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Cheyenne Culpepper 32827

Shooting and the loss of hearing

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A previous thread dwelt on hearing loss from shooting,

 

I had made the statement, "it is hard to argue with ignorance". That was pertaining to hearling loss, not the rules of SASS.

 

First, the meaning of Ignorance,,, lack of knowledge,,,,, NOT lack of intelligence.

 

.http://www.asha.org/public/hearing/Recreational-Firearm-Noise-Exposure/

 

an excellent read on the issues of hearing loss

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Bottom line, Shooter is still on the clock.

 

Gasoline powered lawn tools, race cars, loud music, unmuffled cars/trucks, big electric motors, general construction settings, all produce damaging sounds.

 

If one has to raise their voice to be heard at a normal conversation distance, then it is too loud

 

Hearing loss is an accumulation and starts at birth.

 

I'll tap your shoulder at the beep.

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It's a good read till the end. At the end they suggest choosing single shots over lever and pump guns.

That's a little off. And a bit political I think.

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Interesting the timimg of this thread. after 40 yrs heavy diesel repair and 35+yrs competitive shooting, was awarded my first set of hearing aids at the cost of $5200. Could have bought quite a cowboy arsenal for that!! GW

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I have hearing loss - hearing aids for last 5 years and I am 57. My loss has absolutely zero to do with shooting, the audiologist is actual surprised when I tell them I am a frequent shooter. I was told just genetics and bad luck was the cause. If your Dr is any good they can tell the difference.

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I'm almost 75 and have been shooting for 65+ years. When I first started shooting there was no hearing protection. Basically it just wasn't done. I was a drag racer too, back in the 60's....no hearing protection used. You really had to look hard to find anything for hearing protection in any gunshops, sporting goods stores or any store for that matter. In the late 70's/early 80's, hearing protection started to be used in shooting sports. In our manufacturing plants workers started wearing it too. When I was in the army in the early 60's, no hearing protection when at the range.

 

I too have hearing loss and wear hearing aids. I sure am a lot smarter now.

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Interesting the timimg of this thread. after 40 yrs heavy diesel repair and 35+yrs competitive shooting, was awarded my first set of hearing aids at the cost of $5200. Could have bought quite a cowboy arsenal for that!! GW

Whatever you do. Do not put them on your nightstand beside the bed. I have seen two pair that dogs have chewed. One of the pairs went through the dog before being found. Kind of an expensive treat for old fido.

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Whatever you do. Do not put them on your nightstand beside the bed. I have seen two pair that dogs have chewed. One of the pairs went through the dog before being found. Kind of an expensive treat for old fido.

Wash it off in a little hand sanitizer. It'll be good as new. ;)

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Shanley said I might want to look into hearing aids...guess I should.

But, does he not realize I can 'control' them....selective hearing!!!! Ha!!!!

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Guess I'll join the ignorant group. Got my hearing loss due to a bad day at the office with a M-60 machine gun in a country far far away.

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What lose I have is mostly from work - high speed printers in the 70's. We figured they were bad for our hearing, but back then, we could not get anyone to listen (no pun intended.)

 

The biggest risk for civilians shooting is at indoor ranges. I always use double protection when I go to one - and try not too. Both ear plugs and muffs.

 

When I used to go a lot, seems that someone with a hot 45 always wanted to shoot beside me! I would normally ask to move away from them. So I kept a 44 Mag in my bag to shoot off quickly just before I left.:D

 

Some cowboys lover their full load 45's, but I prefer not to time them to keep what hearing I have left.

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I'm almost 75 and have been shooting for 65+ years. When I first started shooting there was no hearing protection. Basically it just wasn't done. I was a drag racer too, back in the 60's....no hearing protection used. You really had to look hard to find anything for hearing protection in any gunshops, sporting goods stores or any store for that matter. In the late 70's/early 80's, hearing protection started to be used in shooting sports. In our manufacturing plants workers started wearing it too. When I was in the army in the early 60's, no hearing protection when at the range.

 

I too have hearing loss and wear hearing aids. I sure am a lot smarter now.

 

I spent basic at Fort Jackson in February '61. M1's were all we had then and I was losing some hearing even before I went in. I bitched to the Top while on break one day about the noise from the rifles. He handed two Viceroy's from his pack and said..."Tear the filters off and stick 'em in your holes, candyass, and quit buggin' me!". Worked wonders!

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We used M14's and that's about the same answer I got :wacko:

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My dad told me they used cotton balls when he was in. Seems like the viceroy filters woulda been better. I've had tinnitus at least since my early 30's. I always blamed it on not using hearing protection when hunting, but it's impossible to know what exact thing messed me up. All I know is that when I teach my nephews to hunt, we go into the field with ear muffs. I even sprung for some of those electronic muffs because they were worried about not being able to hear the deer sneak up on them.

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i'm 54 i put hearing loss down to our age when cars had no air con, so every one had windows down. all the wind force and crap blowing in our ears over time.

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I have hearing loss - hearing aids for last 5 years and I am 57. My loss has absolutely zero to do with shooting, the audiologist is actual surprised when I tell them I am a frequent shooter. I was told just genetics and bad luck was the cause. If your Dr is any good they can tell the difference.

Mine to just faded away over about 30 yrs. At age 59 had cochlear implant put in and another at 61. And they're great....

 

Interesting the timimg of this thread. after 40 yrs heavy diesel repair and 35+yrs competitive shooting, was awarded my first set of hearing aids at the cost of $5200. Could have bought quite a cowboy arsenal for that!! GW

How about $80k an ear.........how many toys could we buy for that.....lol.....Faygo(that doesn't need to be tapped anymore)Kid

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when I shot Hi power at camp perry, they suggested plugs and ear muffs,,, the muffs help protect vibrations on the skull from damaging hearing also...

 

for hunting now, I use muffs with a microphone,,,, keeps my ears warm too!!

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Got my first set of hearing aids this year. I decided I had to do something when in October I would question my guide friend if he heard anything (referring to bulls bugling) and he answered that they had been bugling since we had got to particular area. Seemed I had been missing the call of a many a bull for a day or two of hunting. Now not hearing wife or TV is one thing.....but the sounds in the wild such as the bugling bull elk is really serious. ha. I have enjoyed serious shooting since returning from college in '68, then shot IHMSA for 22 years prior to CAS so have wore hearing protection for a long time, I think "father time" just catches up with most of us....and agreeing with others on loud noises of our early generation.

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Perhaps my hearing loss is due in part to shooting (since 1960 or so), but I do think my tinnitus is from that cause, I know others with tinnitus from gunfire.

 

When I was on the Army ranges in the 60's, there was no ear protection for anyone but Artillery personnel. your own rifle doesn't seem as loud to your ear as the guys lying on either side, an M! Garand is LOUD when it's only 2 feet away.

 

Yes, indoor ranges are much harder on the ears. I make sure I take my hearing aids out before shooting...........

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Mine is going bad, here is why.

 

Blew up a bicycle tire when I was airing it up with the air compressor ( 1975)

Sitting by the speakers at the school dances (1976-1980)

High power speakers in my car for Rock music (1978 till ??)

Rock Concerts (1980 till ???)

Shooting trap in the back yard (1974 till 1984)

Hunting (1972 to ????)

Target shooting (1967 to forever)

Working in factories (1990 till ???)

I have had ringing in my ears since I blew the tire up in 1975 and have been turning things up so I can hear them ever since.

 

The hearing test truck is here at the plant today. The last time it was here I told them I don't hear well and have ringing in my ears.

They made me take the test 3 times before they believed me.

I have not reached the point of need hearing aids, but my time is coming.

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the noise of WB matches is enough for me to not really want to shoot the discipline,, especially under cover... and I have good custom earplugs

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Y'all type a little louder please......... :huh:

 

:P

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Huh?

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WHUT???????

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I'm 69 and I still tune pianos by ear! I have lost some high end and real low end hearing from age but not enough to prevent me from tuning in those ranges, it's just a little harder. I'm glad to say that I'm blessed with good hearing and good eyesight. (I only wear reading glasses for reading) I used to play drums in a band and have a slight amount of tinnitus but it's not bad enough to bother me. I wear molded ear plugs for shooting and they help a lot! ;)

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Allot of people out there don't understand just how damaging gun shooting can be to your hearing. Interesting side note, more damage can occur from the bang of a gun next to you than yours.

 

It's all about the sound cone. You are exposed to more sound from the side than behind.

 

Honestly, if people don't care about thier hearing than they can just go without.. They will pay for thier own ignorance.

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Don't forget the big two age and the military

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8" howitzers will get you every time.

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It costs a reported $2000 but soon available as military surplus:-)

 

Army deploys high-tech earbuds to protect soldiers' hearing

The headset, called TCAPS - tactical communication and protective system - can deaden loud noises and also enhance ambient sound for better situational awareness

 

As for now try Walker's Game Year but my experience suggests they take awhile to adjust to. Wear them around the house and your wife will notice how low the TV volume is set to.

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Yes, indoor ranges are much harder on the ears. I make sure I take my hearing aids out before shooting...........

 

One time when I took my mom shooting, she refused the earplugs saying she'd just turn off her hearing aids. After 1 shot downrange i felt a tap on my shoulder, it seems she wasn't nearly as deaf as she thought she was, and wanted to stay that way.

 

She reported that it wasn't loud but physically hurt her ear. So now I can't tell if turning off your hearing aids actually helps.

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Me again. Before getting hearing aids last week, I have been using one walker game ear (higher end model) plugged into surefire ear plugs.. Really helped hearing range instructions and the beeper. Wasn't perfect but worked good enough to make me happy. You can hear them turn on and off between strings and an occasional high pitched ring off of some targets, but hearing the TO was good GW

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