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Dantankerous

Arming teachers

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Thank God some of my teachers didn't have guns.

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I taught a year in Utah when I got out of the Army (1969-1970) and for several years in southern California.  I was ALWAYS armed and no one ever knew.

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Miss. Sweeny didn't need a gun - she kept the ruler manufacturers in business (when she wasn't playing Gene Krupa on my hands, she was seeing if she could lift me off the floor by the short hairs on the back of my head.)  My hands still hurt thinking about her and I found that a shaved head prevented me from having to walk on my tip toes to the hallway. :-)  I hope Lucifer treats her well.

 

STL Suomi

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10 hours ago, Whiskey Business said:

Nuns were always armed with rulers. Silent but deadly.

Ny wife has stories that make me thankful I was a boy and not a girl in an all girls Catholic school!  Nuns were very inventive when it came to punishment.

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On 2/9/2019 at 7:34 PM, Michigan Slim said:

Thank God some of my teachers didn't have guns.

I had a principal and a teacher that brought guns IN the school.  Those were the days.

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I carried a gun when I was in high school 11th and 12th grades. Ok they were drill rifles with no firing pin or extractors but they were guns. M1 in the 11th grade and M14 in 12th.

 

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I had a Rifle rack in my PU in High School.

                                                                                Largo

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9 hours ago, Dustin Checotah said:

I carried a gun when I was in high school 11th and 12th grades. Ok they were drill rifles with no firing pin or extractors but they were guns. M1 in the 11th grade and M14 in 12th.

 

Our high school Army ROTC had live M-1 rifles, M-1 carbines, 1911 pistols, a BAR, two rocket launchers, a pair of mortars, some .22 rifles and pistols, and a few model 12 shotguns.  All were fully functional.  The rifles and carbines each had a bayonet and there were a dozen or so sabers, too.

 

We also had an indoor small bore range and a full size swimming pool .  BTW, our junior high had an indoor pool, as well.

 

The pools had to be indoors in northern Utah or we'd have had some of the world's biggest Popsicles.

Edited by Forty Rod SASS 3935
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Back in the 7th grade I brought in two hand guns my dad gave me for show and tell. Teacher and everyone loved it and was asked to give the talk to the 8th grade kids. What a shame for what the communist democrats have done too this country and we let them.

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When I was in high school back in the 1980s the woodshop teacher let me make a stock for my 10/22 out of a solid piece of black walnut. I brought the barreled action (minus the bolt) into the class when it came time to do the inletting. I continue to tell that story to people who flat out can't believe something like that was permissible back then.

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8 hours ago, largo casey #19191 said:

I had a Rifle rack in my PU in High School.

                                                                                Largo

I had at least one long gun in mine at school.

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3 hours ago, Sixgun Sheridan said:

When I was in high school back in the 1980s the woodshop teacher let me make a stock for my 10/22 out of a solid piece of black walnut. I brought the barreled action (minus the bolt) into the class when it came time to do the inletting. I continue to tell that story to people who flat out can't believe something like that was permissible back then.

I broke the stock on my hunting rifle when I was a senior in high school in 1973 and my woodshop teacher told me to bring the rifle in and we’d try to fix it. The next day I carried it into school, locked it in my locker and when it came time for shop class I got it out and took it to class. He did an excellent job repairing the stock. When it was finished I carried it out of school at the end of the day slung over my shoulder. No one cared.

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13 hours ago, Forty Rod SASS 3935 said:

Our high school Army ROTC had live M-1 rifles, M-1 carbines, 1911 pistols, a BAR, two rocket launchers, a pair of mortars, some .22 rifles and pistols, and a few model 12 shotguns.  All were fully functional.  The rifles and carbines each had a bayonet and there were a dozen or so sabers, too.

 

We also had an indoor small bore range and a full size swimming pool .  BTW, our junior high had an indoor pool, as well.

 

The pools had to be indoors in northern Utah or we'd have had some of the world's biggest Popsicles.

Our ROTC armory had some 1911A1s and some M16s that we used to field strip but I don't know (remember) if they had the firing pins in those. We had an indoor range and an outdoor range  but the only thing we shot was .22s. I believe they were Remington 40XB-BR. 

Our school had an indoor pool and I was a paid lifeguard there one year.

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I worked in a children's home for six months. I worked 4 days on and 4 days off. I was always armed and there was a S&W Model 625 in .45 ACP in my bag, locked in my room.

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16 hours ago, Sedalia Dave said:

I had at least one long gun in mine at school.

Most (?) of the guys in my school had a gun rack or a gun in the trunk.  Wasn't unusual to get out of school at 3:30 and be up in the foothills by 4:00 hunting upland birds, or in a couple of cases, mule deer.

 

ROTC did flag ceremonies every Monday a.m. and a half dozen local cops and fire fighters would attend.  We were at all sports event and had a championship close order drill team, complete with Garands and bayonets.  Had some cadets in every parade until the late 70s.

 

Last time I had a gun on campus (that anyone knew about) was in 1983 at Santiago HS in Santa Ana, CA.  I took some of my guns to a history class every quarter from 1976 until 1983 and gave a class on western history.  When the teacher died that all stopped and now if you even say the word "gun" on a campus you'll be rudely introduced to a SWAT team.

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9 hours ago, Dustin Checotah said:

Our ROTC armory had some 1911A1s and some M16s that we used to field strip but I don't know (remember) if they had the firing pins in those. We had an indoor range and an outdoor range  but the only thing we shot was .22s. I believe they were Remington 40XB-BR. 

Our school had an indoor pool and I was a paid lifeguard there one year.

I'd have given my teeth for a Remington.  We had Colt Woodsman target models and a few Ruger Standards.  There was one .22 revolver but I have no idea what make or model it was.  Master Sergeant Charlie Woolums, one of our instructors, used it more than anyone else.

 

To this day I have never fired anything based on the AR15-M16 chassis.  Saw them in 'Nam in 1968, and a sweet little piece called an XM117 (?) all sawed off and compact.  The week before I left the Corps we turned in our M14s and were issued M16s.  As Supply Sergeant I was in charge of getting them received, stored, and assigned, but I left before we started firing them.

Edited by Forty Rod SASS 3935

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1 hour ago, Forty Rod SASS 3935 said:

Saw them in 'Nam in 1968, and a sweet little piece called an XM117 (?) all sawed off and compact.

 

  M117 AKA CAR-16.  Carbine version of the M-16.

 

Quote

 

The first carbine version of the M16 assault rifle appeared under the name of CAR-15 in 1965, an was intended for US Special Forces who fought in Vietnam.

 

The original M16 was simply shortened by cutting the half of the lenght of the barrel (from original 20 inches to 10 inches) and by shortening the buttstock by another 3 inches. The butt was plastic and retractable, the handguards were of triangular shape and the flash hider was of original three-prong type. Based on the origunal CAR-15, Colt quickly developed the CAR-15 Air Force Survival Rifle, intended, as a name implied, to serve to downed airplane and helicopter pilots. This version had tubular handguards and metallick tubular buttstock, and fo some reasons the pistol grip was shortened.

 

Initial combat experience with CAR-15 brought up some problems. First, the carbine was too loud, deafing the firing soldier quite quickly. Second, the muzzle flash was also terrific, blinding the shooter at night and giving avay the position of the shooter to the enemies. Colt partially solved this problem by installing a new, longer flash suppressor. This version, known as the Colt model 609 Commando, also carried new handguards of tubular shape. This model was officially adopted by US ARmy as XM-177E1. This wersion had M16A1-style receiver with forward assist button. In the mid-1967 Colt slightly upgraded the Commando by lenghting the barrel up to 11.5 inches (292 mm), and this version was adopted as XM-177E2.

 

Later, with the introduction of the M16A2 and M16A3 (flat-top) models, Colt also changed the design of itys Commando line, adding three-burst options and flat-top receivers with Weaver-style rails.

 

Current Colt Commando carbines (Colt still called these Submachine-guns) are based on either M16A2 or M16A3 receivers, and had 11.5 inch (292 mm) barrels with M16A2-style flash suppressors, and available in either 3-round bursts or full-auto versions. Colt Commando carbines are used by various US Special Forces and by some foreign forces, including Israei ISAYERET.

 

From the technical point of view, the Colt Commando is similar to contemporary M16 rifle, having same light alloy, two parts receiver, direct gas operated, rotating bolt action, with non-reciprocating charging handle at the rear of the receiver. The telescoping buttstock is made from metallic tube. Due to recoil spring, located inside the butt, the Commando cannot be equipped with side- or underfolding stock withouth some redesigning. Currenly Colt Commando assault carbines are issued with standard M16-type 30 round magazines, but any other M16-compatible magazine can be used, including the 100-rounds Beta-C dual drums.

 

 

Edited by Sedalia Dave

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On ‎2‎/‎9‎/‎2019 at 7:28 PM, Whiskey Business said:

Nuns were always armed with rulers. Silent but deadly.

How well I know. But please  don't ask for details. 

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On ‎2‎/‎10‎/‎2019 at 9:25 PM, Dustin Checotah said:

I carried a gun when I was in high school 11th and 12th grades. Ok they were drill rifles with no firing pin or extractors but they were guns. M1 in the 11th grade and M14 in 12th.

 

You are talking about another time and place. 

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9 hours ago, Badger Mountain Charlie SASS #43172 said:

You are talking about another time and place. 

ROTC at the local high school has an indoor range but I think the only thing shoot is pellet guns.

When I was in junior high one students father brought in a custom sporterized Mauser that he had done and showed it to the class. That was about 67 or 68.

 

 

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14 hours ago, Forty Rod SASS 3935 said:

I'd have given my teeth for a Remington.  We had Colt Woodsman target models and a few Ruger Standards.  There was one .22 revolver but I have no idea what make or model it was.  Master Sergeant Charlie Woolums, one of our instructors, used it more than anyone else.

 

To this day I have never fired anything based on the AR15-M16 chassis.  Saw them in 'Nam in 1968, and a sweet little piece called an XM117 (?) all sawed off and compact.  The week before I left the Corps we turned in our M14s and were issued M16s.  As Supply Sergeant I was in charge of getting them received, stored, and assigned, but I left before we started firing them.

The AR-15 platform is fun to shoot. I have 6 now but my first affliction is the .30 cal. U.S. made types. I also have a fondness for foreign military types too but don't have a pic of those.

IMG_0773.JPG

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2 minutes ago, Dustin Checotah said:

The AR-15 platform is fun to shoot. I have 6 now but my first affliction is the .30 cal. U.S. made types. I also have a fondness for foreign military types too but don't have a pic of those.

IMG_0773.JPG

 

Dayaam! Can I be your friend? Nice collection!

 

:D

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1 minute ago, Dantankerous said:

 

Dayaam! Can I be your friend? Nice collection!

 

:D

I thought we were all friends here in the saloon.

That is just a minor collection compared to some I have seen around here.

That 1898 Krag at the top came in at about $40 back when I was 15 or 16. I'm 65 now.

I paid about the same for the bayonet on the M1 as I did for the Krag. That was just last year.

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16 hours ago, Dustin Checotah said:

The AR-15 platform is fun to shoot. I have 6 now but my first affliction is the .30 cal. U.S. made types. I also have a fondness for foreign military types too but don't have a pic of those.

IMG_0773.JPG

Beautiful Collection, sir. 

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