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Wrangler Red SASS #28281

Cleaning/restoring dried out leather

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I have been shooting a long while. Purchased quality leather when I started. However over the years it has become dried out, and looks it. What is the best way to get some moisture and color back into it without making it stiff or shrinking it?

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I would start with a few light coats of olive oil till you get the desired amount of suppleness 

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Red,

Lexol leather cleaner and conditioner or Neatsfoot Oil.Use these types of conditioners sparingly. They can soften unlined holsters to the point  that they won't hold their shape. 

Choctaw Jack 

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If Neatsfood oil, make sure it actually real Neatsfoot oil and not some blend of other stuff.  And try it sparingly on a small spot to see it it works and if it is truly needed.

 

I've used the same rig for well over 10 years and have not needed to do anything but wipe it down with a clean cloth once in a while.

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Lexol(R) leather conditioner.  But DO NOT OVERDO IT! I would either spray a light application to the leather and wipe off any excess with a soft cloth (I use old T-shirts). Then let dry.  If the leather is so dried out that it is cracking, you are not going to restore it.  Too much of any of these will result in the leather falling apart.

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I like extra virgin olive oil, but I have used lexol and neatsfoot also with good results.

 

There are as many ways to oil leather as there are to make black powder lube and everyone has their own idea about what works best.

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In a past life I spent eighteen years selling leather, seven of them retail and the balance working for a domestic manufacturer of roadrace gear and leather motorcycle jackets. I’ve sold many millions of dollars in leather jackets and in fact I had a million dollar day writing orders in NYC in the glory days before 9/11. Trailrider is right, if that leather is dried out and cracked you’ll never bring it back. The purpose of any leather conditioner is to keep the leather fed. If you do this it can remain supple indefinitely. Once it dries out and the fibers start to break and break down it just ends up limp. The key to keeping leather healthy is to feed it lightly and consistently, though not necessarily frequently, before it needs it. The particular product is less important than the consistency of application and a light touch. I would absolutely not recommend olive oil as it is a food product and will eventually turn rancid; if you’ve ever used any to season a cast iron pan and pulled it out to use a year later then you know the smell I’m talking about. Any of the leather conditioning products listed above are perfectly suitable in moderation. There are no shortcuts in preventative maintenance. Stay ahead of it, boys.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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X2 on no olive oil :excl:

The OP lives in the Mojave(as do I), and heat and dryness is a real issue.

If the leather is cracked etc-The damage is done, and can't be fix'd.

OLG

 

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I have made plenty of saddles and other leather goods and all I have used for the last 25 years in my horse tack and leather goods is virgin olive oil.  I make 1 to 2 saddles a year they all still look great even after 25 years the guy who taught me had been using olive oil on his saddles for many years before I started using it. My life experience is olive oil works great. 

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+3 for a little Lexol.

 

I'm a holster maker and I know some other leather makers who love EVO (extra virgin olive oil).  Personally, I'm not a big fan.  When I make a new rig, I do a light coating of Fiebing's 100% neatsfoot oil.  I also do a finish coat with Fiebing's   carnauba wax and in 16 years of doing cowboy leather, I have never had anyone using my gun leather need any other moisturizer down the road.

 

I'm not saying someone is wrong for using EVO, but it is not something I would use instead of other products.

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Have been watching the answers, thanks all. 
Well, my wife put the kibosh on the olive oil. Thinks it will stink when summer arrives.
Am going to go both of the other ways.  Am going to use Neatsfoot oil on my gun belt and holsters and try 
the Lexol on the Shotgun shell belt. As noted by OLG above I do live in the desert and anything dries up over time. 
Fiteen per cent humidity is great for keeping your guns from rusting in the safe, but everything else dries out.
Caught this before anything cracked. Will keep a close eye on it.
Again thanks for your answers.

WR
 

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Use the Neatsfoot oil on all of it. ;)

The Lexol made today-Is not what it once was...........-_-

 

OLG

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