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Pistol sequence states "No Double Taps".....


Bucky Buscadero, SASS #73085

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3 pistol targets. Sequence calls for at least 1 round on each target but no double taps.

 

First pistol, shooter does a Nevada Sweep - P1, P2, P3, P2, P1. Second pistol, shooter shoots the same pattern, again starting on P1. A Procedural was called - since shooter shot P1 with last round of first pistol and first round of second pistol, it was ruled a double tap.

 

I am thinking that should not have been counted as a double tap since there was a transition from first to second pistol in between. I looked through the handbooks but did not find anything that addresses the question. Maybe I overlooked it as I thought I had come across that info sometime previously. So what is the authoritative answer, is it considered a double tap if there was a transition between rounds or not?

 

Bucky

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I'm not a authority, but I would call it a double tap. Our posse discussed that prior to shooting the stage and the PM, and stage writer, said that would be a double tap. If you allowed it what do you tell a Gunfighter?

 

 

+1

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Double tap. That instruction is easier understood as a CONTINUOUS 10 round sweep. Gunfighters have to shoot the same target sequence as those that transition from gun 1 to gun 2... So you're saying a GF'r would get a "P", but others wouldn't?

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Bucky, at one time most of us thought as you mentioned.

But as other mentioned, the rules have been clarified such that even if you switch pistols, it is still considered a double tap.

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It does depend on the exact wording of the stage instructions. If the instructions say, "with each pistol, engage the three targets at least once each, no double taps" I would say no call. If the instructions say, "with pistols, engage the three targets at least once each, no double taps" I'd go with the procedural.

 

Easy solution is to engage the targets 1,2,3,2,3 and then repeat. No questions there.

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I'd shoot that 1-2-1-2-1 ---- 3-2-3-2-3 works two handed or gunfighter.

 

 

Hey Grizz:

 

GF style.....put your left pistol on P1 and leave it there. With your Right pistol, alternate between P2 and P3.

 

It would be: P1, P2, P1, P3, P1, P2, P1, P3, P1, P2

 

No lead changes or cross overs.

 

OR, probably the simplist would be: 1-2-1-2-1-2-1-2-1-3

 

 

..........Widder

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Yeah, that's a double tap. Easy way to determine: if a GF shot it that way, would there be any doubt? 2 consecutive shots on the same target is a double tap.

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As a Double Duelist.

Think I would have done a nevada sweep starting on the left with my left hand.

Then a nevada sweep from the right with my right hand.

12321,32123

 

That way I only have to change the motion of my hand once with each hand.

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It does depend on the exact wording of the stage instructions. If the instructions say, "with each pistol, engage the three targets at least once each, no double taps" I would say no call. If the instructions say, "with pistols, engage the three targets at least once each, no double taps" I'd go with the procedural.

 

Easy solution is to engage the targets 1,2,3,2,3 and then repeat. No questions there.

 

Bud has it right. A lot of clubs write stages that are not clear. Detail is critical. In this case I agree that it is a P, but I would plant alot of the confusion on the stage writer. WW

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If the instructions say, "with each pistol, engage the three targets at least once each, no double taps" I would say no call.

 

Actually, if the instructions read that way, being so VERY unfriendly to gunfighters, I would expect a small stampede toward the parking lot. ;^)

 

Let's not encourage stage writers to even think about writing stages any more that specify what to do with "first revolver" and then "second revolver" and expecting that something special happens when the first revolver gets put away (like the no-double-tap warning gets a free "reset.")

 

A gun-type sequence is from the start of using that type of gun to the start of using the next specified type of gun. It's all one big sequence until the next type of gun is fired. So much easier to understand if you think about things that way when you have to figure out "was it a double tap?"

 

Good luck, GJ

 

 

 

 

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