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Merwin Hulbert

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Just received:

 

The history of the Merwin Hulbert revolver debacle has been a roller coaster ride.

The idea of reintroducing the revolvers was hatched several years ago when A-Square of Wyoming was purchased by the Sharps Rifle Co.
More than 150 enthusiasts sent in deposits, and in some cases, complete payments, for revolvers which had not even been machined yet.
The company never did produce a working prototype. Six frames and some assorted parts were machined, but no barrels or cylinders.

Ultimately, Broadsword Group consummated a deal to assume the companies of Sharps Rifle Co., A-Square of Wyoming, Heiser Holsters and Spencer Rifle. The company is referred in general as SRC.
The first order of business was to reimburse every Merwin Hulbert customer their deposits. It totalled over $150,000.
And now, SRC is in the process of passing along the Merwin project to a company with a history of firearm reintroductions.
Sorry, I can't give you an update on who this might involve, or the progress.

The Merwin Hulbert revolvers were ahead of their time, and it's my hope, too, that these revolvers could get reintroduced. I know the demand is there.

I hope this answers your questions.

 

 

Sincerely,
Damon
SRC Customer Service Dept.

 

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NOT holding my breath-

This nonsense has been going on for many years.

How about any links that may support your comments?

THX,

OLG

Edited by The Original Lumpy Gritz

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I asked them about the Merwin Hulbert project a couple of days ago and this was the total of their e-mail response. Make of it what you will.

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,,,here's to wishing them the best... ...I will buy one when they hit the market...

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Maybe, hopefully, someday it will happen.

(this does seem to be one tough, not 100% dead horse)

 

There have been many other runs of specialty guns done in the past.

 

Examples: the modern 3 & 4 barreled shotguns, the "twin" 1911 with 2 barrels to name a couple.

percussion Colt Root revolver & rifle, the few Uberti 1873 Winchester .22 rifles & 1866 & 1873 Muskets, etc.

 

If/when it ever happens it would be nice if the parts interchanged with the originals; I think they could sell quit a few spare parts to fix originals that need springs, bolts, hands & other small parts.

 

If they make it to a shelf, I would like two.

 

But somehow I doubt they will be in time for next years list to Santa.

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I asked them about the Merwin Hulbert project a couple of days ago and this was the total of their e-mail response. Make of it what you will.

Well-here's some info to understand why so many here are as 'jaded', as we are.

http://www.sassnet.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=208106

 

IMO- We will never see any from this outfit.

OLG

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The Merwin Hulbert revolvers were ahead of their time, and it's my hope, too, that these revolvers could get reintroduced. I know the demand is there.

Howdy

 

I own three of them, and I can tell you from experience that they were not 'ahead of their time'. They were simply an alternative design for a cartridge revolver because S&W had all the patents sewn up for Top Breaks. Not so incredibly precise to machine either, as many seem to think.

 

My hat will be off to any company that can produce them, for they were a truly unique design. But I gotta tell ya, it is quicker to reload a Top Break than it is to reload a Merwin.

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Just watched the Forgotten Weapon episode on the Merwins. Looked to be a good design.

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Why bother to put something "out there" when there is no substantial evidence of anyone doing anything about reintroducing the MH. SO: if there is actually no information available on "who" might be doing something, nor what they (unknown) might be doing, then the reality is ...... TA DA. Horse Feathers.

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Howdy

 

I own three of them, and I can tell you from experience that they were not 'ahead of their time'. They were simply an alternative design for a cartridge revolver because S&W had all the patents sewn up for Top Breaks. Not so incredibly precise to machine either, as many seem to think.

 

My hat will be off to any company that can produce them, for they were a truly unique design. But I gotta tell ya, it is quicker to reload a Top Break than it is to reload a Merwin.

 

A few years ago I was able to get a hold of an original in 44.40 for an affordable price, for what they are, with found money I had.......turns out it had mismatching numbers (whatever, I don't care), and from what I've read, this is most likely assembled in the 1890s from parts left overs (again I don't care)..........

 

That being said, comparing it to the Colt Peacemaker, and the S&W Schofield, it does seem over engineered for what it is, and it's time. On the surface, Colt seems minimalisc in design, S&W has more bulk, but a quick top break to dump spent shells, and the MH has sliding loading gates, frame twisting for dumping spent shells, all kinds of nook and crannies for fouling to get into......ugh.

 

Unique design? Hells yeah! .....but seemingly over engineered.

 

I'm not a firearm historian specialist, but how it all seems to me.

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I'd buy one.

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Howdy

 

I own three of them, and I can tell you from experience that they were not 'ahead of their time'. They were simply an alternative design for a cartridge revolver because S&W had all the patents sewn up for Top Breaks. Not so incredibly precise to machine either, as many seem to think.

 

My hat will be off to any company that can produce them, for they were a truly unique design. But I gotta tell ya, it is quicker to reload a Top Break than it is to reload a Merwin.

 

 

I have two M&H revolvers, a pocket, spur trigger model in .38 S&W and a full size in .44-40. Both are neat old guns that are fun to shoot. As Driftwood as said it is quicker to reload a Top Break than a Merwin, but the Merwin IS quicker than a Colt. To an extent. Driftwood will also tell you that it is is very easy for some shooters (me) to forget about the Merwin's really nifty unloading trick, but I'll let him tell you about that. (Assuming he remembers)

 

An interesting thing about the Merwin is that the action is identical to the S&W New Model 3, to the point where parts are interchangeable. This has been confirmed to me by more than one gunsmith as well as the evidence of my own eyes. I seem to recall another gun that used the same innards, but can't remember what it was. So, while the ejection method was unique and interesting to look at, the rest of the design was pretty standard for its day.

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I'd buy one, but I note that USFA went under while marketing arguably the most successful pistol design ever created -- the Colt Model P Single Action Army. Now, there are a host of reasons that USFA was mismanaged, but if you can't make a go on the SAA, how likely is it that someone can make a go of M&H -- an obscure design only suited for this sport, and minimally at that. Sure, you might be able to sell a few thousand to collectors. I'd love to have one, but I simply can't see a company staying in business making them. M&H didn't.

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I agree Oddnews. A company relying on the MH as it's sole product won't last. It would have to be part of line-up of other products.

A company such as Uberti being an obvious choice.

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Years ago someone like Taylor or maybe Navy Arms sent several originals to an Italian gun company but nothing ever came of it.

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Decades ago, I paid in advance for a .44 Magnum Automag. Totally screwed. I'll never pay in advance for a "Brilliant Idea" until I can hold it and dry fire it. :wub:

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