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66 or 73 Muskets?


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I don't think they still make em.

But I have a Uberti 66 musket in 45 colt.

 

Are these muskets SASS legal?

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They are musket in name only.

They are rifled barreled.

The forearm is extra long and the buttstock is relatively normal.

 

So my answer is they are legal.

 

Mine is essentially a replica Winchester 1866 with a long barrel 24" with long forearm.

Chambered in 45 Colt.

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They are musket in name only.

They are rifled barreled.

The forearm is extra long and the buttstock is relatively normal.

 

So my answer is they are legal.

 

Mine is essentially a replica Winchester 1866 with a long barrel 24" with long forearm.

Chambered in 45 Colt.

 

 

What do you mean "in name only"? Musket is what Winchester called them back in the day. Winchester used 3 designations for the 3 configurations: carbine, rifle, and musket. Only carbines and muskets had barrel bands. No barrel bands = rifle, no matter the barrel length, even the shorties down to 13" or so.

But the long barrels with carbine bands were always called muskets and most had a bayonet lug tho contracts to the US military never materialized. Sold a ton to the Turks and others tho.

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:FlagAm::FlagAm::FlagAm::FlagAm::FlagAm:

 

Yep, no reason that they ain't SASS-legal. ???

I know a Pard who regularly shoots a Marlin M-1894 that's got a 32" barrel.

Half octagon too. Looks way cool!

 

MG

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Pard,

Musket is a smooth bore, no rifling.

see wickapedia for alllll the details.

Best

CR

 

 

That's the classic definition. However, Winchester used to name some guns that as well, mostly when trying to snag military contracts.

 

http://www.collectorsfirearms.com/admin/product_details.php?itemID=25717

 

http://www.rarewinchesters.com/gunroom/1873/model_73.shtml

 

http://www.nramuseum.com/the-museum/the-galleries/the-american-west/case-42-the-guns-that-won-the-west-colt-winchester/winchester-model-1895-nra-musket.aspx

 

http://shop.lobogunz.ieasysite.com/productinfo.aspx?productid=WINCH92NRA-MUSKET

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Howdy

 

Goody is correct. Winchester made their rifles in three basic configurations.

 

Rifle, Carbine, and Musket. Had nothing to do with length, had to do with the configuration of the gun.

 

Rifles had a crescent shaped buttstock with a cast buttplate, the forend had a metal cap on it, and the magazine was hung below the barrel from a hanger dovetailed into the frame. Rifles could have barrels of any length. The first two Winchesters in the following photo are of the Rifle configuration.

 

Carbines had short barrels, but no shorter than some rifles. Carbines had a less curved buttstock and the butt plate was formed from a piece of heavy sheet metal. Carbines had a flat along the top of the buttstock. There was no metal on the end of the forend and the magazine was hung from the barrel by two barrel bands. The third rifle down in the photo is a carbine.

 

The Musket configuration was simply an overgrown carbine. Muskets had the same type of buttstock and buttplate as the Carbines. The barrels were usually long, 30 inches or more was common. The forend extended almost all the way to the muzzle and the magazine was suspended from the barrel by two or more barrel bands. Since they were often sold to foreign governments for military use they often had bayonet mounts. In the Winchester world of the 19th Century, Muskets were always rifled. The bottom firearm in the accompanying photo is a 1873 built in the Musket configuration.

 

Winchester Configurations

 

And don't forget, the War Between the States was fought with Rifled Muskets.

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