish/Scot.......and 9% Norwegian! That doesn't sound too strange, but genetically 9% is a strong hit, like about a great grandparent. Problem is there are no known Norwegians in my ancestry! No one on either side of my family has any idea where that came from. I guess one of my grandparents somewhere about 3 generations ago had some extracurricular activity! :lol:

Sus amigo,

JHC

Being of Norwegian distraction, it ain't so bad.  I have lineage tracing some of my great, greats going back to 1400, 1200 AD.  I know for certain that all of my grandparents came from Norway.  My son did a 23 and Me test and it came back as having some infinitesimal amount of north African in him.  My wife attributes this to long ago travelers but I said it is from her side of the family.   Her side is a dukes mixture of Norwegian, English, German and others unknown.

Who knows, we could be related! 

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My DNA Test Shows my Ancestors was Adam and Eve ! :D

Just sayin.

Rooster 

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On 3/24/2019 at 5:15 PM, Texas jack Black SASS#9362 said:

 I cut myself on a piece off glass yesterday and my blood was green ,SO, I determined I must be IRISH , VULCAN or Both.:D :FlagAm:

Octopus.  No, wait, octopus blood is blue.

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My big surprise was Uncle Kwan, from Asia. Maybe that was the Native American part

my grandfather told me about. Then there was also the Viking...….

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I got my results:

 

No American Indian blood, which is what I truly expected. It's pretty bad when your family is full of sh...stuff.

Here is my result:

Inline image

The Irish is from my Dad's side.

I am sure the Germanic Europe count is from my Mom who said her father's family hailed from Denmark.

According to my Dad he was all Irish with Cherokee Indian. I guess not.

 

I went ahead and paid for the Ancestry subscription so I can trace my family tree back. My Dad was adopted so this might be interesting. I do know a couple of member of his blood family so I should be able to trace my Paternal side back at least a couple of generations. My Mom's side will be difficult as well.

 

Now I can play Cowboys and Indians with no guilt. Yeehaw!

 

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DNA results were pretty much what I had expected - some surprises.  Dad was Finn - Mom said she was French/Cherokee/German.  Well, 67% Finn, 8% Swede (Grandmother was a Swedish Finn - mostly Finn), 20% German,  The French (we knew was from the south of France) turns out to be Italo-Greco-Iberian - OK where is the Cherokee?  Hmmm - a Jewish marker in my DNA.  Mom cooked near Kosher when Dad was gone.  (Do you suppose a pin salesman stopped over in the south of France (Occitania) when it was a Roman colony?)   Another family "secret" is no longer a secret.  I guess my Native American ancestor was named Moshe Goldberg. LoL

 

STL Suomi

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If you study the early history of the United States it is easy to see why genetic testing for Native American ancestry is full of more pitfalls than a game of minesweeper. 

 

Before 1830 Native Americans lived, owned property and intermaried all over the Southeastern US. The Indian Removal Act of 1830 forced many mixed blood Native Americans to either be forced off their land and loose everything or vehemently any Native American herritage. 

Through out history Native Americans and non-Native Americas all over the US have intermingled and brought mixed blood offspring into this world. Some did so willingly and others unwillingly. So what baseline do you use as a reference as Native American?

Just my opinion but the same is true for the rest of the world as well.  Using gentics to trace ancestry is built on a very shaky foundation.  The Romans occupied a significant portion of the world at one time and moved captured slaves all over their empire. Ethnic peoples were either made slaves or citizens. Either way their genetic material was passed both ways as they migrated throughout the Roman Empire. The Vikings raided large parts of costal Europe spreading their genetic material as they did so. It is highly that when the Spanish invaded Central and South America that they left a lot of their genitic material behind. Men and Women all over the world have had affairs outside of their marriage and raised the offspring of those encounters as their own.

As different ethnic peoples attempted to immigrate to this country, sometimes it was in their best interest to claim a more favorable herritage as a means to get ahead in the "New World". As recently as WWII people of German ancestry covered it up so that their loyality to the US wouldn't be questioned.

 

IMNSHO the best a genetic test can do is generally show who you MAY be distantly related to. It cannot disprove a particular lineage. Thinking that your family history is a lie based on this genetic test is doing a great dis-service to your ancestors. In my own family history orphan children were taken in by neighbors and raised as their own rather than be left to starve. Didn't matter if the kid was Swedish, German, Irish or any other ethnic group. Genetically the child is of no relation but in every other way they are family. 

Many escaped slaves were taken in by Native American tribes and became full members of the tribe. After 2 or three generations as living as a members of a tribe how is their offspring's lineage described?

 

Ethnicity is about the culture you grow up in not your genitic material.  Your family is comprised of the people that raised and loved you not the people that donated their genetic material.

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Don't really care who I'm descended from, other than historical interest, or health concerns. I am who I am.

It kinda cracks me up how some people crow about their lineage like they had something to do with it. I had to listen to an old DAR lady go on and on one day.

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If you'd like to find out your family history but can't afford it, just run for public office.

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11 hours ago, Utah Bob #35998 said:

Don't really care who I'm descended from, other than historical interest, or health concerns. I am who I am.

It kinda cracks me up how some people crow about their lineage like they had something to do with it. I had to listen to an old DAR lady go on and on one day.

 

I only 'crow' about mine as to honor (and be proud) of some of the folks I'm related to...on the other side, there are a couple folks that I ain't so proud to be related to. Thankfully the former situation is better than the latter :D 

 

GG ~ :FlagAm:

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Well, I want to know because I am curious. 

All my life I kept hearing about my American Indian roots and my strong ties to Ireland from various family members. Then when I was 13 I find out my Dad was adopted and I get to meet his blood family and they have all this same affliction for espousing what a fine and noble lineage “we” come from.

On my Mom’s side it was less about pride and more about facts. Incorrect facts, like being part Iriquois and having a lot of “Dutch” history :rolleyes:.

 

Looks like both sides of my family were a little off.

 

 

 

 

 

Also, right now there are government minions going over my DNA to find out if I am prone to run with the “tinfoil hat crowd”. They are also checking to see if I might be prone to go off my rocker but what they have found is I am just a little nutty and prone to hanging out with a group of people like you nut jobs! :rolleyes::lol:

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There was a nice young couple from Arkansas. They sent in dna samples and were shocked when the results showed that they were not related .  They decided that it would be their “family secret.”

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Q: What happens when blondes move from New York to New Hampshire?

 

A: Both states become smarter! :P
 

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On 3/25/2019 at 8:06 PM, Finagler 6853 Life said:

Being of Norwegian distraction, it ain't so bad.  I have lineage tracing some of my great, greats going back to 1400, 1200 AD.  I know for certain that all of my grandparents came from Norway.  My son did a 23 and Me test and it came back as having some infinitesimal amount of north African in him.  My wife attributes this to long ago travelers but I said it is from her side of the family.   Her side is a dukes mixture of Norwegian, English, German and others unknown.

Who knows, we could be related! 

Not saying it's bad, but no one on either side of the family seems to know how the H*ll it got there!

JHC:P

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