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Hikes Point Hank

When to rotate steel targets

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I've found it a little difficult to find information on when to turn, rotate, reverse or flip steel targets on the internet. I also want to let more shooters know how to tell when their targets need to be reversed. Might save a little aggravation and money as well. Its not as "obvious" as one might think.

Can somebody help me find a reputable article?

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Hey friend... is somethin' that is necessary? Or are you shootin' higher velocities than SASS?

 

I've had my targets up for years... just spray paint... ever now and then... to keep 'em from rustin'.

 

I'd like to understand this...

 

Thanks for respondin' in advance...

 

ts

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Hank, I think you'll get the best results if you flip them every match or so.

 

Happy New Year to all.

 

Randy

 

 

Whoa... whoa... whoa... there Saint. Let's slow down a bit... I think I'm missin' somethin'.

 

My targets are Arnst (sp?)... and they ain't got a dent in 'em.

 

Why flip 'em?... just want to understand.

 

ts

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I have steel that has bowed in quite a bit. Cheap stuff, not target steel. I flip them when I see the bow start. This is at my cabin, not a CAS range BTW.

When they get too bad a light them up with penetrator rounds and throw them in the swamp.

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I think you mean Arntzen, Stud.

 

Just rotating them ain't gonna get it.

Ya gotta know how to rotate em (and why helps).

Kinda like doin an alignment on a front end of a vehicle... If it needs it by all means do it. If the tires are wearing fine then why bother. The person doing the alignment might throw off a good thing...I used to do alignments, ya gotta trust me on this one.

 

So a target is bowing after a few months of monthly matches and lots of impacts...Well, which way is it bowing and why? If it's not bowing should you rotate it just because? If it ain't broke...well, just sayin.

 

Arntzen has a brief explanation on their home page but I'm having difficulties finding other possibly more detailed info. Let's give this one time to steep a little. I think you just might be surprised how this actually works.

 

And I hope it helps some clubs out money wise cause that steel ain't cheap.

Edited by Hikes Point Hank

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I think you mean Arntzen, Stud.

 

 

Thank you, friend... even though I did qualify my original reply... with a (sp?)... after the name. Just TOO lazy to look up stuff.

 

Hope that does not disqualify me from further postin's... on this thread.

 

Thanks again,

 

ts

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We use 3/8 thick AR400 steel. That's hard enough that if someone shoots jacketed bullets they won't put dents in it. But it will start to bow it if shot enough even with cowboy loads. We usually reverse our targets at the beginning of the shooting season and then again before the State shoot.

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Whoa... whoa... whoa... there Saint. Let's slow down a bit... I think I'm missin' somethin'.

 

My targets are Arnst (sp?)... and they ain't got a dent in 'em.

 

Why flip 'em?... just want to understand.

 

ts

They will definitely bow with enough shots on them without flipping them.

 

Randy

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Hey Saint... ya know... there is period in one's life of diminishin' returns... and this is mine.

 

Next time I can come over at the first day... or mid-month matches... I will bring and contribute all of my targets. You will be able to see that my targets are not bowed.

 

My eyesight is failin'... along with my health. Been slidin' into homeplate after havin' stomped my own gluteus maximus into oblivion... for years.

 

I also have a popper, new in the box... had it for 15 years... never been used. Gonna give it to... you... Will Reilly, Preston... Whiskey Hayes... and the remainder of you heathens. Hope you will accept my contribution.

 

ts

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The answer might be as simple as having your number one posse shoot and hit where the bowing isn't, as they should be that accurate, and if not, they get a penalty. LOL

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Consider that shootin' at a steel target without any supporting structure on the reverse is like hammering that same piece steel repeatedly. It will bow... away from the point of impact. So, turn it around and hammer it from the other side a while.

 

Another reason to rotate is for pitting. Pitted steel with be the #1 cause of fragmented lead and it's direction of travel is related to the point of impact on the pit. If it ain't bowed, but is pitted, fill the pits with hard face rod like you'd use for welding tool steel. Grind smooth again.

 

Having the steel hang loose at an angle that deflects lead into dirt will reduce the bowing effect, by allowing the steel to swing, absorbing some of the impact.

 

Wharthog shooters are not friends to your steel.

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According to the home page for Arntzen Targets

Soft steel will bow away (concave)

 

Hard steel will bow towards the shooter (convex)

 

Don't most clubs use hard steel these days?

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Hikes Point Hank, on 31 Dec 2016 - 08:06 AM, said:

According to the home page for Arntzen Targets

Soft steel will bow away (concave)

 

Hard steel will bow towards the shooter (convex)

 

Don't most clubs use hard steel these days?

 

I guess that would depend on the number of club members and how much money the club has to buy steel. AR steel is quite a bit more than plain old steel regardless of thickness. There's a couple of clubs I've shot at that are still using mild steel because that's what they can afford. They do rotate the targets more frequently just because they can't afford AR steel and it helps the targets last longer.

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Hey Saint... ya know... there is period in one's life of diminishin' returns... and this is mine.

 

Next time I can come over at the first day... or mid-month matches... I will bring and contribute all of my targets. You will be able to see that my targets are not bowed.

 

My eyesight is failin'... along with my health. Been slidin' into homeplate after havin' stomped my own gluteus maximus into oblivion... for years.

 

I also have a popper, new in the box... had it for 15 years... never been used. Gonna give it to... you... Will Reilly, Preston... Whiskey Hayes... and the remainder of you heathens. Hope you will accept my contribution.

 

ts

Stud, thanks, I'm sure anything will be welcomed and appreciated. Just saw a weather forecast, doesn't look like we'll be shooting next Saturday.

 

Happy New Year

 

Randy

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From the article Blue Wolf is referring to:

 

There appears to be some confusion as to if and when it is appropriate to turn steel targets over, in an attempt to get additional life out of them. It is our intent to clear that issue up, and share some general information with those tasked with range equipment maintenance.

 

To apply some context, years ago the steel being used for targets was primarily T1, manufactured by U.S. Steel. It had a Brinell hardness rating of about 235. When it was shot a lot, it would become concaved (i.e. dented in), in the impact area.

 

The steel we use at MGM Targets today has a Brinell rating of 500 and does not become concave when shot. 500 Brinell steel is much harder and consequently, the result of bullet impacts is dramatically different.

 

Envision a penny on an anvil being struck repeatedly with a hammer. It gets much thinner, and at the same time, larger in diameter. Exactly the same thing is happening to the face of our pistol targets as we pound them with bullets. The hardness of the current steel allows only the front of the target to be peened, (enlarged). Therefore, if the near side of the target is growing (from the constant hammering) but the back side does not grow, the only thing that can happen is for the target to bow. It will often become CONVEXED, and bow toward the shooter - Yes, exactly opposite of what T-1 targets do.

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