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Hoss

94 Winchester in 38-55

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I’ve about decided to pull the trigger on a new Miriku Winchester Sporter, 24” barrel in 38-55. (Vs a Marlin) 

 

looking for info....what brass (2.125 or 2.08? Bullet diameter/weight? Maybe  a pet load (pm that please!) 

 

any drawbacks I should know about? 

 

I would use this rifle for Cody Dixon matches and occasional long range side matches. 

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For the Miriku  Winchester they spec a Winchester 38-55 which is a 2.08 case.

 

Yes you can shoot it in the rifle caliber.

 

I will try to PM you.

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I think they still have the safety on the tang the Marlin doesn't , If you shoot black powder you can clean the marlin from the breech by removing the bolt or smokeless powder for that matter .

 Woodfox 

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I have two, one a 1894 made in 1895 (26 inch ) and an Alberta 75 Jubliee made in 1980 (20 inch )

The mature gun needs bullets sized .381 , the other one uses  bullets sized .379...

Both do fine with RNFP bullets over Reloader 7 at 1,450 for Cowboy and 1,902 Fps. for hunting ... the bullets weigh 251 grains ....

 

Jabez Cowboy

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I have a whole bunch of 38-55 Rifles....My Japanese Winchester model 94 is easily one of the most accurate.

 

I use the short brass with a LEE 250g cast bullet of 1-20 lead. I'd tell you the load of Unique powder but that's not allowed here. Be assured, it is very little powder with a 3/4" X 3/4" piece of single ply toilet paper to keep the powder against the primer. Has won me a number of side matches over the last three years! 

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Howdy,

I don't want to rain on any parades but a good friend of mine tried 38-55 and

got reeeeeeeellly frustrated at reloading for it.

He went back to 45-70 and I helped him sell off the gear.

Im sure others have had better luck.

Im told the 3030 can be loaded near 38-55 performance much less fuss.

I do feel I need my nomex pants for some reason......

Just a heads up, ymmv.

Best

CR

 

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What frustrated him Ron? The only issue I have had loading for my 38-55 is I bought the wrong size brass

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Fuss? What fuss? And let us not forget, the 38-55 was the benchrest record holder until the 1920s. You would have a hard time getting a 45-70 to shoot as accurately as a 38-55......just say’n

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The original length of a 38-55 Ballard was 2.122". 38-55 Winchester original brass was/is 2.125. Groove diameter was .379. Or 381. 0r 380. Along comes the 30-30 and Winchester shortens the case. The 32-40 is mixed in here in the same manner. Some 32-40s may have been formed to 30-30 specs. None the less, the 375 Winchester has a .376 groove diameter and the case is shorter than 2.125 original 38-55.  And, until Starline came along with long brass with thin necks, one used the short case in the 38-55 to get cast lead bullets to chamber. Or shooters screwed up their Marlins and had them "throated".

If any of you have an old Marlin that will not chamber the proper bullet for the groove, contact Dave Manson and get a reamer designed by M. L. McPherson to open the mouth of the chamber. Not the throat, just the neck area of the case chamber.

I am not aware what groove diameter the Miroku 38-55 barrel is but I would suspect it is .376. 

I can tell you that if you order a rifle from C Sharps chambered for the 38-55 you will get a .376 grooved barrel.

 

The 38-55 has great inate accuracy but you better had read up on the round. Soak up the posts on ASSRA and the BPCR forum. They know what works. From 100 to 1000 yards. 

If the Miroku has an 1:18 twist and a .376 groove diameter, shoot 12-18 Brinell 265 gr. lead cast bullets at around 1100 fps and you should do good. 

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I just sold my 1906 mfg Winchester M94 in .38-55 w/ a 26" barrel last month. 17-18 years ago I ran the rifle using SR-4759 and I had excellent accuracy out to 200 yds with it. In the past 4-5 years I have run a couple of thousand cast lead bullets through that rifle  using at least 6 different powders trying to match that accuracy with no joy. I just gave on the gun. I, for one wish that SR-4759 would be re-introduced but I guess we are too small a market for the big powder companies.

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My dad use to tell me stories about deer hunting with a 38-55 when he was a boy, and what a great cartridge it was for hunting here in the woods of the NE. About 10 years ago I really wanted one, and there was a 1979 Winchester Legendary Frontiersman Commemorative in the box at a gun action. I did some research and found out that it really never increased in value from its original sale price in 1979. I bought it for $525 and have been shooting it ever since. It is one heck of an accurate rifle/cartridge, and I won a few big bore competitions with it. I reload with IMR 4895 and a 262 grain .379 lead bullet with gas check. 

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Folks , I am gonna give y'all some hard earned learnin' 

 

  1st thing to do with a 38-55 , is to swedge the bore ,  I have seen the bores mesure from .375 to .383 

 

  had 1 Win , with a.375 , 0ne with a .377 . and one with a .379 , different years of mfg 

 

 Marlins , that I have seen all had .379 bores , 

 

 H&R single shots have had .379 bores , but had a tight neck 

 

 the Numrich barrels for the 94 Win , have a .375 bore 

 

  original 38-55s , have been up to .383 , due to wear , I think 

 

  maybe this will help someone out , I found it the hard way 

 

  CB 

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