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Al OVERA, SASS#26238 Life

SKB Question

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Looking at the horrendious prices asked (and gotten) for SKBs, my question is: what makes them worth these asking prices?? I have handled and shot them, but fail to see what the aura is for them. I have been using a Stoeger for the last 10 years and have had NO issues with it, and they only cost 400.00. Is it just the glam factor ie: Colt vs Ruger, or am I missing something? Inquiring mind.

 

Happy New Year to All.

Al

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If you don't value the benefits of an SKB, then you don't. It's a personal preference.

 

But the fastest cowboy shooters like the light weight, reliable function, the long life, of an SKB. For them, the price is worth it.

 

Don't know anyone shooting SKB just for "glam" - they shoot them for performance!

 

or am I missing something

 

Possibly. :lol: Only your shot timer and score sheet can tell you for sure.

 

Good luck, GJ

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They are lighter, have thinner wrists, and can have a bump step modification done to them. These were the biggest reasons that my times dropped when I switched from my stoeger.

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They also haven't been made in 30 years, so scarcity also drives prices.

Pards have no problem paying $1350-$1650 for a race ready 73 but moan about the price of a tuned SKB or BSS.

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They also haven't been made in 30 years, so scarcity also drives prices.

Pards have no problem paying $1350-$1650 for a race ready 73 but moan about the price of a tuned SKB or BSS.

 

 

I didn't moan; I paid it cheerfully! :P

 

From a former Stoeger shooter...

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Here is a test for you.....close your eyes and point each one of them. This should answer your question. I found out how well they feel & shoot 8 or 9 years ago and bought 2 from Johnny Meadows. Never looked back.

 

Looks like it was a good investment for sure.

Edited by Big Sage, SASS #49891 Life

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Plenty of shooters use Stoegers, I did when I started. Bought 3 slicked by cowboy smiths plus 1 I worked myself. Broke the barrel lugs on 2 and the stock on the other 2 in the first 3 years. Mixed and matched to get two running, sold em as parts guns and bought my first SKB from Johnny Meadows. Have two others (also slicked by JM) now but the first one is my go to gun after 6 years of hard use.

YMMV

Regards

 

Gateway Kid

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SKB is just a whole lot better..well that's my thinkin' & I'm sticking to it..changed to a 200E 7 months ago & love it !! All slicked up & works a treat..bought for a bargain so that helped .

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I am not fast and will never be fast,I started way to late after I had lots of my parts worked on.I had a CZ ,nice shotgun,I had two stoegers,did not like the way they pointed for me.I traded for two single trigger baikal from Johnny Meadows and love them.Then I got Johnny Meadows to do a SKB for me.Like I said I am not fast but I am faster with my SKB than with my baikal.They both point great but the SKB handles better for me.The SKB is .6 lbs. lighter than the baikal and the SKB has 22" barrels and the baikal has 20".The SKB is just a nicer feeling shotgun.PS it is not the money,I have less in my SKB than I do In my Baikal.I shoot my P model 357 and I have a pair of super short stroked rugers 357 done by a great smith.It is a matter of what feels best to me.

Edited by Pit Bull Tex

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Back when I was shootin skeet I thought my Baretta was a great shotgun(and it is) Then one day a friend let me shoot his Krieghoff the difference was amazing so I saved up and bought one. Same with my SXS started with a Bakal, shot a friends SKB now I shoot an SKB .

Happy New year everyone Bandit

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I have two SKB's , but I don't know what the "bump stop modification" is. What is it,, please?

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They are lighter, have thinner wrists, and can have a bump step modification done to them. These were the biggest reasons that my times dropped when I switched from my stoeger.

What is a "bump step" modification?

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It's a stay open feature that good SKB smiths can cut into the lug. Not a mod to attempt yourself. It was very useful before the new closed action rule but still a great option to keep it open when discarding.

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I have two SKB's , but I don't know what the "bump stop modification" is. What is it,, please?

An extra little notch put in a lug to hold gun open better while handling and staging. Not enough to notice while shooting tho.

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At 1400 dollars, it's the cheapest gun in the cart. A good rifle is close to 2k, and pistols a little over 2k. A good sg, and a good loading technique will take a lot of time off your runs.

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What is a "bump step" modification?

What the others have said. Sometimes easier to show than explain by text.

 

Edited by Smokestack

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I have 3 SKB's.... I Love Em !!

1 for smokeless, 1 for BP and 1 for Clays

Two of em I got before CAS discovered them and they were still reasonably priced.

The 3rd I paid too much for, but the gun is worth it in my eyes.......

 

I've also owned Baikals and Stoegers they wear and sometimes are hard to get parts for if you break something.

 

I just finished completely taking down, cleaning and reassembling my oldest SKB for some way overdue maintenance

After removing the years of gunk buildup inside the SKB and closely inspecting all the parts.......

there is absolutely zero perceptible wear on any part of the gun.

That is one reason that SKB's are so valuable.

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Looking at the horrendious prices asked (and gotten) for SKBs, my question is: what makes them worth these asking prices?? I have handled and shot them, but fail to see what the aura is for them. I have been using a Stoeger for the last 10 years and have had NO issues with it, and they only cost 400.00. Is it just the glam factor ie: Colt vs Ruger, or am I missing something? Inquiring mind.

 

Happy New Year to All.

Al

I wouldn't switch then. I had the opposite feeling so the decision was easy. I was at a match and trained wrecked a 97 and Dirt Merchant & Fast Eddie told me I should try to shoot a double. I told them I tried a few doubles and hated them. Dirt was just starting to build SKB's and he took me over to his truck and showed me 3 SKB's he had just built. I picked it up and feel in love with it right OFF the bat. That was the single best move I ever made in SASS.

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At 1400 dollars, it's the cheapest gun in the cart. A good rifle is close to 2k, and pistols a little over 2k. A good sg, and a good loading technique will take a lot of time off your runs.

+1

I have shot every common SASS shotgun and found the Browning BSS and the SKB to be the most pleasant to shoot. I am currently shooting the SKB and have no plans to ever change to anything else. Neither the BSS or the SKB are cheap, but they are both great shotguns that will last as long as you probably will shoot SASS, so they are a good investment. Guns that break tend to take the fun out of shooting.

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+1

I have shot every common SASS shotgun and found the Browning BSS and the SKB to be the most pleasant to shoot. I am currently shooting the SKB and have no plans to ever change to anything else. Neither the BSS or the SKB are cheap, but they are both great shotguns that will last as long as you probably will shoot SASS, so they are a good investment. Guns that break tend to take the fun out of shooting.

+1!!!

 

Nothing more frustrating than a broke gun!

 

I started with a baikal double trigger and it was a tank! That being said it handles like a tank too! I owned two and bother are on their third owner and still kicking! However once I switched to an SKB I never looked back! I think I have owned 7 of various configurations and am now back down to a more reasonable three! :wacko: One for smokeless, one for BP and one with a hang tag still on it. All engraved 100's, and NO you can't have any of them! ;):D

 

WK

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If your are going to shoot a hammerless double the SKB is the way to go! Have it tricked out by Johnny Meadows or one of the other fine smiths that work on these guns.

If you watch any of the shoot offs at any big match 9 times out of 10 the shotgun makes or breaks the competition.

Watch any good shooter, other than transitions its the shotgun that make the difference.

 

TB

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Saw this thread on the SKB shotguns and I am wondering what is the difference between the 100, 150 & 280? Seems that pricing is similar on used models for the various model numbers. I am researching possible upgrade from a Baikal SXS Bounty Hunter II.

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Saw this thread on the SKB shotguns and I am wondering what is the difference between the 100, 150 & 280? Seems that pricing is similar on used models for the various model numbers. I am researching possible upgrade from a Baikal SXS Bounty Hunter II.

100's typically have splinter forends and generally non switchable as far as which barrel fires first, 200's usually have beaver tail forends and switchable between which barrel fires first, 280's (the few that I have seen) seem to be a nicer grade of wood with a straight English type stock. The 100 and 200 models are usually pistol grip stocks. Have seen several where the forends are opposite (splinter on 200, beaver tail on 100) don't know if the shooter switched or they came that way. Have never actually seen a 150 so can't say there but I seem to recall someone saying they are a 100 with nicer engraving. There are plenty of other combinations of forend, stock type, quantity/quality of engraving etc which may be factory and may be shooter changed.

I like the 200 version with beaver tail forend and pistol grip. Mine have a conversion to a mechanical rather than an inertial switch between barrels so the button to switch is locked in place. I am a larger cowboy :P 6 feet and 260 so the larger 200 fits me better.

YMMV

 

Regards

 

:FlagAm::FlagAm::FlagAm:

 

Gateway Kid

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For what it's worth, all 12g SKB's that I have seen are chambered for 2 3/4" until I purchased one that is marked for 3".

 

Not sure how common 3" chambered SKB is, but I plan to keep it as-is for hunting.

 

Edited to correct chamber dimension.

Edited by Lead Foot Luke

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For what it's worth, all 12g SKB's that I have seen are chambered for 2 1/2" until I purchased one that is marked for 3".

 

Not sure how common 3" chambered SKB is, but I plan to keep it as-is for hunting.

I find that hard to believe as many SKBs were made in the 70s and 80s and by then many shells were plastic in a length of 2- 3/4. Below is a 1969 catalog of the Ithaca SKBs showing all their 12 ga guns had 2 3/4 inch chambers.

 

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&ved=0ahUKEwjvwb7GsNvRAhVLPrwKHT6zBhUQFgg3MAc&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.skbshotguns.com%2Fpdf%2FITHACA-69-2.pdf&usg=AFQjCNGszlSbhCq4Blc5Gi5A2TUS8XjxHA&bvm=bv.145063293,d.dGc&cad=rja

Edited by Gold Canyon Kid #43974
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100's typically have splinter forends and generally non switchable as far as which barrel fires first

Regards

 

Gateway Kid

My splinter forend 100 is switchable.

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100's typically have splinter forends and generally non switchable as far as which barrel fires first, 200's usually have beaver tail forends and switchable between which barrel fires first, 280's (the few that I have seen) seem to be a nicer grade of wood with a straight English type stock. The 100 and 200 models are usually pistol grip stocks. Have seen several where the forends are opposite (splinter on 200, beaver tail on 100) don't know if the shooter switched or they came that way. Have never actually seen a 150 so can't say there but I seem to recall someone saying they are a 100 with nicer engraving. There are plenty of other combinations of forend, stock type, quantity/quality of engraving etc which may be factory and may be shooter changed.

I like the 200 version with beaver tail forend and pistol grip. Mine have a conversion to a mechanical rather than an inertial switch between barrels so the button to switch is locked in place. I am a larger cowboy :P 6 feet and 260 so the larger 200 fits me better.

YMMV

 

Regards

 

:FlagAm::FlagAm::FlagAm:

 

Gateway Kid

Between my sons and myself we have 6 or 7 SKBs, all but one is a 100. All have switchable triggers.

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Glad to hear so many have switchable 100's. I only had 2, neither of which were switchable. Sold them and moved on to 200's because I liked their feel better.

3 modified for cowboy, shortened, polished and mechanical reset, no longer switchable. 2 coin finish more or less stock with full length barrels and switchable.

As far as using the button to change which barrel fires first never really found it all that useful.

All my opinion of course as stated and in my experience which was all that was asked for.

Regards

 

Gateway Kid

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Just got my first SKB, have been shooting Stoegers, both double and single triggers. Sent the Skb to Broomstick-Jay, after reading this thread can't wait to get mine back and start shooting it. Thanks all for all of the info placed here. Bulldog Brown

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100's typically have splinter forends and generally non switchable as far as which barrel fires first, 200's usually have beaver tail forends and switchable between which barrel fires first, 280's (the few that I have seen) seem to be a nicer grade of wood with a straight English type stock. The 100 and 200 models are usually pistol grip stocks. Have seen several where the forends are opposite (splinter on 200, beaver tail on 100) don't know if the shooter switched or they came that way. Have never actually seen a 150 so can't say there but I seem to recall someone saying they are a 100 with nicer engraving. There are plenty of other combinations of forend, stock type, quantity/quality of engraving etc which may be factory and may be shooter changed.

I like the 200 version with beaver tail forend and pistol grip. Mine have a conversion to a mechanical rather than an inertial switch between barrels so the button to switch is locked in place. I am a larger cowboy :P 6 feet and 260 so the larger 200 fits me better.

YMMV

 

Regards

 

:FlagAm::FlagAm::FlagAm:

 

Gateway Kid

The 100-150-200 and 280 ALL have single selective triggers which allows for changing the first barrel fired except for a very few early doubles trigger guns.

Generally once a mechanical trigger is added the selective trigger feature is rendered nonfunctional.

For ends were available in both beaver and splinter for all the guns if ordered. Usually the 150-200-280 all came with beaver tails , the 100 usually came with the splinter as it was the base grade gun. Sold new in the 70's for $150 or less

Edited by Dirt Merchant # 61422

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