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Subdeacon Joe

Deja's "Recipe" Thread Got Me Thinking

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And, since I don't want to highjack her thread in which she is asking specifically about breakfast recipes, I thought I would start a new one asking about dinner and supper (or lunch and dinner) recipes.

 

I ran across this recently:

 

Sirloin Of Beef En Epigram

 

Having roasted a sirloin of beef, take it off the spit, and. raise the skin carefully off. Then cut out the lean part of the beef, but observe not to cut near the ends or sides. Hash the meat in the following manner : cut it into pieces about the size of a crown-piece, put half a pint of stock into a tossing pan, an onion chopped fine, two spoonsful of ketchup, some pepper and salt, six small pickled cucumbers cut in thin slices, and the gravy that comes from the beef, with a little butter rolled in flour. Put in the meat, and toss it up for five minutes ; put it on the sirloin, and then put the skin over, and send it to table. One version of that, in a 1828 recipe book, says to garnish with lemon and pickles before serving.

 

Note also that it just says "ketchup" (in some versions catsup) but doesn't specify which kind. Oyster? Walnut? Grape? Fish (worchester sauce)? Tomato (which in the early 1800s was just becoming an accepted food)?

 

So, what oddball stuff have you run across?

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Well, it's not a dinner recipe but you'll need something to wash that Sirloin of Beef En Epigram down with. Also alledged to be a good rejunivator for whatever "ales" you :rolleyes: . I brew ale a few times a year but never felt adventurous enough to try this :

 

 

Cock Ale

 

From Home Brewing Wiki

One of the most specialized of the so-called specialty beer styles, Cock Ale is beer which is dry-hopped with a parboiled chicken which has been soaked in sherry wine.

Brewing Cock Ale

The most often quoted recipe is one that was collected by William Carew Hazlitt (grandson of <a class="external text" title="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Hazlitt" href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Hazlitt" rel="nofollow">William Hazlitt), in his 1886 collection Old Cookery-Books and Ancient Cuisine. The recipe reads:

 

To make Cock AleTake ten gallons of ale, and a large cock, the older the better, parboil the cock, flea him, and stamp him in a stone mortar till his bones are broken, (you must craw and gut him when you flea him) put the cock into two quarts of sack, and put to it three pounds of raisins of the sun stoned, some blades of mace, and a few cloves; put all these into a canvas bag, and a little before you find the ale has done working, put the ale and bag together into a vessel; in a week or nine days' time bottle it up, fill the bottles but just above the necks, and leave the same time to ripen as other ale.

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Well, that was different. I wonder if that started off as some sort of medicament to get some "meat" into someone who couldn't chew food. Here is a modern take on it:

 

Alternate recipe:

Brutal, eh? I was also given a modern recipe written by some guy named C.J.J. Berry.... Here goes this one...

 

"Take a few pieces of _cooked_ chicken and a few chicken bones (approx one tenth of the edible portion of the bird) well crushed or minced.

 

Also take half of pound of raisins, a very little mace, and one or maybe two cloves. Add all these ingrediants to half a bottle of string country white wine. Soak for 24 hrs. Then make on gallon of beer as follows:

 

1 lb Malt extract

1 Oz Hops

1/2 lb demerarra sugar

1 gallon water

Yeast and nutrient

 

Add the whole of the chicken mixture to the beer at the end of the second day. Fermentation will last six or seven days longer than usual and the ale should be matured at least one month in the bottle. This cock ale is of the barley wine type.

 

That taken from http://hbd.org/brewery/cm3/recs/13_23.html

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I wonder what that stuff tastes like - chicken?

 

 

Here is one review:

 

Well, after two months of stewing bottle conditioning, how did it go? Given that it was a drink favoured by the infirm, we set our best enfeebled tasters to the task.

 

The first impression in the glass is unbelievable clarity. We’ve never seen an un-fined beer this clear in less than six or seven months in the bottle. Even the independent judge who has been around a lot of homebrew commented. The nose is fresh hay, the mouth feel is crisp and slightly dry at the front with the burnt taste of the sherry in the mid-taste. The after-taste has hints of the spice and fruit and the finish is big alcohol and a slight hint of oiliness which limits the dryness. The initial flatness from one month in has gone, leaving a very drinkable drop. As a liqueur ale, it is for sipping rather than quaffing.

 

We had to unleash it at the conferention in the brewing competition. It didn’t win its category, but did get some good comments from the judges and other competitors. A few people are now interested in making their own, which was the point all along.

 

So, apparently it DOESN'T taste like chicken.

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On the subject of chicken, my late wife came up with this one. -- GIT

 

Pollo de Maria -- by Mary Stabler

 

I skinless, boneless chicken breast per serving

Whole green chilies, 1 per chicken piece (Anaheim chilies are generally the mildest

Strips of mild Mexican Velveeta cheese, 1 strip per chicken piece

2 well-beaten eggs

Finely crushed soda cracker crumbs, Ritz crackers work OK too

Flour

 

Place the chicken breast between two pieces of plastic wrap. Look closely at the chicken; there will be a sort of a skin side and the side that was attached to the ribs. Make sure that the "skin" side is down. Using a meat hammer, small tooth side, gently pound the chicken until it is as thin as possible. Be careful not to pound holes in the chicken

 

Take a thin strip of cheese and stuff the green chili. Dredge the chili in flour; wrap the chicken around the chili. Be careful to tuck the chili inside the chicken. The flour on the chili will help the chicken to wrap and stay. Dredge the chicken roll in flour; dip in the beaten egg, then roll in the cracker crumbs. Do this with each serving of chicken. Experience has shown that one per person is not always quite enough, so a couple extra might be a good idea

 

Deep fry the chicken in vegetable oil, being careful not to let the oil get too hot. It must be hot enough to cook the chicken slowly and thoroughly, but not hot enough to burn the cracker crumbs. Serve under salsa (preferably home made).

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I wonder what that stuff tastes like - chicken?

 

 

 

I've heard of the "Lquid Lunch", but this takes da cake !! :lol: :lol:

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I've heard of the "Lquid Lunch", but this takes da cake !! :lol: :lol:

 

No, no. Chicken, not cake.

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And, since I don't want to highjack her thread in which she is asking specifically about breakfast recipes, I thought I would start a new one asking about dinner and supper (or lunch and dinner) recipes.

 

I ran across this recently:

 

Sirloin Of Beef En Epigram

 

Having roasted a sirloin of beef, take it off the spit, and. raise the skin carefully off. Then cut out the lean part of the beef, but observe not to cut near the ends or sides. Hash the meat in the following manner : cut it into pieces about the size of a crown-piece, put half a pint of stock into a tossing pan, an onion chopped fine, two spoonsful of ketchup, some pepper and salt, six small pickled cucumbers cut in thin slices, and the gravy that comes from the beef, with a little butter rolled in flour. Put in the meat, and toss it up for five minutes ; put it on the sirloin, and then put the skin over, and send it to table. One version of that, in a 1828 recipe book, says to garnish with lemon and pickles before serving.

 

Note also that it just says "ketchup" (in some versions catsup) but doesn't specify which kind. Oyster? Walnut? Grape? Fish (worchester sauce)? Tomato (which in the early 1800s was just becoming an accepted food)?

 

So, what oddball stuff have you run across?

 

 

Hey you.. hijacker.. lol... Its cool... I never mind at all.. cuz you guys add stuff to my posts...hijack away.. lol You are a great cook I know that.. lol Odd ball... hmmmm Okay I put cocoa in chilii... sick, huh?

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Hey you.. hijacker.. lol... Its cool... I never mind at all.. cuz you guys add stuff to my posts...hijack away.. lol You are a great cook I know that.. lol Odd ball... hmmmm Okay I put cocoa in chilii... sick, huh?

 

No, that is classic. A touch of cinnamon too.

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No, that is classic. A touch of cinnamon too.

 

 

Never tried that... Sounds interesting.. lol

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