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Cheyenne Culpepper 32827

Safety in our sport, where are we?

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In light of the accident that recently happened, maybe it's time to step back and look at where we are considering safety.

 

 

Does you club have a safety plan, the one that is taught in Range Administration and Range design, if we take time to teach it or read it?

 

Does you club have signs like the one at Stoney Bottom? Do you know the correct number to call for an emergency,,?

 

Do you have emergency supplies on hand, (I used to carry a trauma kit all the time, I need to start carrying it again. I know that Firelands, a club near Stoney Bottom has them as several other clubs in OH. Pretty sure that Stoney Bottom has one or more.

 

Do you know who is most qualified to respond in your club?

 

 

Can a response team get to the range?

 

 

Do you know any of the answers to these questions, or do you let someone else take care of YOUR safety?

 

Do you even care?

 

 

CPBC

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All very good comments, CC!

 

I was spoofed a couple years ago when I mentioned I carried a First Aid Kit in my cart, but I've used enough band-aids for me to justify carrying the kit. Some felt it was a bit sissified. Lead splatters, burns, splinters plus headaches and eye washes are the frequent uses, not just for me, but others too. However, that kit will be just the minimum for a more serious injury.

 

As far as the most qualified to respond in your club, I'd amend that to finding out who may be the most qualified at the match that day. And I suggest the address and GPS coordinates be posted on the signs with the emergency numbers

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TRR is covered. Safety plan in place and we have former EMTs and current nurses in our posses.

EMS knows where we are and have been to the range a time or two.

First aid kit is stocked and checked every 6 months or more often.

with all that in place.....

hope we don't have to use it again (heat exhaustion case)

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something else to consider, signs with the info at every stage. Some ranges are spread out, and I know that almost everyone has a phone now a days, maybe make sure every posse is covered there as well...

 

not only first aid and trauma kits, but supplies for heat exhaustion as well,,,,, McDonalds has ice for $1 a bag,,,,,,on hot days that should be a must as well.....

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Have A doctor, a dentist, and a couple of preachers that shoot with us on a regular basis. Also have a backhoe.

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good points

however????????????????????

I drive old trucks with out air bags

 

I STILL RIDE MY BIKE (not harely) with out a helmit

 

I do NOT cock the hammer at less than 45 degrees

I do not have my finger in the trigger guard prior to 45 degrees

 

safety is important

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Have A doctor, a dentist, and a couple of preachers that shoot with us on a regular basis. Also have a backhoe.

What no proctologist? :)

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In light of the accident that recently happened, maybe it's time to step back and look at where we are considering safety.

 

 

Does you club have a safety plan, the one that is taught in Range Administration and Range design, if we take time to teach it or read it?

 

Does you club have signs like the one at Stoney Bottom? Do you know the correct number to call for an emergency,,?

 

Do you have emergency supplies on hand, (I used to carry a trauma kit all the time, I need to start carrying it again. I know that Firelands, a club near Stoney Bottom has them as several other clubs in OH. Pretty sure that Stoney Bottom has one or more.

 

Do you know who is most qualified to respond in your club?

 

 

Can a response team get to the range?

 

 

Do you know any of the answers to these questions, or do you let someone else take care of YOUR safety?

 

Do you even care?

 

 

CPBC

Yes we at Firelands have emergency kits and we are lucky that at any given shoot we have a couple nurses OR a doctor OR retired and active police and other LE folks that certainly can handle an emergency until the real thing arrives. We even have a veterinarian !!!

Same thing goes for all the shoots I attend in Ohio.

 

Rye ;)

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All good questions there CC. While the chances of dealing with a gunshot wound are small, it could happen.

 

I do think that the chances of heat exhaustion/stroke, dehydration and heart attack are substantially greater than a gunshot wound however. One range I shoot at has a de-fib set up at their first aid station......not that anyone would know how to use it.

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Have A doctor, a dentist, and a couple of preachers that shoot with us on a regular basis. Also have a backhoe.

 

That is freaking hilarious. :lol:

 

 

All good questions there CC. While the chances of dealing with a gunshot wound are small, it could happen.

 

I do think that the chances of heat exhaustion/stroke, dehydration and heart attack are substantially greater than a gunshot wound however. One range I shoot at has a de-fib set up at their first aid station......not that anyone would know how to use it.

 

We've got several pairs of jumper cables.... :ph34r:

 

:P:lol:

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I'd be more worried about a lawyer :lol:

LG

 

 

Proctologist - Lawyer......almost the same thing except with the proctologist you will only be violated once and it will over sooner.

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Have A doctor, a dentist, and a couple of preachers that shoot with us on a regular basis. Also have a backhoe.

The backhoe is the "Last Aid Kit", we use to have a shovel with a black cross on it an it was marked last aid kit.

 

This is all important stuff, how many ranges have a designated helipad. We just had RSO training at our range and went over emergency prepardness.

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Good questions, some I've been asking for years. I shoot competitive highpower rifle and to my knowledge, none of the clubs I shoot at have anything to handle a gunshot wound. I've also asked about AED's, Automatic Electronic Defibrilators which many hospitals and EMS services basically give out for free as they are given grant money from the Feds. Not always. You don't have to know how to work an AED, it tells you what to do, 3 steps and you are on your way to save a life. Along those lines, everyone here should be certified in CPR, its easy, its quick, and will save a life someday, maybe yours or someone you know.

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In light of the accident that recently happened, maybe it's time to step back and look at where we are considering safety.

 

 

Does you club have a safety plan, the one that is taught in Range Administration and Range design, if we take time to teach it or read it?

 

Does you club have signs like the one at Stoney Bottom? Do you know the correct number to call for an emergency,,?

 

Do you have emergency supplies on hand, (I used to carry a trauma kit all the time, I need to start carrying it again. I know that Firelands, a club near Stoney Bottom has them as several other clubs in OH. Pretty sure that Stoney Bottom has one or more.

 

Do you know who is most qualified to respond in your club?

 

 

Can a response team get to the range?

 

 

Do you know any of the answers to these questions, or do you let someone else take care of YOUR safety?

 

Do you even care?

 

 

CPBC

 

 

In light of the accident that recently happened, maybe it's time to step back and look at where we are considering safety.

 

Do you know the correct number to call for an emergency,,?

 

 

is it 411 PAIN, or 1 800 ask Gary ???

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All good questions there CC. While the chances of dealing with a gunshot wound are small, it could happen.

 

I do think that the chances of heat exhaustion/stroke, dehydration and heart attack are substantially greater than a gunshot wound however. One range I shoot at has a de-fib set up at their first aid station......not that anyone would know how to use it.

 

In FL heat stroke, dehydration and heart attack ARE WAY more likely than shooting yourself or being shot by another.

Eustis has a de-fib and I believe all the "official RO's" are trained to use it.

 

I have had CPR training and, although I never renewed it, I still remember Annie and trying to revive her.

Keeping your head in an emergency is probably the best help anyone can give.

 

 

Waimea

 

:FlagAm:

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Good to have an AED but no training is needed to use an AED. If you have one, make sure the batteries are current.

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Several shooters I know carry a bag of clotting agent just for wounds. Cheap insurance.

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Guest Winchester Jack, SASS #70195

What no proctologist? :)

 

:ph34r: we have a gynecologist

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What no proctologist? :)

 

:ph34r: we have a gynecologist

 

There are likely shooters that might need both someday.

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We have recently upgraded our safety focus. We have a former military corpsman that volunteers to be on duty at our Cowboy Action Shoots. We have designated area for ambulances to turn around, have invested in high quality trauma kits, posted first aid station sighs and watch spectators closely for eye and ear protection. We are also going to place "In Case of Emergency" signs with instructions to secure cease fire, admin first aid, call 911, clear explanation of location etc., wait for emergency services at gate and so forth. Always a potential for shooting injuries, but also aware of heart attack, stroke, heat exhaustion etc. I give the credit to the EMT'S for bringing it up. At first we made a few jokes, but then upon discussion decided it is better to be prepared for the worst and never need it. Always touted safety first and always, but we seem to be more aware and proactive just in case something happens.

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Yes-We even have an undertaker that shoots with us

Grits -go ya one better ... we have a shooter with the alias ... Cemetery!

Seriously - no written displays in case of accidents at the monthly matches. At our State Match - an ambulance with EMT's on site

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Cemetery is a fine gentleman!!! love to shoot with him!

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I am the designated "get the hot brass out of the cleavage guy", don't want ta git them ladies burned! :lol: Rye

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it'z a dirty job, Rye, but sumone's gotta do it!!!! ;):lol::P:P

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it'z a dirty job, Rye, but sumone's gotta do it!!!! ;):lol::P:P

:lol: That's what I've been telling' everyone! :lol:

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Rye picks em out, and I kiss the boo boos! :o:o:P:P:D

 

neener neener!! :P:P :P :P

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All good questions there CC. While the chances of dealing with a gunshot wound are small, it could happen.

 

I do think that the chances of heat exhaustion/stroke, dehydration and heart attack are substantially greater than a gunshot wound however. One range I shoot at has a de-fib set up at their first aid station......not that anyone would know how to use it.

 

 

 

In FL heat stroke, dehydration and heart attack ARE WAY more likely than shooting yourself or being shot by another.

Eustis has a de-fib and I believe all the "official RO's" are trained to use it.

 

I have had CPR training and, although I never renewed it, I still remember Annie and trying to revive her.

Keeping your head in an emergency is probably the best help anyone can give.

 

 

Waimea

 

:FlagAm:

 

I always have my di-fib and my trauma kit in my car at every shoot. Hopefully I will never have to use either one.

 

JEL

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good to know JL, make sure we all know it's there too, hate for you to go down and all we cud do is tu finish you off.... :o:P:P;);)

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Lets see, I rode in a open pick up bed recently on a dirt road no less, rode my horse without a helmet on my horse, pulled those dang safeties off my Marlins, and even carried six rounds in a single action revolver! Overall I firmly believe that this sport of CAS is exceptionally safe. If you plan for it you'll probably never need it. Play safe and carry on....

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Lets see, I rode in a open pick up bed recently on a dirt road no less, rode my horse without a helmet on my horse, pulled those dang safeties off my Marlins, and even carried six rounds in a single action revolver! Overall I firmly believe that this sport of CAS is exceptionally safe. If you plan for it you'll probably never need it. Play safe and carry on....

I can not believe you would allow your horse to go anywhere without his helmet. Sounds like animal cruelty.

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cowboy action shooting is very easily the safest sport / hobby that I have tried

 

hands down, very safe ;)

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All seriousness aside..

Aren't ya sposed to have a hot iron in the fire?

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