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A monster off the British coast:


Subdeacon Joe

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Rusting hulk of World War One German U-boat emerges after almost a century

Its hull astonishingly intact, a First World War German U-boat lies embedded in remote mudflats up an English

creek.While more than 40 of the deadly submarines met their fate in our waters during the conflict, this is the only one that can be seen.

 

The wreckage of the others lies hidden deep beneath the sea.

 

The existence of this one has long been known, but its eerie presence has gained fresh interest after tidal changes and the recent storms made it more visible.

Amazing.

 

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If you use Google Earth the wreck can be seen at ...

 

Google Earth
51.25.50.40N - 0.37.55.17E

Viewed @500'

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This little river inlet is where over 100 German submarines were taken after world WWI to be inspected and scrapped. Also of interest, take some time and look around the river and island edges. You will fine there are lots and lots of abandoned barges, ships and boats. Even sailing ships. Some just below the surface in the shallows.There are even areas of land reclamation using old barges and ships.

 

There is a maritime museum 6 miles up river from this wreck. In the center dry dock is an old HMS Ocelot and on the dock near the water there is a large scale movie model. About 3 miles further up the river there is another old submarine anchored in the upper area of the river bend.

Yes, I have an obsession with submarines.

 

That almost the title of a little web page I keep adding to. If anyone has something of interest not on my page and would like to share, I will be happy to include it.

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If you use Google Earth the wreck can be seen at ...

 

Google Earth

51.25.50.40N - 0.37.55.17E

Viewed @500'

---------------------

This little river inlet is where over 100 German submarines were taken after world WWI to be inspected and scrapped. Also of interest, take some time and look around the river and island edges. You will fine there are lots and lots of abandoned barges, ships and boats. Even sailing ships. Some just below the surface in the shallows.There are even areas of land reclamation using old barges and ships.

 

There is a maritime museum 6 miles up river from this wreck. In the center dry dock is an old HMS Ocelot and on the dock near the water there is a large scale movie model. About 3 miles further up the river there is another old submarine anchored in the upper area of the river bend.

Yes, I have an obsession with submarines.

 

That almost the title of a little web page I keep adding to. If anyone has something of interest not on my page and would like to share, I will be happy to include it.

 

Ohhh...nice little page! I'm surprised that "The Enemy Below" isn't on the list of movies.

 

You likely know about this site already: http://pigboats.com/subs/a-boats.html

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Glad to see this thread because a sub question popped into my mind for some reason. In the WWII movies the skipper looks through the periscope and says, "Fire one! Fire two!" etc. Then the XO (I assume) hits the big buttons to fire the tubes.

Is that the only firing panel in the boat or is there a redundant system from where the fish can also be launched? Like the torpedo rooms? Or the head? ;) Seems to me that would make sene.

 

Also whenever they're under a depth charge attack and water starts spraying around the control room, everybody just grabs a valve and closes it and the leak stops (while appropriate suspenseful music plays).

I'm thinking that

A. Seems like a pretty easy solution to stop sinking and,

B. Why didn't they close those valves before the water started squirting in?

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IIRC, WWII subs could have their torpedos fired mechanically (using a valve control that would fire the torpedo using compressed air) in the torpedo room. So far as those leaks taken care of by just closing a valve, I don't think it was necessarily that simple, depending on where the leak occurred. If the leak was severe enough, in a given compartment, it was possible to increase the pressure in that compartment to equal that of the sea. The watertight door(s) to that compartment would have been shut the minute the sub went to battlestations. Wish I had had a chance to ask these questions of RAdm A.C. "Acey" Burrowes, C.O. of the "Whale" during WWII. My uncle and my father knew him, and I met him a couple of times, but never thought about such things I'd seen in movies. I was a kid at the time.

 

Merry Christmas, everyone!

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Pigboats.com

 

Yes, I have that page bookmarked as well as many others.

 

I administer a submarine forum known as Sub Pirates. Mostly about building functional R/C models but a lot of the members are past or presently riding the boats. Several world navies represented.

 

I have built a few boats. Currently have an operational USS George Washington, SSBN 598. On the bench a Skipjack SSN 585 which will most likely be Sculpin. Over the years I have been collecting B-boat information to scratch build one of the three b-boats. Also on the bench are most of the parts to scratch build a HMS Gotland class. Waiting for pumps and motors to arrive. Next week maybe.

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As stated above. From the control room panel, torpedoes can be electrically fired. At the torpedo tube, they can be fire mechanically. Torpedoes are lunched using a water slug. There are very big air piston that with high pressure air move water in to the tube and eject the torpedo from the tube. In the movies you see the torpedo lunch with lots of bubbles. Those bubbles are not from the lunch. They are from the gas exhaust from the older gas motors in the torpedo it self. Modern torpedoes do not leave a gas bubble trail. They are electrically driven. Some are extremely fast.

 

Sorry....I tend to get windy about this subject. I'm involved with submarines almost daily. I'm done now.

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Pigboats.com

 

Yes, I have that page bookmarked as well as many others.

 

I administer a submarine forum known as Sub Pirates. Mostly about building functional R/C models but a lot of the members are past or presently riding the boats. Several world navies represented.

 

I have built a few boats. Currently have an operational USS George Washington, SSBN 598. On the bench a Skipjack SSN 585 which will most likely be Sculpin. Over the years I have been collecting B-boat information to scratch build one of the three b-boats. Also on the bench are most of the parts to scratch build a HMS Gotland class. Waiting for pumps and motors to arrive. Next week maybe.

---------

As stated above. From the control room panel, torpedoes can be electrically fired. At the torpedo tube, they can be fire mechanically. Torpedoes are lunched using a water slug. There are very big air piston that with high pressure air move water in to the tube and eject the torpedo from the tube. In the movies you see the torpedo lunch with lots of bubbles. Those bubbles are not from the lunch. They are from the gas exhaust from the older gas motors in the torpedo it self. Modern torpedoes do not leave a gas bubble trail. They are electrically driven. Some are extremely fast.

 

Sorry....I tend to get windy about this subject. I'm involved with submarines almost daily. I'm done now.

 

 

(sets a soapbox down for Cliff)

 

Wind away! Please. Fascinating stuff.

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