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Marshal Jack Murphy SASS #32018

Question about rebuilding a Marlin 336 and 1895

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Ho

In 2012 my house was involved in a forest fire and consequently my guns where damaged even though they were in a fireproof safe. When I opened the safe all the wood was nothing but ash. I cleaned, refinished and put new springs in my Springfield 1911 and Beretta 92F. They shoot just fine in fact the 1911 shoots better than the brand new Remington 1911. Now I am looking at rebuilding 2 marlins. I have a 1895CB  in 45-70 and a 336 in 30-30. They have been kept inside since the fire and do have small rust spots which seem to cleaned up easily with a little work. I am thinking of having the 336 barrel re-bored to 38-55 or re-finishing  the 1895 leaving it in 45-70. 

 

My questions are:

Are these rifles able to be rebuilt?

Should I keep them in the same calibers? 

Kinda off subject, can you shoot 45-60 ammo in a gun chambered for 45-70?

 

Thanks,

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Until you have the hardness of the metal confirmed. 

I would NOT fire them.

I would not fire .45-60 in a .45-70 chamber........

OLG

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45 minutes ago, Marshal Jack Murphy SASS #32018 said:

Are these rifles able to be rebuilt?

That's a question best answered by someone able to test the metal and make sure it hasn't altered its properties by the heat suffered in the fire.

Quote

Should I keep them in the same calibers? 

Sure, why not?  But, changing shouldn't be a problem either.

Quote

Kinda off subject, can you shoot 45-60 ammo in a gun chambered for 45-70?

Answer for yourself, 45-70:

4570.jpg

 

45-60:

I didn't find a diagram of this cartridge, but... Wiki sez:

Quote

 

The .45-60 Winchester is a centerfire rifle cartridge intended for 19th-century big-game hunting.[4] Nomenclature of the era indicated the .45-60 cartridge contained a 0.45-inch (11 mm) diameter bullet with 60 grains (3.9 g) of black powder. Winchester Repeating Arms Company shortened the .45-70 government cartridge to operate through the Winchester Model 1876 rifle's lever-action.[2] The Colt Lightning Carbine and the Whitney Arms Company's Kennedy lever-action rifle were also chambered for the .45-60.[1] These early rifles' advantage of faster loading for subsequent shots was soon eclipsed by the stronger and smoother Winchester Model 1886 action capable of handling longer cartridges including the popular full length .45-70.[4] The .45-60 and similarly short cartridges designed for the Model 1876 rifle faded into obsolescence as 20th-century hunters preferred more powerful smokeless powder loadings of cartridges designed for stronger rifles. Winchester production of .45-60 cartridges ended during the great depression.[1]

 

Type Rifle
Place of origin United States
Production history
Designed 1879[1]
Manufacturer Winchester Repeating Arms Company[2]
Produced 1879-1935[1]
Specifications
Parent case .45-70[2]
Case type Rimmed, tapered[1]
Bullet diameter 0.458 inches (11.6 mm)[3]
Case length 1.89 inches (4.8 cm)[2]
Ballistic performance
 
 
Bullet mass/type Velocity Energy
300 gr (19 g) Lead 1,390 ft/s (420 m/s)

 

Because both are tapered cases, (only appear straight), have the same base diameter, and the same bullet diameter, the 45-60 has more taper to it's shorter case length, and may not chamber properly for correct bullet alignment.   That's my takeaway from looking at the specs... but, I could be wrong.  

 

SAAMI sez that you should not use the right column in rifles chambered  in the left column.

45-70 Government 454 Casull
                                    475 Linebaugh
                                    480 Ruger  

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