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Anyone see the article in Guns of the Old West magazine (fall issue) about the Evans rifle. Interesting read, there still out there and you apparently use .44 mag brass, black powder only of course.

 

I wonder if the Evans is SASS legal???

 

Rye

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I've seen a pard shoot one in SASS. It was kind of slow loading compared to a 66, 73 or Marlin. He has also used a Spencer on occasion. He has fun using those old guns. He also has a brace of Merwin Hulberts that he uses.

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I used to own one, ridiculously slow to load. It would be a nightmare at the loading table. Might not be legal as the Evans rounds were rifle rounds and never chambered in a pistol.

No but it will work with .44 mag brass according to the article. I noticed there's no external hammer though, I wonder if that would be a factor??

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No but it will work with .44 mag brass according to the article. I noticed there's no external hammer though, I wonder if that would be a factor??

Talking about an Evans and maybe some snubbies; you coming back to the Dark Side? ;)

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http://www.leverguns.com/articles/blancard/evans.htm

 

Very interesting. In looking at the rule book, the only thing I see that would possibly be against it is the calibre. I agree that using 44 mag would seem to let it in. I would not oppose it's use were I to be the MD where the question was raised. As for whether it is "competitive" I seriously doubt that anyone would chose this design to attempt to be more "competitive". Sometimes folks still do thing simply because they are fun.

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Rye,

 

Why would you want to shoot this rifle, it will be an unfair advantage and it will not be a level playing field. It'll just make you shoot slower than what you are now. :P:lol: :lol: :lol:

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http://www.leverguns.com/articles/blancard/evans.htm

 

Very interesting. In looking at the rule book, the only thing I see that would possibly be against it is the calibre. I agree that using 44 mag would seem to let it in. I would not oppose it's use were I to be the MD where the question was raised. As for whether it is "competitive" I seriously doubt that anyone would chose this design to attempt to be more "competitive". Sometimes folks still do thing simply because they are fun.

How would you know if the hammer was down on an empty chamber? It has no exposed hammer.

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Not legal per SHD ver. 21.8 and every version previously. Should not even be a question:

 

RIFLE REQUIREMENTS

Rifles or carbines used in the main and team matches must be original or replicas of lever or slide action rifles manufactured during the period from approximately 1860 until 1899, incorporating a tubular magazine and exposed hammer. Rifles with box magazines may not be used. Certain shooting categories require a specific type of rifle and ammunition to be used. Please see the shooting categories for further information

Point out the exposed hammer.

evans1_small.jpg

 

evans_transition1_small.jpg

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To determine if the hammer was down on an empty chamber, you would "just" have to observe the ejection port as you cycle the lever. In the Old Model Evans you would cycle the lever each time you loaded a round, plus cycling until you saw the leading round come up just before it chambered. Since the Old Model held 32 rounds, if you loaded ten, you'd have to load, cycle, load, cycle ten times, then cycle the action 21 times more. A New Model Evams holds 28 rounds, so you'd load and lever for ten rounds, then work the lever ten more times and observe where the first round was on the carrier! A royal pain in the klarn, but interesting to shoot! Not sure about using .44 Mangle-em brass. Have to try it sometime... :wacko:

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I am certain this has been brought up to the ROC before... or if not, it was ruled on by the WB before there was a ROC. The Evans rifle is not legal as it doesn't meet the simple criteria of having an "exposed hammer".

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I recall several posts here in the wire about people using them at SASS matches. Various methods for loading have been discussed such as using dummy rounds to indicate that the next round is live, or something like that.

 

As far as legality goes, that's where the memory gets a little more fuzzy... I *seem* to recall it being said that it was okay. I absolutely do not remember anyone ever saying there was any objection to one being used on when pards showed up with one. More like a chorus of, "Can I try it?" type comments.

 

But the memory is fuzzy....

 

I might still like to have one. :)

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Rye,

 

Why would you want to shoot this rifle, it will be an unfair advantage and it will not be a level playing field. It'll just make you shoot slower than what you are now. :P:lol: :lol: :lol:

I wouldn't shoot it at a match, I wouldn't want to ruin my FAST times. Hey I even beat you on a stage here and there don't ya know???? Like when you mess up!!! :P:P I think it would be a cool gun to have, ya know, just to have!!! :lol:

Edited by Rye Miles #13621
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Rye Miles #13621, on 16 Dec 2016 - 8:28 PM, said:

I wouldn't shoot it at a match, I wouldn't want to ruin my FAST times. Hey I even beat you on a stage here and there don't ya know???? Like when you mess up!!! :P:P I think it would be a cool gun to have, ya know, just to have!!! :lol:

+1. It would be a cool gun to have. If you ever buy one, Ill even load a few rounds of black powder for you. BOOM/FIRE/SMOKE!!! :)

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I am certain this has been brought up to the ROC before... or if not, it was ruled on by the WB before there was a ROC. The Evans rifle is not legal as it doesn't meet the simple criteria of having an "exposed hammer".

The Evans does indeed have an external hammer. It is located under the action, just forward of the lever. See that thing that looks like the...ah, uh...equipment sack on a bull buffalo? ^_^ The hammer isn't as prominent, but it is there. It can be lowered manually, one-handed, if you are careful. Whether there is an empty chamber can be determined with the action open. Whether the Evans is the "optimum" CAS rifle or not is up to the individual handloader and shooter! ;)

Edited by Trailrider #896
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I shot with a guy at the Waldorf, MD club (Potomac Rangers) in the early 2000's who shot an Evans. He was having to have brass custom made at about $3 a pop until Starline started making .44 Super Mag. brass at 39 cents each as .44 Mag. did not work. He had a lot of really neat guns, pair of Colt Bluntlines, etc. Dressed like a RR Engineer and lived in VA. I believe he was a retired Marine. The Evans was really tricky to load and to show clear. Being around it was worth the hassle. At the time, there were a few available in the area for about $700.

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I shot with a guy at the Waldorf, MD club (Potomac Rangers) in the early 2000's who shot an Evans. He was having to have brass custom made at about $3 a pop until Starline started making .44 Super Mag. brass at 39 cents each as .44 Mag. did not work. He had a lot of really neat guns, pair of Colt Bluntlines, etc. Dressed like a RR Engineer and lived in VA. I believe he was a retired Marine. The Evans was really tricky to load and to show clear. Being around it was worth the hassle. At the time, there were a few available in the area for about $700.

That would have been "Windy Whales" wintered in NC summered up north, retired USMC air traffic control man.

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  • 3 weeks later...

hi guys I own 3 evans I can tell u anything you want to know about the rifles

yes there exposed hammer
.445 super mag brass is technically a pistol cal its slightly long .44 evans long was once called a 44-40 extra long
loading is tricky the brass has to be crimped and the optimal bullet is healed buffalo arms mould works for some but no all the chambers can be too tight for it
there is a trick to fast loading via the mag but you have to open the lever fully and bring it back about a 1/4 throw and then open it again




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Gotta wonder why the Winchester 1873 is called the 'gun that won the West!'

 

This Evans sounds like a gun that holds more rounds than the average ammo belt, but they are difficult to insert or shoot from the platform provided.

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well realistically the idea was that more ammo gave greater odds say if the military took it on 10 guys with tactics one shoots while the other reloads

Winchester did anything they could to bankrupt there competitors as well its possible the evans was too expensive but not sure

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