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Captain Bill Burt

T.O. Checklist

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As a new RO1 I have created a mental checklist I go through to prepare for the next shooter. I would like to hear how other cowboys prepare for the next shooter.

 

Here's my checklist:

 

1. Are the workers clear?

2. Is the firing line clear of potential obstructions (shotgun shells, etc.)?

3. Are any reactive targets reset?

4. Do I have three spotters?

5. "Next Shooter."

6. Are all hammers down on pistols and rifle and is the shotgun clear?

7. Does the shooter have shotgun ammo?

8. Make sure guns are staged correctly.

9. Make sure shooter is in the correct position and posture (hand location etc.).

10. Make sure I'm in the correct position.

11. "Spotters be ready!"

12. A. No starting line "Alright Cowboy/Cowgirl starting with (stage description) indicate ready and I'll give you a standby and then the beep"

B. Starting line "Alright Cowboy/Cowgirl starting with (stage description) indicate ready by saying the line and I'll give you a standby and then the beep"

13. "Stand by, 1 second pause.

14. BEEP!

When i address the shooter I try to say the exact same thing each time and include the starting position........this reminds me to make sure they are in the correct position and reminds them as well. My goal is to provide everyone the same start.

 

No starting line

"Alright Cowboy/Cowgirl starting with hands on hat indicate ready and I'll give you a standby and then the beep"

 

Starting line

"Alright Cowboy/Cowgirl starting with hands on hat indicate ready by saying the line and I'll give you a standby and then the beep"

So what would you add, or take away?

Edited to reflect feedback.

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It'll get smoother as you go. The bit about checking the shooter and his gear/guns will become automatic as s/he approaches. If your club doesn't use spotters' sticks or some visual ID, then "do I have three spotters" for the first shooter, and I'd drop the "spotters ready" bit, just say "Is the shooter ready?" loud enough so they hear that too (when I spot it's my cue)...

 

Oh, for first shooter on the first stage, as he comes to the line, I turn to the gallery and announce "Eyes and ears, line going hot". On subsequent stages, "line going hot" before first shooter is launched...

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As a new RO1 I have created a mental checklist I go through to prepare for the next shooter. I would like to hear how other cowboys prepare for the next shooter.

 

Here's my checklist:

 

1. Are the workers clear?

2. Is the firing line clear of potential obstructions (shotgun shells, etc.)?

3. Are any reactive targets reset?

4. Do I have three spotters?

5. "Next Shooter."

6. Are all hammers down and the shotgun clear?

7. Does the shooter have shotgun ammo?

8. Does the shooter meet costuming/equipment requirements for their category?

9. Make sure guns are staged correctly.

10. Make sure shooter is in the correct position and posture (hand location etc.).

11. Make sure I'm in the correct position.

12. "Spotters be ready!"

12. On your line sir/ma'am.

13. "Standbye" 2-3 second pause.

14. BEEP!

 

So what would you add, or take away?

 

 

Thats all well but how long does it take you to run a stage? if your a TO of a posse of 15 or more with 3 to 4 other posses at the same shoot you have to observate(sp) and quick.

 

KK

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Stage set/clear?

"Next shooter"

"Spotters ready?"

"Does the shooter understand the course?"

"Give me your line when you are ready"

BEEP

 

Checking costuming, guns, etc... all happens real quick after some experience.

YMMV

Cash

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one important key is consistency.

 

If you ALWAYS say "is the shooter ready?", "Stand By", then hit the beep (or whatever the exact words), it's always the same and a shooter is good with it. Any variation messes with their heads and makes em angry, feeling like they got a false start.

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I am not smart enough, have a good enough memory or young enough to attempt to remember what category each shooter is shooting in, so I do not consider checking attire as my job as TO. That should be done off the shooting line IMHO.

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I don't run the timer much as I'm too fat to get out of my own way, much less any one elses. But I do run it for a few shooters here and there from time to time.

 

 

 

  1. When I take the timer I make sure I understand the course of fire, and know who the spotters are.
  2. Before each shooter, scan that the range is clear and targets reset before calling next shooter up.
  3. As they are coming up and staging I try to make sure they have shotgun shells, eyes and ears, as well as stage guns correctly.
  4. As the shooter is getting set, I often turn to the spotters to make sure they're paying attention, maybe say something like 'spotters' and maybe count them off 'one two three'
  5. If the shooter is not in the correct position I'll remind them 'behind the table, hands on hat'.
  6. Shooter ready? Stand by....BEEP.

 

All of this can be accomplished quite quickly. Nothing complicated or time consuming. But those are the steps I've learned by watching some very good TOs I've had the pleasure of shooting with.

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I am not smart enough, have a good enough memory or young enough to attempt to remember what category each shooter is shooting in, so I do not consider checking attire as my job as TO. That should be done off the shooting line IMHO.

Yep, check attire when you do the first-stage roll call. You should verify each shooter has been put in the category that they wanted, anyway. Then for the 2 costume-required categories (Classic and B-Western) - check their costume for required items. Or ask shooters in the same costumed category to check each other - that is always fun.

 

Good luck, GJ

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I would add that before anyone goes downrange to set targets they hollar down range and you respond down range.

All of what you list is spot on and will become second nature. One minor watch for thing is hammers down on rifles and pistols. no half cock or full cock. STQ

Clothing isn't important unless it's an annual or state and above match, just as powder and shooting style is.

 

Remember you're watching the shooter, the spotters are resonsible for counting and "P's". Hard habit to break.

Ike

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As a new RO1 I have created a mental checklist I go through to prepare for the next shooter. I would like to hear how other cowboys prepare for the next shooter.

 

Here's my checklist:

 

1. Are the workers clear?

2. Is the firing line clear of potential obstructions (shotgun shells, etc.)?

3. Are any reactive targets reset?

4. Do I have three spotters?

5. "Next Shooter."

6. Are all hammers down and the shotgun clear?

7. Does the shooter have shotgun ammo?

8. Does the shooter meet costuming/equipment requirements for their category?

9. Make sure guns are staged correctly.

10. Make sure shooter is in the correct position and posture (hand location etc.).

11. Make sure I'm in the correct position.

12. "Spotters be ready!"

12. On your line sir/ma'am.

13. "Standbye" 2-3 second pause.

14. BEEP!

 

So what would you add, or take away?

 

Fine list.

 

BTW, Mule Eared SG can have their hammers cocked when staged.Gun open, of course. If I see the external SG hammers not cocked, I will ask shooter if he wants it that way.

 

Yes, I do look for the rifle hammer to be fully down when shooter is first staging.

 

I don't worry about costuming on monthly matches.

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"Does the shooter understand the course?"

 

BEEP

 

Cash

 

Don't really believe that question is necessary. If shooter doesn't unnerstand course of fire, he should still be at loading table reading the scenario. :lol:

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Hi Captain and Others,

 

About costumes, I think that when the PM calls off the shooters' names at an annual, this is the time to check if anyone is signed up as BW or CC.

 

Also, number 12 shouldn't be necessary as you did that in number 4 and this should only take seconds.

 

Cash, most folks I've shot with lately, no longer ask if the shooter understands the course of fire. That should be implied in asking "is the shooter ready" or stating "indicate ready by saying your line," Bill's number 12.

 

Good job Captain Bill!

 

Regards,

 

Allie Mo

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PS Hey Jackie, we agree on something. ;)

 

I knew it'd happen sooner or later.

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It'll get smoother as you go. The bit about checking the shooter and his gear/guns will become automatic as s/he approaches. If your club doesn't use spotters' sticks or some visual ID, then "do I have three spotters" for the first shooter, and I'd drop the "spotters ready" bit, just say "Is the shooter ready?" loud enough so they hear that too (when I spot it's my cue)...

 

Oh, for first shooter on the first stage, as he comes to the line, I turn to the gallery and announce "Eyes and ears, line going hot". On subsequent stages, "line going hot" before first shooter is launched...

 

Both good points, thanks. At a couple of local clubs we have stages where the shooter starts 'with rifle in hands' which for us means aimed, in the cases I've observed spotters need to be focused, or they can miss the first shot(it can come almost instantly with a couple of shooters) hence #12.

 

Thats all well but how long does it take you to run a stage? if your a TO of a posse of 15 or more with 3 to 4 other posses at the same shoot you have to observate(sp) and quick.

 

KK

I run at about the same speed as the other cowboys who typically TO, we usually shoot about four stages between 9:00 - 9:30 and approximately 11:45 -12:00 with 15-20 shooters on the posse. So maybe 45 minutes a stage?

 

You forgot the part about taking the bribe money surreptitiously. :huh:

 

I should have thought of that.

 

one important key is consistency.

 

If you ALWAYS say "is the shooter ready?", "Stand By", then hit the beep (or whatever the exact words), it's always the same and a shooter is good with it. Any variation messes with their heads and makes em angry, feeling like they got a false start.

 

I try to make sure my interactions with shooters are always uniform especially the time from stand by to beep.

 

I am not smart enough, have a good enough memory or young enough to attempt to remember what category each shooter is shooting in, so I do not consider checking attire as my job as TO. That should be done off the shooting line IMHO.

 

Good point. At the very least get it out of the way on the first stage?

 

Fine list.

 

BTW, Mule Eared SG can have their hammers cocked when staged.Gun open, of course. If I see the external SG hammers not cocked, I will ask shooter if he wants it that way.

 

Yes, I do look for the rifle hammer to be fully down when shooter is first staging.

 

I don't worry about costuming on monthly matches.

 

With the shotgun I am looking for no loaded shells and open, until your post I hadn't thought of prompting them to cock mule ears, although I know that's legal. Thanks!

 

Hi Captain and Others,

 

About costumes, I think that when the PM calls off the shooters' names at an annual, this is the time to check if anyone is signed up as BW or CC.

 

Also, number 12 shouldn't be necessary as you did that in number 4 and this should only take seconds.

 

Cash, most folks I've shot with lately, no longer ask if the shooter understands the course of fire. That should be implied in asking "is the shooter ready" or stating "indicate ready by saying your line," Bill's number 12.

 

Good job Captain Bill!

 

Regards,

 

Allie Mo

Thanks Allie, and a belated Happy Birthday!

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When i address the shooter I try to say the exact same thing each time and include the starting position........this reminds me to make sure they are in the correct position and reminds them as well. My goal is to provide everyone the same start.

 

No starting line

"Alright Cowboy/Cowgirl starting with hands on hat indicate ready and I'll give you a standby and then the beep"

 

Starting line

"Alright Cowboy/Cowgirl starting with hands on hat indicate ready by saying the line and I'll give you a standby and then the beep"

 

It can be very monotonous when you say the same thing over and over and over especially if the starting position is rather long.......start standing with at least one foot behind the rail with hands at your side not touching any guns or ammo....

 

Stan

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When i address the shooter I try to say the exact same thing each time and include the starting position........this reminds me to make sure they are in the correct position and reminds them as well. My goal is to provide everyone the same start.

 

No starting line

"Alright Cowboy/Cowgirl starting with hands on hat indicate ready and I'll give you a standby and then the beep"

 

Starting line

"Alright Cowboy/Cowgirl starting with hands on hat indicate ready by saying the line and I'll give you a standby and then the beep"

 

It can be very monotonous when you say the same thing over and over and over especially if the starting position is rather long.......start standing with at least one foot behind the rail with hands at your side not touching any guns or ammo....

 

Stan

Thanks Stan, I like the idea of including the correct position in my statement to the shooter.

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My only addition would be to check that the shooter has his/her eyes protected and the hearing protection correctly installed ...... not just hanging around their neck.

 

As for not worring about costume requirements at monthlys .... I disagree, the "not complying because it's only a monthly club shoot" concept/habit can lead to some considerable embarrasment/anguish if one visits another range or shows up at a larger match and finds that the argument of "this is how we always do it at home" doesn't really count. Same with lax Loading/Unloading table procedures ...... and some other things that seem to happen because "it's only our monthly club shoot" .....

 

 

Respectfully wbj

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Brass Up ?

Targets Up?

 

Shooter UP!

 

SHOOTER READY?

Gimme the line and we'll go.

(line)

STANDBY

beep

 

(Items IN CAPS are said with our OUTSIDE VOICE.

Other itmes are said using our "inside voice".)

 

Piece of cake.

 

FWIW..YMMV..SOso

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My only addition would be to check that the shooter has his/her eyes protected and the hearing protection correctly installed ...... not just hanging around their neck.

 

As for not worring about costume requirements at monthlys .... I disagree, the "not complying because it's only a monthly club shoot" concept/habit can lead to some considerable embarrasment/anguish if one visits another range or shows up at a larger match and finds that the argument of "this is how we always do it at home" doesn't really count. Same with lax Loading/Unloading table procedures ...... and some other things that seem to happen because "it's only our monthly club shoot" .....

 

 

Respectfully wbj

Some clubs allow shorts and T shirts when it is over 100 degrees in the shade for monthly shoots.

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Don't wanna sound too picky, but 2-3 seconds after "stand by" is a long time to wait.

 

I have to agree with Max. You need to know whether the timer goes off when you push the button or release it, of course, but some of the best shooters will be jumping the gun if you keep them there 3 seconds after the call "Standby." I think one second (1000 and 1)is about right. It should not be Standby/beep all at once either. The most important thing is being consistent, one shooter to the next, and the same shooter, stage to stage.

 

Cassalong Hopidy

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Don't wanna sound too picky, but 2-3 seconds after "stand by" is a long time to wait.

:lol:

You don't sound too picky. I aim for consistency, and that seems to be about the standard time around here, so that's what I go for. As I'm saying stand by I'm moving the timer towards the shooter's ear and mentally counting three, about the time I hit three I take my finger off the button (it may be closer to 1-2 seconds). I've never had a complaint about taking too long, although admittedly I've only been running the timer for a little over a month, but I have been told twice it was too fast.

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I have to agree with Max. You need to know whether the timer goes off when you push the button or release it, of course, but some of the best shooters will be jumping the gun if you keep them there 3 seconds after the call "Standby." I think one second (1000 and 1)is about right. It should not be Standby/beep all at once either. The most important thing is being consistent, one shooter to the next, and the same shooter, stage to stage.

 

Cassalong Hopidy

You've seen me run the timer Cass, should I speed it up a touch?

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Don't wanna sound too picky, but 2-3 seconds after "stand by" is a long time to wait.

 

 

:blink: :blink: :blink: :blink: :blink: :blink: :wacko: :wacko: :wacko:

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6. Are all hammers down and the shotgun clear?

 

 

as previously posted Hammered Shotguns can have thier hammers cocked and action open.

For the life of me I cant seen to get the hammer of my 97 down when the action is open and empty. :)

 

also...there are very experienced people out there who will stage thier rifle with the hammer on half cock...but they dont like it when you call them on it. :wacko:

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...

 

also...there are very experienced people out there who will stage thier rifle with the hammer on half cock...but they dont like it when you call them on it. :wacko:

 

I wouldn't be exactly thrilled about getting a SDQ either.

(that IS the correct call, BTW)

 

REF: SHB p.23 #22.

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PWB...There is always a few trying to get an edge...This "Experienced Shooter" will be the first to call others out....but that just makes life interesting.

(I have mentioned it to an RO instructor...hopefully he took care of that issue.)

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You've seen me run the timer Cass, should I speed it up a touch?

 

 

Honestly have not paid close attention, Bill. If you have run it for me, I'd bet you are getting off in a second though or I would have noticed. If you say 1000 and 1at a speaking pace, I think you would agree that gives the shooter enough time without keeping him in suspense.

 

CH

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as previously posted Hammered Shotguns can have thier hammers cocked and action open.

For the life of me I cant seen to get the hammer of my 97 down when the action is open and empty. :)

 

also...there are very experienced people out there who will stage thier rifle with the hammer on half cock...but they dont like it when you call them on it. :wacko:

 

I should have been more clear, I was referring to pistol and rifle hammers, I'm aware mule ears can be cocked, and clearly achieving an open action and a lowered hammer on a 97 would take some doing. ;)

 

I wouldn't be exactly thrilled about getting a SDQ either.

(that IS the correct call, BTW)

 

REF: SHB p.23 #22. [/size]

 

Yep, already had to make that call twice, both times with an inexperienced LTO.

 

Honestly have not paid close attention, Bill. If you have run it for me, I'd bet you are getting off in a second though or I would have noticed. If you say 1000 and 1at a speaking pace, I think you would agree that gives the shooter enough time without keeping him in suspense.

 

CH

 

I think you're right Cass, I probably count quicker in my head than out loud.

 

I appreciate all the feedback, it helps me fine tune my checklist. :)

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Don't forget to check YOURSELF once every so often. Been through 10 shooters on a run 'n gun and haven't slugged down any water on a 90 degree day?

Find you eyes wandering/brain fading? Did you get lost on the rifle count and you aren't sure if that was 9 or 10? Ask for a replacement and take a break.

 

I always say the same thing " When you're ready, say the line (or say "ready" if there's no line) and I'll give you Standby, then the beep."

 

The most important shooter in the match is the one you just called to the line. They deserve the best you can do. Being "sharp" isn't just for giving each shooter a fair, consistant RO -- it's a huge safety issue. You can have match after match of uneventful RO-ing and then YIKES! You had better be on your toes.

 

I was just reminded of that (again) this last weekend. Fairly new shooter, been to a couple of matches, squib on first shot out of first pistol (Rifle was first gun) Nobody but me heard it. Shooter had no clue. I hollered "Squib! Ground it! He looked at me real confused and turned back and cocked the pistol to keep going. I hollered some more and pointing to the table got it through to him I wanted that gun down NOW.

 

It was a squib and maybe a Ruger would not have let go the way I've seen another gun do but I'd rather not test it. When it was all over and had been explained, he thanked me and the owner of the pistol thanked me.

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Funny you should mention that Lou, one of my shooters had a squib this Saturday and I said exactly the same thing! He is very experienced, grounded right away on the table and kept going. I expect he would have caught it without me, but I yelled stop as quick as I could (and so did a bunch of posse members).

 

I agree with you about taking care of yourself too. Dirt Merchant cautioned me to stick to no more than six shooters a stage.

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Please don't ask me if I understand the course of fire...it takes away from the entertainment value of my P.

 

Also, no TOP SHOOTER or EXPERIENCED SHOOTER that I've ever run into would purposly cheat by having their hammer anywhere other then fully down on an empty chamber. The risk/reward ratio is WAY too high!

 

But what do I know...other then some folks have a thing against Top Shooters.

 

<_<

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