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Eyesa Horg

.38 case gauge, Quick ?

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Was just getting ready to order an L.E. Wilson from Midway along with other things. All our guns are 38/357. Sooo, would the 357 gage be the better way to go. Figure if a 38 fits in it, it should be good in the gun. And if for any reason I load some 357's I'll already have a gage!

 

EH

Edited by Eyesa Horg

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My Dillon case gauge is specifically for .38 Special. I have a separate one for .357 Mag.

 

Interesting question, but I feel more secure gauging the specific caliber.

 

But I could be wrong. I am interested in the other answers you will get.

Edited by J-BAR #18287

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One of the things the Wilson case gauge checks in max OAL. That will, of course, not work with the shorter .38s. This should not be a big deal since pretty miuch everyone that handloads has a caliper to check OAL.

 

P.S. I have at least ten case gauges. Seldom use them anymore. I use the cylinder from my revolvers. That way you can gauge six at at time. Initially, just make sure the ammo that works in your revolvers works in your rifle. Once you have done that if the ammo goes in your revolvers it will go in your rifle.

Edited by Larsen E. Pettifogger, SASS #32933

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If you are actually looking for a loaded cartridge gauge, these work well,

 

http://www.egwguns.com/chamber-checkers/

 

Multi caliber & multi-hole same caliber.

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One of the things the Wilson case gauge checks in max OAL. That will, of course, not work with the shorter .38s. This should not be a big deal since pretty miuch everyone that handloads has a caliper to check OAL.

That was my thought, and if it fits in a 357 gage, it should fit in the guns, correct.?

 

I have no current desire to load 357, but the rifle is new to us & who knows in real life it might not like 38's. It cycles dummy rounds well, but haven't shot it yet.

Edited by Eyesa Horg

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If you are actually looking for a loaded cartridge gauge, these work well,

 

http://www.egwguns.com/chamber-checkers/

 

Multi caliber & multi-hole same caliber.

 

 

Thank you--- Actually I was going to get one from Dillon next time I talked to 'em; But needed to add to my Midway order to save shipping costs!

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One of the things the Wilson case gauge checks in max OAL. That will, of course, not work with the shorter .38s. This should not be a big deal since pretty miuch everyone that handloads has a caliper to check OAL.

 

P.S. I have at least ten case gauges. Seldom use them anymore. I use the cylinder from my revolvers. That way you can gauge six at at time. Initially, just make sure the ammo that works in your revolvers works in your rifle. Once you have done that if the ammo goes in your revolvers it will go in your rifle.

Couple of things, I always gage match ammo - Reasons, length not a consideration in pistol but important to me in rifle. Diameter - too big around will not chamber. Primers - gaging gives me an opportunity to check for high primers. I don't use my pistol chambers because some thing that will work in the Rugers don't always work in the 73's. Of course everyones mileage will vary I'm a lead foot so my match ammo is as close to perfect as I can make it. Practice ammo not, don't have enough time for that.

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One of the things the Wilson case gauge checks in max OAL. That will, of course, not work with the shorter .38s. This should not be a big deal since pretty miuch everyone that handloads has a caliper to check OAL.

 

P.S. I have at least ten case gauges. Seldom use them anymore. I use the cylinder from my revolvers. That way you can gauge six at at time. Initially, just make sure the ammo that works in your revolvers works in your rifle. Once you have done that if the ammo goes in your revolvers it will go in your rifle.

I use the cylinder too and my Bond barrels in 45 acp for my 1911 ammo.

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Like I said in my post, make sure your pistol ammo will work in your rifle. IF it does then using your revolver cylinder will save a lot of time. I have ammo that will drop into the gauges but will NOT work in some of my guns. For example, I have several .44-40s. Ammo that drops into the gauge will not chamber in several of my guns. What I use for a case gauge is an old Colt cylinder I bought off EBay. The chambers are to original spec .44-40 ammo. If the rounds freely drop into the cylinder and fall out when I turn it over it works in all my guns. I even have a special gauge that just measures .38 Special rim diameter as I was having trouble with some rounds not feeding properly. Finally tossed out everything except Starline and Wichester brass for my match ammo and solved that problem.

 

Couple of things, I always gage match ammo - Reasons, length not a consideration in pistol but important to me in rifle. Diameter - too big around will not chamber. Primers - gaging gives me an opportunity to check for high primers. I don't use my pistol chambers because some thing that will work in the Rugers don't always work in the 73's. Of course everyones mileage will vary I'm a lead foot so my match ammo is as close to perfect as I can make it. Practice ammo not, don't have enough time for that.

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If you are actually looking for a loaded cartridge gauge, these work well,

 

http://www.egwguns.com/chamber-checkers/

 

Multi caliber & multi-hole same caliber.

They also have a 7-hole .357 gauge.

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Checking with the revolver cylinder wins for me. $20 less expensive also. Thanks guys. Feel free to keep posting for other Pards benefit.

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I"ve never felt the need to own a gauge for .38's or .357.

 

why?

 

 

All my bullets I shoot are cast ,with a crimp groove. And all my . 38's are shot in .357 Blackhawks.Just never seen the need. You may not either, depending on your circumstances.

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Finally tossed out everything except Starline and Wichester brass for my match ammo and solved that problem.

------------------------------------------------------------------

I'm with you on this one Larsen. I shoot only one brass "Winchester" in my rifles. Not all 38spl brass are created equal!

Regards,

Ringer

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My Beretta Renegade 357 has a smaller chamber than any other rifle I have had.My son made me a case gage for it.If the round works in that case gage they work in any of my guns.If they won't work in that case gage I check them in my 38 case gage and mark them pistols only.

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Holy Crap! $99 for a 45 gauge. I just use a caliper...or the chambers in my revolvers.

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Larson, however poorly I said it everyone circumstance is different having a tool that will tell you if a loaded round is to your specifications is for me a money in the bank. Some here may not shoot a lot of out of town matches but the wife and I do. Often traveling to four, five sometimes six matches in a row having a couple of thousand rounds that don't work in one weapon or another doesn't do much for my disposition. As I shoot 38sp in matches I have several gages for 38sp as well several 12ga gages. Also 45acp, 38super, 40s&w. So in my little pea brain gages are cheap insurance against one of the things that can ruin an other wise stellar performance.

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Larson, however poorly I said it everyone circumstance is different having a tool that will tell you if a loaded round is to your specifications is for me a money in the bank. Some here may not shoot a lot of out of town matches but the wife and I do. Often traveling to four, five sometimes six matches in a row having a couple of thousand rounds that don't work in one weapon or another doesn't do much for my disposition. As I shoot 38sp in matches I have several gages for 38sp as well several 12ga gages. Also 45acp, 38super, 40s&w. So in my little pea brain gages are cheap insurance against one of the things that can ruin an other wise stellar performance.

 

Agree. The chamber gauge use also offers a good time for a visual on rifle rounds to check for sign of split.

I often use a different color bullet in rifle to designate that those rounds have been checked. This is especially true for Sassy's rounds. I want to eliminate the chance of carrier jam for her as best I can. For my BP rounds that I have chamber gauged, I often mark primer with red magic marker giving myself notice that rounds have passed my inspection.

 

Besides the vizual, if a gauge is not available and a safe place allows I have even taken time to cycle rifle rounds and drop revolver rounds in cylinders. Time spend to cut chance of match ammo problems is well worth it......especially for spouse's ammo. Ride home can be more pleasant.

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+100 for the spouses rounds and equipment

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Said it before, and I'll repeat it one more time. If you FINAL crimp with a Redding Profile Crimp die, you can throw those case gauges away. I have never seen the reloaded round that wouldn't chamber in ANY gun, after being run through that die. Speaking strictly of straight sided pistol cases here. OAL is set with a caliper, and the seating die adjusted accordingly.

 

RBK

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Actually I do load with a Redding, a good piece of equipment but like any piece of equipment doesn't always under all conditions do a perfect job. Or it can be asked to do a job that it wasn't designed to do, so I'll add a little redundancy to my match ammo and use a gage as well.

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I"ve never felt the need to own a gauge for .38's or .357.

 

why?

 

 

All my bullets I shoot are cast ,with a crimp groove. And all my . 38's are shot in .357 Blackhawks.Just never seen the need. You may not either, depending on your circumstances.

 

I felt the same way plus stuff like this is hard to find up here in Canada, then 5 years ago at I was shooting Fire & Ice at Cowtown and had two slightly oversized rounds hang up in my 73. At least 5 shooters on our posse suggested that I get a cartridge checker so on Monday a friend going to Dillon picked me up one in 38 special. Now the final step in my loading routine is checking the rounds before I package them, It also picks up the odd split case that slips through on my Dillon. I don't find many maybe 1 or 2 per thousand if that many but I never have trouble any longer. I generally load 5 or 6 thousand then do the checking and packaging while I'm watching TV. Any that don't work are set aside for resizing then once a year I will pull and resize all of the rounds. That way I salvage the components.

Grey Beard

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Using a cylinder or barrel (in the case of an auto-loader), is fine for the person who has one or two guns and finds the one with the smaller dimension... but when you start 8 or 9 different guns, all chambered alike... or know that sooner or later another party will "borrow" some ammo, or you'll acquire another gun in that chambering... a case gauge is the ONLY way to go.

 

Every once in great while I produce a cartridge that won't fit in the case gauge... The only one I don't bother case checking is my C45S!

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