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Black Angus McPherson

Question about gun ports

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I overheard a discussion about an old Spanish fort that was found in Missouri a number of years back.  One party opined that it was reconstructed incorrectly because the gun ports were backwards.  The gun ports are, of course, a "V" shape.  The party in question said the wide part of the "V" should be on the outside of the fort with the narrow end near the shooter.  The fort in question was rebuilt/repaired with the wide part of the "V" on the inside.

 

Now I admit there is a possibility that I'm wrong (it has happened once, maybe twice, before) but I thought it would make more sense for the narrow part to be on the outside of the fort to avoid funneling any incoming rounds to the shooter inside.  Wouldn't the available angle of fire from the fort be the same either way.

 

I wouldn't be at all surprised if they were built both ways, but which is the "correct" method?  I've got a book or two about castles and forts that would probably tell me, but of course I can't find them at the moment.

 

What says the peanut gallery?

 

Angus

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http://www.fortpittblockhouse.com/what-is-a-gun-loop/

 

Gun Loops

This image depicts how the gun loops appear inside the Block House.

They have a wider opening inside to allow for range of motion with a musket.

Photo credit – Fort Pitt Society

 

 

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9 minutes ago, PaleWolf Brunelle, #2495L said:

http://www.fortpittblockhouse.com/what-is-a-gun-loop/

 

Gun Loops

This image depicts how the gun loops appear inside the Block House.

They have a wider opening inside to allow for range of motion with a musket.

Photo credit – Fort Pitt Society

 

 

 

Thanks.

 

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Wide part of the "v" is to the inside.  The result is a much wider field of fire for the defending ports and a much smaller target for the those assaulting.  Whether "Gun" ports or arrow firing slits, if one studies fortifications thru the ages, the design of shooting ports has always had the wide part of the vee to the inside to give maximum field of fire to the defender.

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3 hours ago, Black Angus McPherson said:

I overheard a discussion about an old Spanish fort that was found in Missouri a number of years back.  One party opined that it was reconstructed incorrectly because the gun ports were backwards.  The gun ports are, of course, a "V" shape.  The party in question said the wide part of the "V" should be on the outside of the fort with the narrow end near the shooter.  The fort in question was rebuilt/repaired with the wide part of the "V" on the inside.

 

Now I admit there is a possibility that I'm wrong (it has happened once, maybe twice, before) but I thought it would make more sense for the narrow part to be on the outside of the fort to avoid funneling any incoming rounds to the shooter inside.  Wouldn't the available angle of fire from the fort be the same either way.

 

I wouldn't be at all surprised if they were built both ways, but which is the "correct" method?  I've got a book or two about castles and forts that would probably tell me, but of course I can't find them at the moment.

 

What says the peanut gallery?

 

Angus

The person who thought this was probably thinking the barrels were sticking out thru the slits (and therefore the small V restricted the arc of fire) rather than being level with the inside wall (where the big V allows maximum arc) so the gun is behind as much cover as possible. During siege warfare embrasures would be made with a means of covering the gap while loading. 

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Who wants a funnel to channel the projectiles in towards the defender?

 

ive been in numerous fortifications that dated from medieval to 18th century and the V has always been inside.

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