Jump to content
SASS Wire Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Charlie MacNeil, SASS #48580

Priming epiphany

Recommended Posts

While priming a bunch of Magtech brass shotshell hulls tonight, I discovered something amazingly important: it is a very good idea to make sure that the primer (Winchester Large Pistol) is started in the primer pocket before whacking the primer seating tool (a 3/8" x 4" pipe nipple with a cap on it) with the mallet. Otherwise there is a relatively loud bang and a quantity of black smoke which erupts from beneath the head of the hull. Such an occurrence brings a temporary lapse of attention to an end in very short order...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a dowel that fits inside the shell and about 1/2 longer than the case. I start the primer by hand then put the shell horizonally in my work vise with the dowel inside and give it a gentle crank. Seats the primer, doesn't mar the case mouth and ..so far...no unwanted booms. We won't discuss 1970s shag carpet, spilled primers and vaccuum cleaners though... :lol:

 

Mingo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a dowel that fits inside the shell and about 1/2 longer than the case. I start the primer by hand then put the shell horizonally in my work vise with the dowel inside and give it a gentle crank. Seats the primer, doesn't mar the case mouth and ..so far...no unwanted booms. We won't discuss 1970s shag carpet, spilled primers and vaccuum cleaners though... :lol:

 

Mingo

Y recon that same dowel chucked up in a drill press would work

 

Just askin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

RCBS makes a shell holder that allows 12GA hulls to be primed on a regular reloading press. (or at least they did) It wasn't listed in the catalog, but if you call, they most likely have it. I think it's around $20.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Had the same thing happen to me once. Scared me so bad I jumped back, spilled my beer and dropped my cigarette. :o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

RCBS makes a shell holder that allows 12GA hulls to be primed on a regular reloading press. (or at least they did) It wasn't listed in the catalog, but if you call, they most likely have it. I think it's around $20.

 

 

 

Here is one that Midway has

 

You would need a press with a 1 1/4"-12 thread, I just sold an old Lyman turret press that had a bushing for a larger die. If you do not have one they are out there and not too much money.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just another thread that proves some people have no business reloading.

 

Gunstock Smith

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use one of the RCBS shell hholders and the Lee ram primer. Works on my

Lee Challenger press. Regards, TJ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just another thread that proves some people have no business reloading.

 

Gunstock Smith

 

 

And that some people have no business posting.

 

When reloading brass shotshells, the method described is a long standing accepted way of priming cases.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have Mec shotshell loader start the large pistol primer in the Magtech shell, I do it on a flat plate on the bench with the shell in one hand and primer sunny side down, then move it in to the Mec primer seating station and seat the primer. Then move to powder and shot station and dump powder, wad, shot, and over shot card. Pull it out and glue with Duco cement. Much easyer then dipping powder and shot.

 

P.S. The sound of the expended Magtech hull as it hits a wood board walk is almost as good as how the hulls look in your shotshell belt.

 

Fordyce

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just another thread that proves some people have no business reloading.

 

Gunstock Smith

 

Hey Gunstock, I ain't gonnna pile on, so you might want to check this out:

 

RMC Brass Shotshell Reloading Instructions

 

I have never been overly comfy hammering a shotshell case over a live primer, but after three years of doing so, I've only had one go POP! It was a memorable experience, and a true reminder of the need for wearing safety glasses while reloading. (After that incident, I even considerd adding an adult diaper to my PPE! :o )

 

Be safe and shoot straight!

 

ol' poke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's been my experience that those who are willing to share their experiences have learned from that experience and by sharing allow others to learn from the same experience. It takes balls to admit a mistake, especially in front of such a large audience. Thank you for doing so. If we only think of ourselves as infallible and incapable of mistakes, it can be dangerous business.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a dowel that fits inside the shell and about 1/2 longer than the case. I start the primer by hand then put the shell horizonally in my work vise with the dowel inside and give it a gentle crank. Seats the primer, doesn't mar the case mouth and ..so far...no unwanted booms.

 

Mingo

I use a similar method except I use a BIG pair of slip joint pliers (I put a scrap piece of Formica counter top between the primer and the jaw of the pliers) instead of the vise. I prefer to feel the primer seat.

 

Fear of such an occurrence as Charlie describes is why I do it the way I do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The RCBS shell holder works in yer ordinary single stage or turret press like ya load handgun brass on. I made one essentially the same, and use it on a Lee turret for the MEC shells. No die is required, it's just the shell plate for the ram......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've heard rumors that 209 primers are quite a bit louder than large pistol primers. :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a dowel that fits inside the shell and about 1/2 longer than the case. I start the primer by hand then put the shell horizonally in my work vise with the dowel inside and give it a gentle crank. Seats the primer, doesn't mar the case mouth and ..so far...no unwanted booms. We won't discuss 1970s shag carpet, spilled primers and vaccuum cleaners though... :lol:

 

Mingo

 

 

If it really was 1970's carpet it was probably time to replace anyway.............

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've heard rumors that 209 primers are quite a bit louder than large pistol primers. :rolleyes:

 

 

Seems like I remember accidently dumping about a half load of shot all over my MEC 600. I cleaned it all up - sort of - there was one little bb hiding down in the primer seating well. About the third hull into a loading session the stars alaigned & that little sucker got itself right in the center of a primer being seated. It was definately a "Depends" experience ............. :wacko: :wacko:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wasn't trying to be smartass ( and I know how!). Even if that is the way that's "accepted" as right by some doesn't mean you should lose every lick of sense you ever had !! Remember, the lowly primer is the most dangerous reloading component we use. It can cause the loss of an eye or the use of a finger instantly. ANY method that uses a mallet or hammer to seat live primers is a method anyone who has any knowledge of reloading techniques will avoid like the plague. There have been several SAFE methods mentioned above. I suggest you adopt one of them and stay safe and healthy.

 

Gunstock

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it really was 1970's carpet it was probably time to replace anyway.............

 

Nah... It was all the rage in '74....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I might point out that those of us who began our reloading careers with the lowly but perfectly functional Lee Classic Loader were quite familiar with the method... that's just how the priming was done. -_-

 

And one would occasionally *pop* and life went on! ^_^

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use one of the RCBS shell hholders and the Lee ram primer. Works on my

Lee Challenger press. Regards, TJ

 

+1 for the Lee Ram-Prime. Works real slick and easy. I can prime all my brass hulls in half the time. You get a real good feel as they seat, and it is safer,too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's been my experience that those who are willing to share their experiences have learned from that experience and by sharing allow others to learn from the same experience. It takes balls to admit a mistake, especially in front of such a large audience. Thank you for doing so. If we only think of ourselves as infallible and incapable of mistakes, it can be dangerous business.

Well said, Buck!

 

I prefer to hear about other's learning experiences; so I can feel especially stupid when I repeat them. :rolleyes:

 

Thanks Charlie!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Had the same thing happen to me once. Scared me so bad I jumped back, spilled my beer and dropped my cigarette. :o

that is a reloading P with a safety

 

P for the spilled Beer and a Safety for dropping the cigarette

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wasn't trying to be smartass ( and I know how!). Even if that is the way that's "accepted" as right by some doesn't mean you should lose every lick of sense you ever had !! Remember, the lowly primer is the most dangerous reloading component we use. It can cause the loss of an eye or the use of a finger instantly. ANY method that uses a mallet or hammer to seat live primers is a method anyone who has any knowledge of reloading techniques will avoid like the plague. There have been several SAFE methods mentioned above. I suggest you adopt one of them and stay safe and healthy.

 

Gunstock

 

are You for real Gunstock I have a lee reloading set similar to what the OP is using and it says in the directions to use a hammer to set the primer,if I remember I will post pics later

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Had a primer detonate in a hand priming tool, near as I could tell there was about 70 of them little buggers in that tray that went along with it. Blew the hole thing into pieces. Got the scars on the back of my wrist and holes in the ceiling where some of the lid was embedded as proof.

Ya never know when things will go off track.

 

KC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And that some people have no business posting.

 

When reloading brass shotshells, the method described is a long standing accepted way of priming cases.

 

Thanks, J. Mark.

 

 

If you have Mec shotshell loader start the large pistol primer in the Magtech shell, I do it on a flat plate on the bench with the shell in one hand and primer sunny side down, then move it in to the Mec primer seating station and seat the primer. Then move to powder and shot station and dump powder, wad, shot, and over shot card. Pull it out and glue with Duco cement. Much easyer then dipping powder and shot.

 

P.S. The sound of the expended Magtech hull as it hits a wood board walk is almost as good as how the hulls look in your shotshell belt.

 

Fordyce

 

I do have a MEC. I'll have to give that a try. Thanks!

 

 

It's been my experience that those who are willing to share their experiences have learned from that experience and by sharing allow others to learn from the same experience. It takes balls to admit a mistake, especially in front of such a large audience. Thank you for doing so. If we only think of ourselves as infallible and incapable of mistakes, it can be dangerous business.

 

That was indeed my motivation for posting. Just a gentle reminder that we are indeed far from perfect, and that stuff can happen when we least expect it. Thanks, Buck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I's also hard on your underware.... Especially when your bunghole clamps down and cuts a donut from them....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wasn't trying to be smartass ( and I know how!). Even if that is the way that's "accepted" as right by some doesn't mean you should lose every lick of sense you ever had !! Remember, the lowly primer is the most dangerous reloading component we use. It can cause the loss of an eye or the use of a finger instantly. ANY method that uses a mallet or hammer to seat live primers is a method anyone who has any knowledge of reloading techniques will avoid like the plague. There have been several SAFE methods mentioned above. I suggest you adopt one of them and stay safe and healthy.

 

Gunstock

Howdy:

 

Gosh! Why didn't someone tell Lee about this? For gosh sakes they must have sold a million Lee Shot shell loader kits (of which I have several) that use this basic method.... as did all the old simple to operate Lee Loader kits. Just wondering'....

 

STL Suomi

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MEC makes an adaptor for the 600JR for capping and de-capping Brass SG shells. IIRC, about $40.00.

 

Not in the catalog or on-line. You must call, request the kit and order from the factory.

 

BTW, the 12 ga works for 16 ga. also.

 

If you have ever used a Lee Loader, you have pounded primers in by hand. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a Hornady hand priming tool with the afore mentioned RCBS Cowboy 12 Ga Shell holder. Both are curently available from Midway for a little over $55 total. I knock out the old primer with an ice pick, hand prime each shell with Federal Large Pistol Magnum primers while watcging TV, then add all the goodies and top them off with a parafin/beeswax mix. This has worked well for several years now. Brass BP shells are worth the trouble.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know Lee made many of their old loading kits that use the hammer method. That doesn't mean that they're safe, just inexpensive. I have never condoned the method nor used it and never will. I have been volume reloading longer than some of you have been alive. It only costs a few dollars to do it one of the safe ways mentioned in this post. Is the sight in one of your eyes not worth $50????

 

Gunstock

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wasn't trying to be smartass ( and I know how!). Even if that is the way that's "accepted" as right by some doesn't mean you should lose every lick of sense you ever had !! Remember, the lowly primer is the most dangerous reloading component we use. It can cause the loss of an eye or the use of a finger instantly. ANY method that uses a mallet or hammer to seat live primers is a method anyone who has any knowledge of reloading techniques will avoid like the plague. There have been several SAFE methods mentioned above. I suggest you adopt one of them and stay safe and healthy.

 

Gunstock

 

The method described is not my preference either, but making the statement that the poster shouldn't be reloading is far from saying that you find the method to be inherently too risky to utilize.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The brass Magtech SG shells are not consistant with the primer pocket size or the flash hole opening. Both can be tight and not the proper size.

 

I use a Lyman primer pocket tool and ream all the primer pockets to the proper dimension. I also use the Lyman flash hole tool to insure all holes are the same. I have found some flash holes very small. And some primer pockets so tight a primer will not seat with out distortion.

 

It is not surprising to hear a primer being set off on installation. :rolleyes:

 

Check for tight primer pockets, Pard. I am sure you have a few which are very tight and undersized.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.