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Death Penalty for Bomber


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He should be marched out back and have a bullet placed in his head this afternoon

too easy!!!!!! his gut!!

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I don't care where the bullet is placed as long as it is fatal. I'd just as soon see a 12ga pressed against his forehead.

 

worthless pile of dung (and I owe dung an apology). Couldn't happen fast enough for my taste. At least the older brother is feeding worms.

 

wow, better go fishing. Getting worked up about this.

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He should be marched out back and have a bullet placed in his head this afternoon

 

On the other hand, spending years in SuperMax, waiting for the appeals to run their course, never knowing when death may descend, may more closely approximate a fair measure of initial retribution.

 

The parents of Martin Richard, the youngster killed as he unknowingly stood in front of the bomb, had asked the jury not to impose the death penalty. Imagine the self-control and rectitude it must take to ask for mercy for the man who killed your child.

 

I am glad that I was not on the jury.

 

LL

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The parents of Martin Richard, the youngster killed as he unknowingly stood in front of the bomb, had asked the jury not to impose the death penalty. Imagine the self-control and rectitude it must take to ask for mercy for the man who killed your child.

 

My beliefs teach forgiveness of others. I don't know that I could live up to their example.

 

As for Tsarnaev... Sucks to be him.

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Posted · Hidden by Allie Mo, SASS No. 25217, May 15, 2015 - insult
Hidden by Allie Mo, SASS No. 25217, May 15, 2015 - insult

Probably shouldn't be to hard on the guy in this thread or it will get shut down. One or two folks have very thin skins and will start whining about it.

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Forgiveness does not necessarily relieve one of the consequences of their actions.

 

There will be a mandatory appeal just for starters.

 

I suspect if he's ever in general population he won't last long.

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Forgiveness does not necessarily relieve one of the consequences of their actions.

 

You speak wisdom.

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Simple fact is that years on death row and multiple appeals are much more expensive to taxpayers than life imprisonment.

Something wrong with that system if you ask me. If I recall right, the average timespan between sentence and execution is a around 12 years, some are much longer.

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Couldn't happen to a more worthy person.

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Be interesting to see if he is executed with the same vigor and expediency that Timothy McVay was.

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Simple fact is that years on death row and multiple appeals are much more expensive to taxpayers than life imprisonment.

Something wrong with that system if you ask me. If I recall right, the average timespan between sentence and execution is a around 12 years, some are much longer.

 

It was reported that the defendant was willing to take a life sentance and waive all appeals if the Feds would take the death penalty off the table; Feds refused.

 

My sense is that someone decided that we needed to make a statement.

 

LL

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think we should give him his own pressure cooker with a random delay fuse. then let him carry it around till it decides to detonate. but like Charlie says he will probably outlive a lot of us GW

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Didn't McVeigh waive all appeals and request a speedy execution?

 

LL

Yes, but I believe that there were still pleas made on his behalf. IMHO,there is no difference between the two evil b&$%£DS and it would be nice if this execution moved as fast as the last one, but that ain't going to happen.

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He'll still be in his cell watching TV 20 years from now.

 

I hope he enjoys tele-ministers and Seseme Street....re the Supermax facility in CO where he is likely to go:

 

"The majority of the facility is above ground. The only part that is underground is a subterranean corridor that links cellblocks to the lobby. Inmates spend 23 hours a day locked in their cells and are escorted by a minimum of three officers for their five hours of private recreation per week.[16] Each cell has a desk, a stool, and a bed, which are almost entirely made out of poured concrete, as well as a toilet that shuts off if blocked, a shower that runs on a timer to prevent flooding, and a sink lacking a potentially dangerous tap. Rooms may also be fitted with polished steel mirrors bolted to the wall, an electric light, a radio, and a black and white television that shows recreational, educational, and religious programming.[17]"

 

LL

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think we should give him his own pressure cooker with a random delay fuse. then let him carry it around till it decides to detonate. but like Charlie says he will probably outlive a lot of us GW

 

Det cord around the outer extremities works for me.............then (after recovery) the court decided penalty.

 

I sure hope that it doesn't take 20 years for them to carry it out but it probably will..............so since I'll probably be dead, I'll say now.........Goodbye you POS.

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YES!! :D

Around 10-15 years from now, he'll get real scared and scarier each day knowen what's coming for him. Not physical pain, but a very slow death. Wish they would let the whole world see the excution.

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I was a forensic psychiatric social worker, working w guilty but not guilty by insanity (criminally insane, murder, arson, bank robbery) and Mentally Disordered Sex Offenders MDSOs that were still in the system (rape, child molest).

 

I certainty became aware if the Innocense Project http://www.innocenceproject.org/causes-wrongful-convictionthat uses DNA to proove cases innocent.

 

Most cases do not rely on DNA, but of the few hundred they've worked with---when DNA was able to prove that someone really was innocent----it then becomes easy to autopsy the case and see what went wrong:

 

72% eyewitness mis-ID---worst form of "evidence" there is

47% bad forensics

27% false confessions

15% bad informants

 

My exper with them suggests some 10-20% of convictions are innocent. I helped done get off, and in one case, I knew if a forensic psychologist who was railroading someone. The judge got wind if it, and I wish the bad psychologist had spent time in jail.

 

I AM NOT SAYING THIS DUDE of the OP IS INNOCENT. I am, however, lending support to my view of being in favor of re-learning, though I believe we are NOT good at that yet, that where passion is involved, there can be no justice (only retribution), and in being against the death penalty.

 

Speaking of our society, not this case, sometimes innocent are convicted, and as well, my belief is that if society would rather not teach violence of this perp's kind, then it is counterproductive to display violence. I believe that the death penalty is not a deterrent at the moment of the crime, and that some perp's actually commit to get the death penalty.

 

I know there is disagreement. But my virw is such.

 

I am pleased when I see forgiveness to relieve the heart, but I do not think that means no consequence---just that a just consequence would not be violence. (please don't harang me about self defense, protecting others, home intrusions and war. I'm nit talking about those. I'm talking about a man who can no longer kill, and the difference between justice and retribution.)

 

Ideally, it's important there be nonmore violence from him and that he must become someone who would not do violence, punishment.

 

So I do not preach forgiveness, per se; I preach re-learning. To me, if someone has wronged, it us important to learn that he is at some point changed.

 

I know our forensic psychotherapeutic/conditioning system is not there yet.

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Death Row should be a hallway from the courtroom to the execution chamber of choice. In fact there should be kind of a Monte Hall version where you get to pick Door #1, Door #2, and Door #3…none leading to freedom of course.

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Sorry Jen,

 

In this case and many others........I say BS. This kind of "re-learning" stuff is nonsense when it comes to REAL CRIMINALS.

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I don't know why we still have a death penalty. It takes so long to carry out, that by the time it is, everyone has forgotten about the crime, so what's the point? Missouri just executed a man this past March who was convicted in 1996.

 

This marathon bomber POS will outlive most of us. I say let him rot in solitary while the appeals run their course.

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Didn't McVeigh waive all appeals and request a speedy execution?

 

LL

Yes. He took the easy way out.

 

http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/federal-executions-1927-2003

 

there have been 37 federal executions since 1927. Does not count the 7 POWs executed Aug 25, 1945.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Penitentiary,_Terre_Haute

 

there are 58 on death row in Terre Haute. They are not all serving a death sentence (Why waste a good cell block?)

 

With a death sentence he will remain in the news.

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Just make sure he knows he's going to be buried in a pig skin when ever he finally gets executed or dies.

No trip to paradise might just give him something to think about.

Willy B'

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The $$$$$$$$$ spent keeping a convicted criminal on death row for decades would be better spent on assisting 'good' people that may have fallen on harder times live a better life. Thinking of the elderly on fixed incomes, the hospices people, the cancer patients, the VFW folks, the MOM;s like the one in the Boston Protest that disciplined her misguided boy child, the people that can not afford heat in the winter, and so forth.

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Right now, I support the firing squad that the North Koreans are using, a battery of AA guns. I was at first bothered by the use of such firepower, but upon further thought, I thought it was fast and actually more humane compared to a squad of fairly good shots with smaller calibers and possible misses. Sooner would better though.

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Somehow I do not believe this heinous crime against humanity, against children, will be forgotten in 20 years. I think the anger from it today will still be there in 20 years.

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Somehow I do not believe this heinous crime against humanity, against children, will be forgotten in 20 years. I think the anger from it today will still be there in 20 years.

Maybe some will still be angry, but in twenty years many of us will be gone, and there will be a whole new generation who weren't alive or old enough to remember what happened. Sirhan Sirhan is still alive, but he's either unknown or mostly forgotten now.

 

A sentence is meant to bring justice and closure to a crime. Carrying out a sentence 20 years after the fact IMO is a useless and expensive exercise.

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