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Alpo

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They don't use "roofing felt" under shingles any more. The use some gray plastic stuff.

 

After putting the gray stuff down, does it have to sit in the sun for some time, to fure or something?

 

Saturday, there was a crew across the street. Took off the tarp, took off the shingles, took off the felt.

 

Down to bare wood.

 

Started putting down the gray stuff.

 

Sunday, two guys were there (not the whole crew) finishing the gray stuff. They were through and gone by 9:30. I figger, okay, they're taking Sunday off.

 

It's now 10:45 Monday. There's not a soul on that roof.

 

What the hell?

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I talked to the homeowners. The roofers did not "take Sunday off". They were unable to find any shingles.

 

Lot of roofing going on around here. Can't find any shingles.

 

I fling the BS flag.

 

I suspect that if roofer had told homeowner he had five other customers ahead of him, homeowner would have found a different roofer.

 

By starting the job, and leaving it incomplete and going to ANOTHER job, homeowner is pretty well stuck waiting on roofer to come back.

 

Not saying for sure this is happening, but I've heard it's common in construction.

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Posted (edited)

A common enough ploy to have and keep work.

The most offensive ploy I found was the company I observed, who advertise they perform home restoration following a fire, in the home beside my parents home..

The insurance inspector, the day of the fire, described the home as a write-off to me, when I came over.

 

Then someone decided to try to save what was left. (There were only a couple of holes in the roof, chopped by the Fire Dept, to access the fire in the attic)

 

The work started without a building permit, hence, no building inspector dropping by for those pesky inspections., (And conveniently, no time limit on the job!!)

 

Then, sub trades doing the work as a "fill-in" between other jobs.

This apparently attracted a  lower hourly rate than the restoration company would normally pay, but also means the sub-trade could drop tools whenever  something paying more comes up.

In this case, which I have personal knowledge of, I observed charred  rafters and wall studs reduced to 3/4 or less than their original size, painted over with sealer, to block the burned wood odor, then 1/2" scanting nailed and shimmed to the burned wood, to make a smooth nailing surface, then covered with gyp-rock.

Electricians, (three different companies) coming in on an irregular basis, sometimes staying around for 1 hour or less, then leaving for other jobs and the portion they were working on, left incomplete.

At times, there was no-one working on the home for a week or more.

The  plumber was pretty good,  but by that point, some 5 months after the fire, I had enough and as a retired city worker knew something was not right. I checked with the city building inspector's office, only to find there was no building permit. 

 

Once a Stop Work order was nailed to the door then a Building Permit obtained, complete with a completion date specified, the work progressed quickly.

 

The homeowner, tired of living in a hotel, with their dog in a kennel, thanked me.

The issue now, (9 years later) is the home owner wants sell, but potential buyer's home inspectors take one look at the "restoration" and that's it.

I was told by by one inspector, that the only way he would move in was if the entire home was done over, removing all the wall and ceiling gyp-rock and the roof joists and wall studs replaced.

Edited by Cold Lake Kid, SASS # 51474

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5 hours ago, Alpo said:

They don't use "roofing felt" under shingles any more. The use some gray plastic stuff.

 

After putting the gray stuff down, does it have to sit in the sun for some time, to fure or something?

 

Saturday, there was a crew across the street. Took off the tarp, took off the shingles, took off the felt.

 

Down to bare wood.

 

Started putting down the gray stuff.

 

Sunday, two guys were there (not the whole crew) finishing the gray stuff. They were through and gone by 9:30. I figger, okay, they're taking Sunday off.

 

It's now 10:45 Monday. There's not a soul on that roof.

 

What the hell?

They are probably using some form of polypropylene underlayment. Around here a common brand is called Titanium. Way tougher than felt paper and easier work with. It is grey in color. It does not have to cure. Put it down and shingle right over it. Not a lot of roofing felt (tar paper) used on roofs around here anymore.

 

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Maybe the roofer told the truth.

 

A flatbed just pulled up outside loaded with shingles.

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15 hours ago, Loophole LaRue, SASS #51438 said:

Ice and water shield?

 

LL

 

Well, that was pretty stupid......

 

Ice and water shield in the Florida panhandle?

 

That will teach me to look at the location of the original poster.

 

Up north, ice has a sneaky way of working up under the shingles, especially when there is an ice dam - a frozen mass of ice over the eaves, usually caused when the eaves are not properly insulated..  Melting water from the higher part of the roof will then back up above the dam, and get up under the shingles - and leak into the attic.  Nasty, and miserable to deal with in the middle of winter.  My neighbors had a crew on their roof last winter with ice chippers, axes and assorted other hand tools, trying to break up ice dams; and then ended up replacing their roof in the Spring.

 

Ice and water shield is a rubbery membrane, self-adhesive, applied over the sheathing in horizontal strips; it forms a nearly impenetrable barrier to water; it self-heals when roofing nails are driven through the shingles. Most folks with asphalt shingles apply it along the edges and in the valleys before shingling;   I have a standing seam steel roof, and the roofers applied ice and water shield over the entire roof before attaching the panels.

 

The things you guys in the South don't have to worry about.  Like shoveling sidewalks, salt on the roads, snow tires, snow loads on roofs, engine block heaters, winter wiper blades on your cars, and ice melt for the driveway.

 

LL

 

 

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It is not really smart to start a roofing job not having materials available to do the job,  looks like it worked out this time. 

Just saying,

Blackfoot

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Loophole- We do have to worry about ice and snow in the south. Seven snowflakes can immobilize a city of 1,000,00 with 400 accidents and not a loaf of bread or gallon of milk for a week. We totally loose our minds and..its Jan 8 with 54 degrees at 7:15 am..so maybe it's not so bad.

 

Imis

  • Haha 1

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