Jump to content
SASS Wire Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Hoss

Lee vs Dillon

Recommended Posts

Dutch-Bull 

i disagree Dodge and 38 super comp!

Maryann and Ginger YUP:rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

NAH!!  

 

Chevy, 7.62X51, and the Rockettes!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/11/2018 at 10:31 AM, Shooting Bull said:

 

 It's my firm opinion a person should load a few thousand rounds on a single stage in order to learn the overall reloading process before moving on to a progressive press.

If you don't start on a single stage press, how are you ever going to fully appreciate a Dillon progressive press?  I don't know about the few thousand rounds part.  I think you can get the full effect after about 500 rounds, which equates to 2,000 pulls of the press handle, 500 of the powder throw handle and about 6 hours.   For producing lots of ammo, I love my Dillons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Dutch Nichols, SASS #6461 said:

Bull

I agree Ford and 45 acp, but why limit yourself ?

why not....... Ginger AND Mary Ann ?:wub:

 

Totally agree, just didn't want to seem greedy. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/11/2018 at 1:28 AM, Jailhouse Jim, SASS #13104 said:

I started reloading in 1968 with the original Lee Loader do to being a broke college kid.  I received a RCBS Rock Chucker for Christmas that I used for several years after that. 

 

Needing more production, I tried a Lee Classic Turret Press and liked it.   Still being at a low income level, the Lee was affordable so I bought one.  At 200 rds an hour, I was able to make sufficient ammo for my needs.  Lee came out with the Pro 1000 which was an ok progressive as long as you kept it adjusted but definitely not great.  I kept using the original turret for close to thirty years before upgrading to the all steel model to do heavy rifle rds.  I gave my old press to a beginner reloader and it's still going strong.

 

About ten years ago after I had the income to purchase one, I drank of the blue koolaid based on all the blue hype and bought a 650 for 45 Colt.  It produced ammo fast, really fast.  I'm happy right?  I was until I went to 9mm.  My Dillon hates 9mm.  It also eats 38-40/44-40 brass intermittently, something I never experienced on the Lee.  It seems I am always on hyper alert to catch problems with the little cases.  The frustration level increased to the point I covered the Dillon and went back to the Lee.

 

Just recently I decided to give BIG BLUE another try to figure out why I am have all these nit picky problems or to send it on to another reloader.  The WCF issues appear to be all brass related.  Some, not all, Starline cases have a thicker head that will not go into the shell plate.  I am still investigating the small case issues and have not found that answer yet.

 

Does Dillon make a good product?  Yes. 

Are there other suitable products currently available for those on a more limited budget or skill level?  Absolutely.

AreDillon's for everyone?  No.

 

To say Dillon is the only reloader to consider is somewhat narrow minded in my opinion.  Skill level, ability, budget, space consideration, volume requirements, etc. should all be considered before offering advice to a novice. 

 

For example, a new guy says he is on a  really short budget and wants to start loading.  Do you just tell him to buy the Dillon and cry once or do you offer any alternatives to give him a choice to fit his needs instead of yours?

YOU ARE RIGHT

Started reloading in 1960 with a Lyman 310 tool for 38spl. & 357 mag I then step up to Lee Truline jr I reloaded fr all rifles an handguns with it I was stating to build quite a collection ,Then I bought an RCBS JR. An then a RCBS ROCKCHUCKER AN Then in the late 70's DILLION making waves ,I bought an 450 , Later on I converted to a 550 for $50. I bought Numerous Coversion kits an a CASE FEEDER This was done over decades. If you are into guns an don't have a lot of money you have to start Small an work your way up.

PC100024.JPG

PC100025.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For a beginner reloader or even someone who shoots two or three times per month (someone who does not shoot tens of thousands of rounds per year...) my vote goes to the Lee Classic Turret press. It's relatively inexpensive to get started on one of those compared to Big Blue and it's still turns out several hundred rounds of quality ammo per hour. This press allows you to monitor every stage of the reloading cycle for a single cartridge. It makes a great learning tool as it keeps the reloader focused.  

 

The Lee Classic Turret press was my first foray into reloading when I began in 2009. It was easy to set up and even easier to operate. Within an hour I was comfortably reloading cowboy ammo. While not a high-volume reloader, I figure I've reloaded around 25,000 rounds on this without a hiccup. But for 1 high primer I've never had a bad reload on this machine.

 

With additional die plates I'm  now set up for three different calibers on one machine. 

 

Cost effective? Yes. Easy to operate? Yes. Easy to maintain safe reloading practices? Yes. Reloads quality ammunition? Yes.  (If the user doesn't do something stupid.;) )

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Dusty Ed SASS #30639 said:

YOU ARE RIGHT

Started reloading in 1960 with a Lyman 310 tool for 38spl. & 357 mag I then step up to Lee Truline jr I reloaded fr all rifles an handguns with it I was stating to build quite a collection ,Then I bought an RCBS JR. An then a RCBS ROCKCHUCKER AN Then in the late 70's DILLION making waves ,I bought an 450 , Later on I converted to a 550 for $50. I bought Numerous Coversion kits an a CASE FEEDER This was done over decades. If you are into guns an don't have a lot of money you have to start Small an work your way up.

PC100024.JPG

PC100025.JPG

 

Nice reloading set up.  Mine is much smaller do to space limitations but has everything to get the job done.  On small or specialized projects I clamp a powder measure next to the MEC.  I have a closed cabinet just to the left where my dies, brass, wads, etc. are stored.

 

 

IMG_20180614_075801485.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Dantankerous said:

For a beginner reloader or even someone who shoots two or three times per month (someone who does not shoot tens of thousands of rounds per year...) my vote goes to the Lee Classic Turret press. It's relatively inexpensive to get started on one of those compared to Big Blue and it's still turns out several hundred rounds of quality ammo per hour. This press allows you to monitor every stage of the reloading cycle for a single cartridge. It makes a great learning tool as it keeps the reloader focused.  

 

The Lee Classic Turret press was my first foray into reloading when I began in 2009. It was easy to set up and even easier to operate. Within an hour I was comfortably reloading cowboy ammo. While not a high-volume reloader, I figure I've reloaded around 25,000 rounds on this without a hiccup. But for 1 high primer I've never had a bad reload on this machine.

 

With additional die plates I'm  now set up for three different calibers on one machine. 

 

Cost effective? Yes. Easy to operate? Yes. Easy to maintain safe reloading practices? Yes. Reloads quality ammunition? Yes.  (If the user doesn't do something stupid.;) )

 

 

 

 

I use a Lee Classic Turret for 32SW, 38SW, 44-40, 38-55 & 45-70.  They are very good presses. easy to change caliber with, simple, inexpensive, and they work. I use my Dillon for high volume 38sp, everything else on the turret. I can easily do 100-150 rounds per hour or so on it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Hoss said:

I use a Lee Classic Turret for 32SW, 38SW, 44-40, 38-55 & 45-70.  They are very good presses. easy to change caliber with, simple, inexpensive, and they work. I use my Dillon for high volume 38sp, everything else on the turret. I can easily do 100-150 rounds per hour or so on it. 

 

I've been following this thread with attention to real world results and ease of learning. I'm new to the sport (look at my SASS number) and returning to reloading after an absence of over 20 years. I "discovered" the turret type presses while looking at others and started thinking this might be a good idea for me since I want to pay attention to what I'm doing as well recognize I'm trying to do something to get me away from home office that already sucks 60-70 hours a week of my time. This should be fun and relaxing, right?

 

To start seeing comments about the turret press and its ease of use, dependability and the varied loads that can be produced, I think this is the way to go for this older newbie.

 

Thanks for entertaining me over the last week. I've learned a lot and you helped me make a decision I can live with.

 

Johnny

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Johnny Reno said:

 

I've been following this thread with attention to real world results and ease of learning. I'm new to the sport (look at my SASS number) and returning to reloading after an absence of over 20 years. I "discovered" the turret type presses while looking at others and started thinking this might be a good idea for me since I want to pay attention to what I'm doing as well recognize I'm trying to do something to get me away from home office that already sucks 60-70 hours a week of my time. This should be fun and relaxing, right?

 

To start seeing comments about the turret press and its ease of use, dependability and the varied loads that can be produced, I think this is the way to go for this older newbie.

 

Thanks for entertaining me over the last week. I've learned a lot and you helped me make a decision I can live with.

 

Johnny

It's all about options pard.  Unless I'm in a crunch for time, reloading is my time to relax and wind down.  Welcome to the game.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/8/2018 at 9:20 AM, Hoss said:

I could easily load 400/hr on my Loadmaster as well. Just dont like hand priming. And without a doubt the Loadmaster will load quality ammo. I like Leee equipment, and still use a Lee Turret quite a bit. 

 

I dont think the Dillon is really any faster, but in reality, its not a race, its about loading quality ammo. The main reason I changed is to be able to use a powder check die. I had a squib load followed by an OOB discharge with my 66 last year, and it really shook me up. The squib was my fault,  I had changed out the powder hopper to the spring return type off of my turret instead of the chain return. for some reason the disk was not resetting properly, and I had a few rounds get thru without any powder. 

FWIW, I prefer the RCBS Lockout Die ten to one over the Dillon Powder Check Die. The Dillon will sometimes chirp (giving a false reading) if you run it fast and it trained me to ignore it. The RCBS will NOT let you load a double charge or an empty case. It will LOCK UP the press solid. https://www.opticsplanet.com/rcbs-lock-out-die-87540.html

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Johnny Reno said:

 

I've been following this thread with attention to real world results and ease of learning. I'm new to the sport (look at my SASS number) and returning to reloading after an absence of over 20 years. I "discovered" the turret type presses while looking at others and started thinking this might be a good idea for me since I want to pay attention to what I'm doing as well recognize I'm trying to do something to get me away from home office that already sucks 60-70 hours a week of my time. This should be fun and relaxing, right?

 

To start seeing comments about the turret press and its ease of use, dependability and the varied loads that can be produced, I think this is the way to go for this older newbie.

 

Thanks for entertaining me over the last week. I've learned a lot and you helped me make a decision I can live with.

 

Johnny

Welcome to the fun Johnny! If I could only have one press it would be the Lee Turret. Check out Titan Reloading for the best prices I've found. I think the Lee Classic is better that the Value press.Just a little more substantial. order an extra handful of the square plastic gizmo for the indexing rod. its a weak link, but they only cost about .50 each.  They do wear out, but simple enough to change. 

 

how to meet you down the trail! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Buck D. Law, SASS #62183 said:

FWIW, I prefer the RCBS Lockout Die ten to one over the Dillon Powder Check Die. The Dillon will sometimes chirp (giving a false reading) if you run it fast and it trained me to ignore it. The RCBS will NOT let you load a double charge or an empty case. It will LOCK UP the press solid. https://www.opticsplanet.com/rcbs-lock-out-die-87540.html

 

I do have a RCBS Lockout die on my Dillon. I'm not sure I have it 100% adjusted correctly. It certainly works but if I have a case come thru with no powder it crushed the case. (I had a problem with my powder drop, since fixed, but had a few come thru with no powder) I intentionally checked an empty case last night, and it crumpled the case mouth. I think part of the problem is i'm using Bullseye powder, so there is not a lot of volume to work with. but I'd rather lose a case on occasion than have a squib sneak thru. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Lee Classic Turret press is very well built. Very stout except for those tiny little plastic indexing things previously mentioned. You can always go to Lee's website and buy small parts and have a few extra on hand. I imagine all reloaders have small parts that wear out so this is probably a total non-issue with decision-making between one brand or another.

 

The turret press is not a super duper high volume output reloader but it's not supposed to be. When I'm humming along and have everything in place I can get close to 400 rounds per hour. And at a more relaxed pace I'll do 250 to 300 rounds per hour pretty comfortably. I find the benefit of being able to watch each stage on a single cartridge gives me great confidence in the ability to reload safe and reliable ammunition every time. Not sure that is possible with a progressive where you have the machine multitasking for the operator.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Something I've found helps with that drive collar is to lightly lube the turret where it rides on the frame and to polish the drive rod some so the collar has little resistance.  I probably had 10K on the last drive collar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Hoss said:

I do have a RCBS Lockout die on my Dillon. I'm not sure I have it 100% adjusted correctly. It certainly works but if I have a case come thru with no powder it crushed the case. (I had a problem with my powder drop, since fixed, but had a few come thru with no powder) I intentionally checked an empty case last night, and it crumpled the case mouth. I think part of the problem is i'm using Bullseye powder, so there is not a lot of volume to work with. but I'd rather lose a case on occasion than have a squib sneak thru. 

4

That's funky. I'd contact RCBS and see if they had any input. In the meantime, I'd go over the setup again. Here's a video I found on YouTube. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I started typing up a long list of my own personal history with reloading, but it boils down to this:

 

I started in '84 in highschool on an RCBS single to do 30-30 for hunting season.  Learned to make very accurate ammo rather quickly from a great mentor who had a great system. 

Had a used Horniday 4 stage in the 90's but never used it because I was afraid I'd mess up with it as I no longer had a mentor to watch over my sholder.  Got interested in other things and stopped shooting for a while.

When I started this game last year, it was clear I was going to need to reload, but I was out of practice, however my brother uses a Dillon 450 and loved it.  I thought about getting a Square Deal as I only plan on reloading straight wall ammo, but got a 550C because I may start loading .223 at some point.

The video that came with the press and the call I made when I had trouble configuring powder drop correctly set my mind at total ease.  And has put my wife at ease as well.

 

My advice to new re-loaders:

Get a mentor.  Talk to the guys in your home club and find someone willing to show you the ropes.

If you can afford it, get a Dillon.  Get the one you can afford. The fact that there is a number you call to talk to someone who knows the press intimately makes it worth it.

Get the low primer warning alarm.  Once you get comfortable with the accuracy of the press and start getting yourself into the grove of loading, it will save you from yourself.  (Nothing worse than getting in the groove and realizing 150 rounds in that you haven't loaded primers and the last 48 rounds you just ran have been lightly dumping powder all over and now will need to be pulled apart and done over.)

Get a bullet puller and don't be afraid to use it if you think something is wrong.

If you can afford it, get a conversion kit for every caliber and configuration you're going to load and lock them in.

If you only want to use one powder throw, then get a precission measure throw for it.

 

And my own personal preference, but you don't have to:

De-prime your brass before cleaning.  Personally I think a clean primer pocket solves potential issues before they can creep in.

Use poly-coated bullets.  I find I don't need to lube cases, and I have yet needed to clean my loading dies (But I'm only about 20K rounds through it at this point.)

Get a case gauge and use it for every round.  Not only does this help me identify rounds that might not feed well in my rifle, it forces me to slow down and inspect for other flaws I might otherwise miss.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As the red vs blue debate wages on I continue to loan quality ammo on my Green RCBS Pro 2000.  I've had tremendous success with this machine.

 

Do I buy raffle tickets for the 650s at all the matches?  YES!

If I won that 650 would I use it?  OH HELL YES!!!

 

Best Advice:  When choosing a machine make sure to choose one with enough stations to add a "powder cop".  The RCBS Powder Lock Out die has saved my bacon on more than one occasion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎6‎/‎8‎/‎2018 at 11:09 AM, The Original Lumpy Gritz said:

Vote for 'D' here. Have run a D/550 since 1987.

I have 10 primer tubes in LG and 10 in SM.

I load'em up ahead of time, and then there's no issue.

I like the 100 rnd 'break', as I have a chance to case gauge check a few rnds and confirm COAL.

I then take a can of compressed air and blow off the shell plate area.

Take a sip of coffee, and it's back to 'wok'.

OLG

 

I bought a length of Aluminum tubing from Grainger.  Cut to length.  Added the Dillon ends and was up by about 10 tubes.  You might have to run a bit of sanding cloth down the inside so the primers slide easier.

Team that up with a Vibra Prime and I have 10 tubes loaded and ready in just minutes.

I like stopping every 100.  I empty the Akro bin.  Reload the case feeder.  Double check the powder weight. And then take a sip of coffee.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.