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     Still working on finding the right ammo to shoot in my Henry Big Boy (HBB)**.

     I have been experimenting with various manufacturers and testing both 38 spl and .357 ammo.

    As mentioned in the post by Half Deaf Hoss Deveraux regarding Georgia Arms ammo, I do not reload as yet; however, I have been collecting my brass from all my shoots with the anticipation that with more time, I will reload my own ammo. (NOTE: I fully intend to find a mentor to work with before I go out on my own!)

    My questions for now are these:

1. If .357 ammo shoots better in my HBB, should I simplify and shoot .357 in my NM Ruger Vaqueros as well, or reload the cheaper 38 spl?

2. When buying factory ammo for now, same question as above - buy 357 for both or 357 for HBB and 38 for Rugers?

3. When buying factory ammo I have been focused on 158 grain rounds, yet I see in the Georgia Arms thread discussions of 125 grain rounds. What are the advantages/disadvantages of shooting either in both my HBB and NM Rugers?

 

     I'm sure there are a lot of new shooters out there that might have the same questions, and even if they don't, they may not have considered them.

     Thanking everyone in advance for their insight on this as I truly value your expertise in this matter.

 

**(Peanut gallery responses to shooting a HBB not required  ;))

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With the lighter bullet you should experience less felt recoil. With less felt recoil, usually, not always, comes faster shooting. In my opinion I would only shoot 357's in the rifle if that worked better in it but still use 38's in the pistol for the less felt recoil, all based on the fps the rounds are loaded. Felt recoil is not as important in rifle but can make a big difference in pistol. If rifle functions fine with 38's then skip 357's all together so you only have one caliber to load when you finally go that route. Of course, if 357's work better in the rifle than you have the option to use all 357's back to the only having one type round to load when you start loading. This is just my opinion and opinions are like butt cracks, everybody has one.

 

MBSW

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46 minutes ago, Father Kit Cool Gun Garth said:

3. When buying factory ammo I have been focused on 158 grain rounds, yet I see in the Georgia Arms thread discussions of 125 grain rounds.

The 125 grain loads will have less recoil and are preferred for your handguns.  However, they will probably shoot lower in your revolvers than the 158 grain rounds.  Are you prepared to file you sights to get a them to shoot POA with a different load?

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Papa Cold Iron (a little irony, pun intended... :D)

 

In your #1 sentence, you ask:  "IF .357 ammo shoots better.......".    Are you stating that

it does shoot better or are you just presenting a particular  'what if' scenario?

 

And IF the .357 shoots better, is it better because of reliable functioning or accuracy?

 

If the .357 functions MUCH more reliable than .38 stuff, you would naturally want to use the

.357 in your rifle.   BUT, its highly possible that the OAL is the reason.  If thats the situation,

why not try to get you some .38 fodder with an OAL similar to the .357 OAL.

 

Then you will only have to deal with one cartridge for both the pistols and rifle.

 

Feel free to call and small talk if ya want.

 

 

..........Widder

865 / 696-1996

 

 

 

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If .357 works in the rifle them by all means shoot it in the pistols. It is contradictory to the KISS principle that many here espouse to load a different caliber for each with such a small performance difference between them. And if you are competing with an HBB you are not a race gunner anyway. The difference in performance between .38 and .357 will manifest itself only with those who are shooting at the top of their game. As for 125gr pills I agree with everything that’s already been said.

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Just what do you mean by "If .357 ammo shoots better in my HBB"?

If it cycles better in the HBB, then load .357 cases for rifle and handguns.

It's KISS, at it's core...

You can load SASS level .38 loads in .357 mag brass without issue.

I wouldn't go much lighter than a 120gn bullet........I load 158's for my wife:wub:.

OLG

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Your Questions have been adequately covered ......... however I just wanted to pile on  :o   It is basically simple, if 357 cartridges cycle thru your Big Boy better than 38 cartridges, by ALL means plan on running357 cases when you reload.

 

There is no really good reason not to run 357 cases in your Rugers if you are reloading.  When reloading, there is no difference in cost between 38 and 357 cases.  You'll already own the 357 cases.  Buying factory ammo though, 38 for the Rugers will be cheaper.

 

Reloading ... the 125Gr bullet will win hands down.  A.)  It's cheaper to buy/cast.   B.)  Less felt recoil.  Actually, lots less.  You will have to scrape out the carbon ring in your Ruger chambers to run 357 cases.  I also strongly suggest you have your cylinder throats checked for diameter to match your barrel.  Ruger is famous for undersize Throats.  Undersize throats don't do good things for accuracy and contribute to felt recoil.

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27 minutes ago, Colorado Coffinmaker said:

Previous text removed only to 5aabc8dbbea2b_SavethePlanet-RESIZED.jpg.549db22b774197dd20ef4ab9dc431a63.jpg.

Ruger is famous for undersize Throats.  Undersize throats don't do good things for accuracy and contribute to felt recoil.

 

CC,

   I finally have a written reason for missing those tegets now.! :P

   

 

 

 

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13 minutes ago, Father Kit Cool Gun Garth said:

 

CC,

   I finally have a written reason for missing those tegets now.! :P

   

 

 

 

I'll jump on that wagon too Garth.

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I am in the camp where shooting two different calibers between rifle and sixguns is no big deal, just pay attention at the loading table.  I do it almost every time out.

 

When you start reloading, if you use a turret press, you just have two turrets set up with the correct dies so caliber change is quick and easy without having to adjust anything.  Use a powder like Trail Boss or Unique that is not position sensitive and life is good.

 

The 125's are a nice balance between the 158's and 105's a lot of folks are using.  

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I'd probably buy something that would feed 38's :P

 

**(Peanut gallery responses to shooting a HBB not required  ;))

You didn't really expect us to honor that did you?

 

 

 

Seriously, when you start reloading you can load 38's to a length that will feed through your rifle.

 

Whatever you decide get out there and shoot straight!

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4 minutes ago, Tyrel Cody said:

I'd probably buy something that would feed 38's :P

You didn't really expect us to honor that did you?

Seriously, when you start reloading you can load 38's to a length that will feed through your rifle.

Whatever you decide get out there and shoot straight!

 

Tyrel:

    Since you first brought it up, what do you mean by " to a length"?

    Keep in mind I know nothing at the moment about reloading. :blush:

    Maybe I need a lesson in reloading to better understand the nuances of bullet calibers, cartridge lengths and OAL.

    Can a 38 bullet be loaded on a 357 cartridge? :blink:

    As with others, I'm sure reloading is a whole new ballgame.

    Appreciate the input so far - much to learn.

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When you reload, you can set the bullet seating depth for your application, ie set the OAL the same as a.357.  

 

Yes, the 38 and .357 share the same bullet choices.

Edited by Jailhouse Jim, SASS #13104
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11 minutes ago, Father Kit Cool Gun Garth said:

 

Tyrel:

    Since you first brought it up, what do you mean by " to a length"?

    Keep in mind I know nothing at the moment about reloading. :blush:

    Maybe I need a lesson in reloading to better understand the nuances of bullet calibers, cartridge lengths and OAL.

    Can a 38 bullet be loaded on a 357 cartridge? :blink:

    As with others, I'm sure reloading is a whole new ballgame.

    Appreciate the input so far - much to learn.

 

JJ mostly it.

 

.357 and .38 use the same bullets.

 

.357 cartridges are around 1.58 in overall length. You can usually load .38 cartridges at or near that OAL with a 125 grain bullet crimped outside the crimp groove of the bullet.

 

I'll try and take some pictures when I get time as it's a lot easier to understand.

 

Buy yourself a reloading manual, such as the Lyman 50th.

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For fun go to Harbor Freight or Amazon and buy yourself a cheap digital caliper and measure some of the commercial ammo you’ve already got. You’re gonna need it anyway when you start reloading.

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14 minutes ago, Lead Friend, SASS #53635 said:

For fun go to Harbor Freight or Amazon and buy yourself a cheap digital caliper and measure some of the commercial ammo you’ve already got. You’re gonna need it anyway when you start reloading.

 

Lead Friend:

    If I'm going to purchase a digital caliper (which I had already researched) I would prefer to get the best on the market for reloading, instead of having to purchase another one later.

    Here is the one I was considering.

    VINCA DCLA-0605 Quality Electronic Digital Vernier Caliper

     Cost is about $17.15.

     378951737_VINCADCLA-0605QualityElectronicDigitalVernierCaliper.JPG.f8f61e8375155cacccec5f2585dd298e.JPG

    Should I consider something better?

 

Edited by Father Kit Cool Gun Garth
Delete second pic

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18 dollar calipers... Ain't close to the best.

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You’re not building rockets, you’re just building missiles. Consistency is more important than absolute accuracy in measuring for reloading. You only need to be able to repeat the same measurement reliably so you can create the same result every time. Having said that buy the best that you can reasonably afford.

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8 minutes ago, Phantom, SASS #54973 said:

18 dollar calipers... Ain't close to the best.

Mind letting us know what is the best?

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I use the old analog mechanical calipers, no batteries, no problems. Once you're set up you can always make a "go, no go template". 

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To avoid side-tracking this post about ammo questions, I started another thread on Calipers.

Thanks.

 

 

11 minutes ago, Phantom, SASS #54973 said:

18 dollar calipers... Ain't close to the best.

 

4 minutes ago, Lead Friend, SASS #53635 said:

You’re not building rockets, you’re just building missiles. Consistency is more important than absolute accuracy in measuring for reloading. You only need to be able to repeat the same measurement reliably so you can create the same result every time. Having said that buy the best that you can reasonably afford.

 

2 minutes ago, Tyrel Cody said:

Mind letting us know what is the best?

 

1 minute ago, Assassin said:

I use the old analog mechanical calipers, no batteries, no problems. Once you're set up you can always make a "go, no go template". 

 

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1 hour ago, Tyrel Cody said:

Mind letting us know what is the best?

I can't tell us what the best is... Too subjective.

 

I prefer Mitutoyo.

 

Cheers!

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Starrett used to be the go to brand.

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2 hours ago, Jailhouse Jim, SASS #13104 said:

I am in the camp where shooting two different calibers between rifle and sixguns is no big deal, just pay attention at the loading table.  I do it almost every time out.

 

When you start reloading, if you use a turret press, you just have two turrets set up with the correct dies so caliber change is quick and easy without having to adjust anything.  Use a powder like Trail Boss or Unique that is not position sensitive and life is good.

 

The 125's are a nice balance between the 158's and 105's a lot of folks are using.  

Same caliber-Different case length of about 1/8" is all.

Not worth the hassle, IMHO.  -_-

Sorting the cases out later to reload, will get old, real fast.

YMMV,

OLG

 

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51 minutes ago, Assassin said:

Starrett used to be the go to brand.

I think that Starrett only has one line of USA made dial 6" calipers now.:(

Been using my set for almost 30 yrs.

Mitutoyo is also very good.

OLG

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1 hour ago, Assassin said:

Starrett used to be the go to brand.

Yep - or Brown & Sharpe

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30 minutes ago, The Original Lumpy Gritz said:

 

Not worth the hassle, IMHO.  -_-

Sorting the cases out later to reload, will get old, real fast.

YMMV,

OLG

 

While this can be true if you don't stay on top of it, I sort them out after cleaning after each shoot.  It only takes a minute or two.

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1 minute ago, Jailhouse Jim, SASS #13104 said:

While this can be true if you don't stay on top of it, I sort them out after cleaning after each shoot.  It only takes a minute or two.

JJ-Are you shooting a mix of 38 and 357 then?

OLG

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1 minute ago, The Original Lumpy Gritz said:

JJ-Are you shooting a mix of 38 and 357 then?

OLG

I shoot a mix of 38WCF and 44WCF so it's even a bit more tedious.

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1 minute ago, Jailhouse Jim, SASS #13104 said:

I shoot a mix of 38WCF and 44WCF so it's even a bit more tedious.

SO-Ya like pok'n the Bear then. :lol:

OLG

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13 minutes ago, The Original Lumpy Gritz said:

SO-Ya like pok'n the Bear then. :lol:

OLG

:lol: I guess you could call it that. 

 

When I started, I used all 45 Colt.  Then I found a fixer upper original '73 in 38WCF and I got two hand guns to match.  Then I wanted a '92.  Could only find one in 44WCF.  Then I found a Chaparral '73 in 38WCF and another in 45 Colt.  Then I started shooting '51 Navy Colt replicas in the original .36 caliber.

 

Every month, I go to the safe and say hmmmmmmm.  I might pull out the same caliber or run a mish mash of stuff like a broke down rimrock rider might have in 1870.  I also might switch classes from month to month depending on the mood.

 

I'm not a speed guy, I live the adventure :o.

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This is with Waimea's Outlaw Bullets 125gr. I can't hardly seat .38 as long as .357 with them; 1.51 vas 1.56. But Badman Bullets make a 127 gr bullet with no crimp groove that I can. Hope this gives you a better visual.I would think anything over 1.50 OAL would feed through your HBB.

 

 

IMG_20190120_203536792.thumb.jpg.df36e348a49afa14d7002c526a8746a8.jpgIMG_20190120_203039726.thumb.jpg.afa9f3e4e32d6dbccee0491688c68ec3.jpgIMG_20190120_203110919.thumb.jpg.9b452a92af2f8606ae5d237f811d4fea.jpgIMG_20190120_204827268.thumb.jpg.21ce5788c1712a89501f3ced82aeb01b.jpg

IMG_20190120_204849810.thumb.jpg.443252acba89750750bb9bb161766121.jpgIMG_20190120_205042000.jpg.2ff0ccafe26219b98c6de4b3fec62060.jpg

IMG_20190120_205108346.jpg

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FKKGG Tyrel suggested you buy a Lyman reloading manual.I highly agree, This will give you a technical basis for your future questions when some of us may not know the exact level of you knowledge. Others have offered phone consults, that would also be very useful and rapidly bring you up to speed on the reloading process. I am available if you wish. 615-305-2621

 

Imis

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I'm going to go out on a limb here.  I've been reloading for 35 years, so I am not an authority or anything, but I am also not talking out my backside either.

 

.38 Special and  .357 tend to be some of the easiest cartridges to reload.  The brass tends to be pretty durable when run with moderate or light loads like used in SASS.  By pretty durable, I mean if you don't lose them or step on them, you'll likely use them forever.  Also when you lose 10% of your brass a match, you rarely have any cases that get to 10 reloadings.

 

You are overthinking this.  Get a machine (Dillon Square Deal B is pretty good for beginners and very economical too) get a reloading manual and get to it.  Once fired is fine, starline is great, range brass. . .  too much trouble for the savings.

I pick on you in the Saloon, but here I am serious, somber and sober. . .  well two out of three ain't bad :D

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