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Colt c&b,


Slowhand Bob, 24229

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After shooting my two latest pairs of Pietta Colts enough to consider them dependable, I want to work them into a match or two next. Used to shoot Frontiersman regularly with Remingtons (used multiple cylinders) but after one or two false starts with Colt styles I gave up on them til now. The guns are the half breed offerings by Pietta, the short barrel six shot '62(.36) and the short barrel '51 in .44 and are excellent holster guns in my cut down Slim Jims. Though I have not had a failure to fire with these latest Colt clones I'm sure there are some improvements to be made for competition. I will say these are the best fitting c&b grips I have ever used for one handed shooting and could only be improved by adding checkering.

 

My first questions deal with the idea of shooting them with multiple cylinders, how practical would that be. I have always considered it to be impractical under field conditions for the Colt style but would that apply to loading at a table with plenty of room available? If practicable to load outside the gun then I figure improvements would need to be made to speed disassembly, particularly fitting the wedge for rapid removal. How are these fitted to eliminate the need for brass punches and hammers?

 

Ideas and opinions on Cap guards/Manhattan conversions would really be appreciated, are they important for dependable match function? The actions are actually not that bad with the trigger pull being good for me but just a bit on the rough side for being just right. Factory nipples are firing every time, this was Piettas biggest problem in the past for me. Any other ideas I might need to be considering?

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I would bring more than one cylinder just because the loading process takes much more elbow grease after the first dozen shots or so. I have seen some pards bring a separate loading press with a little stand that they can set up on the table. It makes the loading process much faster.

 

I also keep a pair of needlenose pliers in my pocket to help remove the wedge. The only time I've ever had to use a hammer was the first time I removed it. After that, I just push the wedge in finger-tight and use the pliers if I have trouble removing it.

 

Also, a good capping tool is a must. Keep it on a lanyard so you can replace a lost caps on the clock.

 

-Solo Sam

#91319

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Howdy

 

I have never understood the need for all those cylinders. Just remember, the more cylinders you shoot, the more cylinders you have to clean. And cleaning C&B cylinders is more of a pain than cleaning cartridge cylinders, even with Black Powder. I can maybe see it with a Remington, whose cylinder pops out so easily, but not with a Colt replica where you have to drive out the wedge and remove the barrel to change cylinders.

 

Never really understood the need for a separate loading set up either. The ram built into my 1860 Piettas has always served me fine. Never had a problem with things getting more difficult as the day went on, it always takes the same amount of elbow grease to load my 1860s.

 

I usually charge my guns at my cart with powder, wad, and ball, and then bring them over to the loading table for capping. Once you get used to it, loading a C&B revolver does not take all that much time.

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I use a cheap stand that holds the pistol upright to do my loading.

 

I use a home made lubed wad over the powder that lets me run a full 10 stages without cleaning. I will occasionally wipe the face of the cylinder if it starts to drag.

 

Fill the safety slot in the hammer with JB Weld, use TRESO nipples and #10 Remington caps and don't look back. I've had one cap fail to fire on first hammer strike this year. I went around and it fired on the second which indicates I did not do a good job of seating the cap(I use a piece of cow's horn to seat the cap).

 

If I don't draw a crowd of curious and have to explain every move I make in reloading, I will generally have my pistols loaded, shot gun belt full and rifle rounds for the next stage in hand and be ready to do posse chores in the time it takes to run 2 shooters through the stage.

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Noz has it right.

 

also IF you have problems with caps falling in the works, (thats if and you have tried different caps)

Then someone had an article in the chronicle on how to put a pin in front of the hammer to hold the caps on.

They also have it on their website. I cannot think how to spell his name.

Someone may chime in here.

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Appalachian Alan has it right that Noz has it right.

 

In addition, what Driftwood said +1.

 

I have a loading stand built onto the side of my cart. Generally park it at or near the unloading table so I can charge cylinders and man the ULT at he same time.

 

IMNSHO, the pin in the frame is more trouble than it's worth. Optimum nipple/cap combination and JB weld in the hammer slot will prevent 99.99999% of cap jams.

 

Fingers (Show Me MO smoke) McGee

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I notice you mentioned short barrels which means shorter loading levers. I find a length of PVC pipe over the loading lever provides much better leverage and makes loading easy for the short barrel C&Bs.

 

Regards,

BJT

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With my 1851's I installed Tresso nipples, filled the hammer safety slot W/ JB weld. I use Remington #11 caps. They Run smooth thru 6 stages with out pulling the Cylinders. I wipe off the cylinder faces after each stage, 50% Simple/Green and H20.

 

The lube on the cylinder Arbor is important in my opinion. I use Mobil One synthetic Grease (not the Oil). Some suggest & use Bore Butter. This might work in the cooler climates. Here in Arizona Bore Butter turns liquid very fast. I have also tried Lithium/white Lubriplate grease for an Arbor lube. The MobilOne seems to out preform the Lubriplate.

 

I use 3F APP,and no Lube or wad under or over the ball.

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Anything to speed the process is good and allows the shooter to quickly return to posse duties. We often have several silver seniors, physically challenged, etc waiting turns to man the loading/unloading tables, thus leaving Frontiersmen to their own devices!. I have both style stands, the one that acts as a cylinder ram and the one that holds the pistol, muzzle up, for conventional loading. The main reason I may end up with an extra pair of Colt cylinders is due to an anticipated set of .45 Kirst conversions. Though this would still require loading after each stage, I could do it out of the gun with the ram press, faster or easier???

 

For the time being I have several in line cappers that I used with the Remingtons and I will have to wait on that fancy TC 100 cap model fer a spell. Though those fancy Slix Stix are only $16 each, I have some 3/4" aluminum tube for ram handle extensions. I always used a Crisco mix for topping my Remington chambers and will carry that over to the Colts. On those wedges, would one just lap the bottom flat to loosen their fit? Since we never load six I guess filling the hammers safety notch would not come into play. I'm sure my first match or two will go a long ways in directing me.

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I have always shoot 51 Navies or ROA's. I have never changed cylinders on them. With a few stages under your belt you should be able to load by the time 2 mid time shooters go through a stage. If Evil Roy is up there look for 5 shooters before you are loaded. I only lighten the hammer spring some and work the timing. Shooting the right load makes a big difference on cap problems. You do not need to shoot a full cylinder load. Do use a lubed wad and make sure you have lots of lube on the cylinder arbor. Cap guards/Manhattan conversions may help some but to me it is money you don't need to spend

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