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Spotters, what do you need to see in order to call a miss.


Kirk James

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Congrats on your first shoot .I ask, are you saying that at your first shoot you already knew the rulebook and the entire job of a spotter?

It sounds like he's got the spotting aspect down pretty good. How much have you spotted in a SASS match?

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The topic concerned the way we spot. Look at the target for a hit or a miss in the background, or both. I would like to know how others that have had success spotting study the stages. The video shown was an excellent example of what to look for and would be great as one in a series of training tapes. Would these interest you?

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The topic concerned the way we spot. Look at the target for a hit or a miss in the background, or both. I would like to know how others that have had success spotting study the stages. The video shown was an excellent example of what to look for and would be great as one in a series of training tapes. Would these interest you?

Grzzly Dave's video was good, and shows the perspective from the shooters position and view. Spotters would have the save view if they were standing on Grizz's head. Now, step several steps to the left or right of the shooter and you get another perspective. Spotters views is now at an angle and quite possible some of the targets, or background is obstructed by props, TO/Shooters bodies, or other targets. Spotters need to be aware of 'dead' sounding steel, shooters pling-pling ammo, speed of shooters and which direction they start their engagement. For example, shooter is a fast shooter, shoots pling-pling loads, 2nd or 3rd target has faint/no ding sound, the best position you can find (even if you move) has some visual obstructions and/or you can not view the complete down range for dirt splatter from an edger. Oh ya, shooting order and direction is shooters choice, thus random. So, you see no splatter, you see no movement of the target, you hear faint first ding, but not the second ding (edger),,, then all you have to go my is your gut feeling. You hold up your count, the other two spotters do the same and there is a difference. All you can say is each did the best they could and it wasn't poor spotting. Or you could just freely give out Merry Christmas BOD; to everyone, when your gut feeling was that it was a miss.

 

Now, how many spotters are deaf or have severe hearing loss and wearing ear plugs to boot?

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Congrats on your first shoot .I ask, are you saying that at your first shoot you already knew the rulebook and the entire job of a spotter?

 

Of course not. And that's my point ... you don't need to be a walking rulebook with complete knowledge of the game to be a spotter. At least not at a local match.

 

Just jump in, do your best, have a good attitude, and learn as much as you can.

 

Being so dang over-focused on the almighty rulebook turns good people into fun sponges.

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The topic concerned the way we spot. Look at the target for a hit or a miss in the background, or both. I would like to know how others that have had success spotting study the stages. The video shown was an excellent example of what to look for and would be great as one in a series of training tapes. Would these interest you?

Very interested. I'm always interested in something to add to the RO classes. Yes, they are already long enough, but good interesting material is worth it.

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Of course not. And that's my point ... you don't need to be a walking rulebook with complete knowledge of the game to be a spotter. At least not at a local match.

 

Just jump in, do your best, have a good attitude, and learn as much as you can.

 

Being so dang over-focused on the almighty rulebook turns good people into fun sponges.

I would suggest you read the RO1 handbook on the spotters responsibility and then rethink your statement

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It sounds like he's got the spotting aspect down pretty good. How much have you spotted in a SASS match?

I also suggest you reread the spotters responsibility in the RO1 handbook .your statement shows a need to refresh your memory. Phantom is the only poster that knows what the responsibilities are .

 

as Phantom would say "CHEERS"

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I do the best that I can. I pay attention and give the benifit of the doubt. It's the best I can do and I promise to do it for all.

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For me the worst stages to spot on are the oddly shaped targets, like the cowboy shaped targets, my least favorite.

 

With so many small edges it can make picking out an edger a real challenge. Squares, circles and the playing card suite targets are easy compared to the cowboy, buffalo and other intricately shaped targets.

 

They're cool to look at but can be a real pain for a spotter.

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I love spotting and take it as a serious task. I keep my fingers hidden until the shooter is done and never look at the other spotters. It does get a whole lot easier when the shooter says out load during a string oh S#*t, most times I can be sure that indicated a miss.... but not always.

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I also suggest you reread the spotters responsibility in the RO1 handbook .your statement shows a need to refresh your memory. Phantom is the only poster that knows what the responsibilities are .

 

as Phantom would say "CHEERS"

I suggest you become a member and come out and show us how you do things since you seem to think we're all doing such a bad job. Be sure and introduce yourself. Put your money where your mouth is. Cheers.
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Yul, don't fall for this "Guest" thing.

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I shoot .36 percussion revolvers as main match guns....Many times misses are called when I know damn well I hit the target...but it ain't worth arguing over...it's just one of the little foibles

of "the game"...I'm having fun anyway.

 

I'll never be in the position where one called miss that was actually a hit will affect my

placing in a match anyway, so I just suck up the bad calls and let it go....

 

Bp

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I love spotting and take it as a serious task. I keep my fingers hidden until the shooter is done and never look at the other spotters. It does get a whole lot easier when the shooter says out load during a string oh S#*t, most times I can be sure that indicated a miss.... but not always.

When I say it, it means a P. I can't ever tell if I missed on account of how I close both eyes when I shoot.

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Some spotters I have seen need a white cane and a hearing aid...

 

I saw that guy in a movie one time. Turned out to be a Kung Fu master that could deflect bullets with his metal staff... :lol:

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Being DEAF, let me share my thoughts.

 

I would rather have a spotter who is deaf and yet pays FULL attention to watching the targets than to have someone who can hear well and pays little attention to watching the targets but rather relies on their hearing to determine a hit or miss.

 

In this game, the truth is that we don't have perfect spotters. I have been sure that I hit a target with ALL the spotters ruled a miss. How in the world could they have not seen that hit? hmmmmmmm

 

AND, I've seen my own misses, clearly kick up dirt and rocks behind a pistol target, and ALL 3 spotters called me CLEAN. I laughed and ask the TO...."you gotta me kidding me. Didn't they see that miss". The TO just smiled and stated.... 'obviously not'.

 

 

..........Widder

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