Jump to content
SASS Wire Forum

Mental Preparation before going to the Line


McCandless

Recommended Posts

After some, or all,of the above, as I am walking to the firing line I repeat my mantra,

 

”Front sight, trigger, smooth”

 

1st for revolvers,

2nd for rifle,

3rd for loading the SxS.

 

Often results in my best shooting.

 

Amarillo Rattler

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 82
  • Created
  • Last Reply
Guest Texas jack Black SASS#9362

As much as I hate to admit it, Phantom is 100% correct.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Deadeye George said:

I'm glad you typed that because I was just going to ask what the circumstances would be to warrant switching ones drawing sequence. 

 

I shoot Double Duelist so when I'm done with my first pistol I have a free hand.  I want that hand to be doing something.  For instance, if I'm standing at a table with my rifle on it and the rifle is the next gun in the sequence I'll draw my right pistol first.  When that's empty I holster it as I'm drawing my left pistol.  As I'm firing my left pistol my right hand is grabbing my rifle.  When my left pistol is empty I pick up my rifle with my right hand at the same time I'm holstering my left pistol.  Conversely, if the shotgun is the next gun in the sequence but I have to move to get to it I'll draw my left pistol first.  When it's empty I holster it at the same time I'm drawing my right pistol.  As I'm shooting my right pistol I'm pulling my shotgun shells with my left hand.  When the right pistol is empty I move toward the shotgun position while holstering the second pistol and my shotgun shells are ready to go when I get there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Colorado Coffinmaker said:

First and foremost ..... make sure you don't have to Pee.  If you have to Pee, you can't concentrate on anything else.  Trust Me.

  

This +1000000....nuf said!!!!!!  (yep, been there dun that....)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I have to pee or have some other ailment, I have to focus even more and I tend to shoot a faster smoother stage. As you're loading guns count off rounds with the same sequence as the scenario. Better shooters work and pay attention in order to efficiently move through the stage. Don't talk to others at the loading table, focus. Have a plan and stick with it. Total focus wins the match. 

 

When it's time to move, move. When it's time to shoot, shoot. Don't look at other people's scores, shoot your own game. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

There are a lot of shooters that will criticize for getting too serious about the game. In the period of 2002 to about 2007, there were some of us that "got serious" heading for the loading table. By that time the basic stage was outlined in our minds.

Subconscious. When you pick up your guns and head for the loading table, you should have started a routine. Pick up your guns the same way every time. Lay your guns down on the loading the same way every time. Load your guns the same way every time. Once this routine is planted in your subconscious, you can run through the stage without thinking about loading. Getting confused at the loading table sucks. I have threatened bodily harm to Salvadore Dally more than once :) 

I do not engage in conversation at the loading table if I can help it. This is the time to prep the mind, settle the nerves, and shoot the stage in your mind. When you get to that last loading position, bow the head and go over the stage. When you are called to the line go over gun placement and transitions. Don't take the time to think about the "Oh................." thoughts.

I have never had more fun in any discipline than cowboy. And I have never enjoyed getting into the bubble as I have in cowboy. 

After the match, you can have fun with  prime rib and  George Dickel. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Folks,

 

I think I'm a different "cat" than the rest of you. ;)

 

My best match was after getting home at 2:00 a.m., getting up at 6:00 a.m., (that was the early 2000s) and shooting hung over. My first clean stage was after someone made me cry  (again early 2000s).

 

That said, I did have some 20 second stages pre-hand surgery. Every year I get slower (Arthur can be unkind). At my last 12 stage SASS annual (last month), I managed to keep all of my scores in the 40s and 50s, with no Ps, or Safeties, and only two misses.

 

Picking brass has become out of my league for the same physical issue as is the reason for not practicing, shooting more, painting, cleaning house... All I can do without pain at a match is man (woman? LOL) a table, count, or run the timer.

 

I'm not proud of this; but, I try to make fun where I can and enjoy the camaraderie where I find it.

 

My safety net, my Hubby, Jess Brown, is no longer able to shoot. I think he likes that I keep him in touch with the wonderful people we've met in this sport.

 

The best mental preparation for me is to have posse members greet me, especially with a hug and  a howdy.

 

I hope that, if any of you know someone like me, you treat them like their presence matters to you.

 

I thank anyone who took time to read this.

 

Sincerely,

 

Allie Mo

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another great book- With Winning in Mind- Lanny Bassham.  I think it is worth the read- if you mine just one nugget it is worth it...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What can I add??:huh: Not much..

1) Fer sure..  Don't have to pee.. :mellow:

2) What Phantom said... :)

3) Be a spotter to learn the sequence..B)

4) Relax.. Just Relax .. (You'll be a lot smoother) :)

 

Rance ;)

Thinkin' it's all been said here..

 

Oh yeah... :blink: I always draw and shoot my pistols the same..

                         Right or wrong.. That's just me..:huh:

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Doc Shapiro said:

 

Thanks, I went ahead and ordered one.

Appreciate it!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Howdy

A lot of good tips there but I’m missing a few as well so here is my take on it

Preparation starts with the stage briefing, pay attention and if you have a shooters book with the stages, read with the PM, think if there are `smarter` ways to shoot the stage, and if you think of an option you’re not sure of ASK
If possible, try to position yourself for just a moment at the shooting positions and look at the targets, this helps with the mental picture.

Then before you go to the loading table, go back on the range and `walk` the stage parallel to the shooting position so you have a feel for distance and which foot to start, etc.

Then go to the loading table, (be sure you have everything the first time, you don’t to go back) if you have waiting time, go over the stage, sweeps, shots movement, which gun with what hand etc., be as detailed as your brain will let you, load your guns and go true the stage once or twice more( depending on time)

When you are called to the line, pick up your guns with a “I can do this” attitude, place your guns careful at the positions you planed them and let go and just shoot the stage, shooting the stage should be fun, smooth and go automaticly.

As to switching witch pistol to grab first, shoot left to right or right to left etc. DO THE THINGS YOU ARE CONFORTABLE WITH DOING, yes a switch in witch pistol to draw first( maybe because you can’t draw a cross draw with the direction you are walking in) can bring time, shooting right to left can bring time on certain stages, but do that where you are sure you can do it

Make from all of the above, and all other suggestions a routine, and stick to YOUR routine

Just my 2 cents

Dutch Bear

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, Grizzly Dave said:

One thing I've found myself doing as the person in front of me is shooting is closing my eyes and visualizing where the shots are going.

 

In USPSA we called that "The Yoda Zone." ;)

 

"Ready to shoot,I am!"  :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Remember to count to 10.  Remember to count to 10.  Remember to count to 10.

 

I don't want to waste time by running over or stopping short and having to start again and fire out the leftover shots. 

 

With one exception, I don't dry fire practice.  I have practiced gunfighter by pulling the revolvers and going through the motions of aiming at the duplex outlet on the wall and counting to 10. 

 

The dry fire exception was to make dummy caps for the shotgun and practice cocking the hammer shotgun with a sweep of the left hand while operating the top snap with left thumb and shucking. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ALLIE,

I read every word.   You, and others I have met, are an inspiration and a big credit to SASS & CAS.

 

Cyber Hugs and a BIG HOWDY backatcha.

 

:wub:

 

P.S. -  I agree with Phantom.   Just keep it simple and don't let "Proper Preparation Strategy  1 thru 10" confuse yeowndangself.

 

Personally, I shadow shoot (using my fingers) the stage while at the LT.    I never get nervous.   And basically, whether I'm shooting local or at a new place or a big match,  I ALWAYS consider my Posse as my friends and we are all out for a good day of shooting fun.

 

..........Widder

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, Shooting Bull said:

 

This is actually something I actively try to avoid and it takes effort to build the ability to block out everything, including other shooters.  I don't want to hear them for the exact reason you mention, their cadence.  I have my own cadence and I don't want any outside influences to affect that.  I also don't want any negative thoughts creeping into my brain if they happen to mess up. 

 

Totally personal preference though.  If it helps you visualize the stage by mentally tracking their shots then that's what you should do. 

Image result for white noise

Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 hours ago, Colorado Coffinmaker said:

First and foremost ..... make sure you don't have to Pee.  If you have to Pee, you can't concentrate on anything else.  Trust Me.

Yea but you can shoot REAL fast!!!:P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Away from the line I am going thru the stage in my mind. I usually make the motions with my hands. Once I am good with that, on to the loading table. Load my guns. Same thing, go thru the motions with my hands. Will usually close my eyes and see myself running the stage. I try to run the stage 5-10 times in my mind.


I second the "With Winning in Mind" Book. Before I started shooting Gunfighter, I was able to win a few local matches. (not that it was winning EOT or anything but it was a goal to win a local match). This was after reading and applying that book. Now shooting GF for awhile now, I am creeping back up to the Top (locally). I think the Mental Game is what pushes you over the edge to be able to compete at the top. Obviously you need the skill and desire to be at the Top.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Since we're recommending books, Deuce Stevens recommended Zen Golf to me.  Yes, it focuses on the game of golf, but the mental preparation techniques translate to any sport.  Great book if you want to up your mental game.  Thanks Deuce.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Mind Gym" An athlete's guide to inner excellence. By Gary Mack and David Casstevens. Foreword by Alex Rodriguez.

 

Very well written. Emphasis that mental skills, like physical skills require constant practice. And the goal is progress, not perfection.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, Shooting Bull said:

Oops

 

15 hours ago, Shooting Bull said:

Oops

 

Sounds like a WTC is in order here. :P

A double and triple tap. Procedural? :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I prefer to shoot late, and run the timer for 1/3 to 1/2 of the posse,  the whole time "gaming" the stage..  I can shoot early, but prefer late,, or sometimes I just get the itch to "shoot now"  

 

when at the table, I load,,, checking over each round that goes in the rifle,,,, then air shoot the entire stage,,, using my hands for every move,,,, muscle memory,,,    I do this several times,,,

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, Cheyenne Culpepper 32827 said:

when at the table, I load,,, checking over each round that goes in the rifle,,,, then air shoot the entire stage,,, using my hands for every move,,,, muscle memory,,,    I do this several times,,,

 

I learned it by watching you!!! :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

35 minutes ago, Cheyenne Culpepper 32827 said:

when at the table, I load,,, checking over each round that goes in the rifle,,,, then air shoot the entire stage,,, using my hands for every move,,,, muscle memory,,,    I do this several times,,,

 

That don't hardly give you time to pick your nose or scratch yer butt though does it?  :D

 

Then again as fast as you shoot you can handle that stuff at the unloading table soon enough.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you guys for all of the great advice on this thread. I am a new shooter (only 2 months) and I have been trying to figure out ways to become a faster and more accurate shooter. Glad to hear that it isn't just me that turns into a brain dead monkey when the timer goes off.

 

Thanks and God bless,

Mojo

SASS #106938

Link to comment
Share on other sites

ooof!  Some of you folks make this sound too much like work.  I'm over here thinking:  Say "Howdy", load guns, be safe & shoot.  Yee Haaa!!

 

Even if I practisized and concertrated like the masters I'm not gonna win any prizes.  I consider myself a good shot but I don't expect I'll ever be a fastest shot.  Heck, I can't dump 'em in the dirt as fast as some of you guys can shoot AND hit the targets.

 

Ya'll just continue to zenify your shooting.  I'll be on the sidelines staring in awe of your talent and hugging Miss Allie.  I'm sure we can all have fun together.  (But, if I'm hugging Miss Allie, I WIN!!!)

 

Angus

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Mojo Rising said:

Thank you guys for all of the great advice on this thread. I am a new shooter (only 2 months) and I have been trying to figure out ways to become a faster and more accurate shooter. Glad to hear that it isn't just me that turns into a brain dead monkey when the timer goes off.

 

Thanks and God bless,

Mojo

SASS #106938

learn to be fast,,,, THEN learn to shoot with as few misses as possible

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Grizzly Dave said:

 

That don't hardly give you time to pick your nose or scratch yer butt though does it?  :D

 

Then again as fast as you shoot you can handle that stuff at the unloading table soon enough.

and breathe again too

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/8/2018 at 11:45 AM, Colorado Coffinmaker said:

First and foremost ..... make sure you don't have to Pee.  If you have to Pee, you can't concentrate on anything else.  Trust Me.

At your age, how do you even make it through the stage?:P:D:P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Grizzly Dave said:

That don't hardly give you time to pick your nose or scratch yer butt though does it?  :D

Prior to individual stage prep is the time for joking, goofing, inappropriate brass picking antics, off color jokes and nose picking.

As anyone that has ever shot on a posse with myself and Gawd Awful together can attest; there is time for shenanigans.

But, when it's time to get ready for the stage; focus and concentration is called for.  

And once I hit the loading table; I have no interest in being social or doing anything that is not related to my stage prep.

I close my eyes and visualize the staging, prop manipulation, every transition and draw.  Seeing in my mind's eye - every shot on target, sights in perfect focus and alignment.

I shoot the sequence; airgunning every shot and acting out every move. 

And if it felt right, I'll do it again.

If something feels wrong; I will stop and rewind to that point so I can correct or adjust.

I will attempt to consider starting hand, starting foot, position of first gun, spot of first discard.  And then ill airgun shoot the sequence again.

Upon the shooter ahead of me completing their stage; I cease my mental prep.

While the brass is being picked up and targets reset; I again check my physical prep.  Pistols set properly in holsters, shotgun shell loops filled and belt in proper position.  Ear plugs seated.  Roll my neck and pop my knuckles.  Taking deeper than normal breathes to ensure my oxygen levels are sufficient to get thru the next few moments if I forget to breathe.

When I am called to line; I am still studying the target array, staging tables, distances between positions.  All to ensure my visualization exercises at the loading table match the reality. 

At the moment before the beep; I have done the best I can do to prepare for the stage and trust that these steps will carry me thru the shooting and actions required.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.