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Ejector tube came off


West Texas Sully

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:lol: Funny because it happened while unloading after the stage, and not while trying to reload against the clock. I know this must have happened to others, and I'm wondering what words of wisdom others may have for me.

 

The ejector tube screw had backed out on one of my USFA 45s. I used a screwdriver and retightened that one, and then checked the screw on my other revolver. Appeared to still be tight.

 

So - loctite? Just check it before each match? Other ideas?

 

Thanks!!

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Use the Loctite Blue, NOT the Red. If you can find the Loctite Purple, it is even better -- it will release the screw without stripping the head. I use the purple on all of my fiearms and haven't lost a screw in ages. I got mine through Amazon.com.

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{quote}

So - loctite? Just check it before each match? Other ideas?

Yep, blue loctite. Check the rest of the screws - especially grip-to-frame screws.

 

If you don't have some yet, get good gunsmithing screwdrivers that fit the screw slots well. Brownell Magnatips are recommended.

 

Good luck, GJ

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{quote}

If you don't have some yet, get good gunsmithing screwdrivers that fit the screw slots well. Brownell Magnatips are recommended.

 

Good luck, GJ

 

+1 on the Brownell Magnatips Set -- have one in my cart and one on the work bench.

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I once made about fifteen feet with mine when it came off while shooting. I was at an indoor range and knew that the spring HAD to be there since the housing was. Finally found it inside of a bucket they used to gather spent brass.....Since then I check them every time I go to shoot. I'll have to try the loctite, though they have never been loose since, either, that or they haven't had a chance to really work loose...... :blink:

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howdy,

Just stop by your favorite car parts store and git some purple loctite.

If they dont have it they can probably git it, mine got some in one day.

Fingernail polish will work but be careful as it can work too well.

I think the latest replacement screws from ruger have little plastic dots on em.

Magna tips are a great idea, half a dozen tips and a small handle can be worth

their weight in gold.

Best

CR

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Had the same thing happen to me at my last shoot, although mine happened at the firing line and the ejector rod, spring and screw all launched themselves downrange about six feet. I got everything back except the spring, which apparently rolled between two boards on the elevated wooden "sidewalk" of the scenario's prop.

 

I put mine back togehter with low-strength Loctite just as you have been advised to do. I doubt if I'll have any further trouble with it.

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Happened to me many years ago and you can even finish the match without it. After seeing how much and how quickly black powder residue was channeling into the tube, I leave thet screw only lightly tensioned and remove the assembly after every match. Do the same with the Cylinder pin cross latch, I no longert want them torqued or glued anymore as this causes buggered screws with frequent disassembly. Whether black or smokeless, most/all residue from the case gets blasted forward and that is where most of your cleaning needs to be done. Perhaps adds five minutes per revolver to the overall cleaning time, whether thorough strip down or normal quick clean.

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I forgot to mention that I ordered a new ejector rod spring from USFA's website the day after the shoot, and had it before the end of the week. No problem at all with their order or delivery system, and I could have had it overnight if there'd been any hurry.

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Couple things to know about Colt SAA clone ejector tubes...

 

Some of them DO NOT have the "stud" seated in the barrel that the ejector

tube end should fit over, then is fastened down with a screw that threads into the stud.

 

If your pistol only has the ejector tube fastened with a short screw and a couple of

threads into a blind threaded hole into the barrel itself, you will have continuing

trouble with this. .45 caliber barrels are bad, because there is little steel in the

barrel to thread this blind hole into.

 

Real Colt's have a stud fitted into the barrel itself that the ejector tube assembly

fits down over, and then the screw threads into the stud, altogether a much more secure

arrangement.

 

Heavy blackpowder loads or any other heavy recoiling load

and their resultant recoil will eventually loosen the kind that

are just screwed into a blind hole in the barrel itself without the stud to take the loads.

and will sooner or later fail.

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Would like to add, REALLY torquing down on that screw is NOT a good thing, If you strip the threads out of the barrel, you have a real problem. Moderate torque with Loc Tite or clear nail polish.

 

Coffinmaker

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