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hud

sad story

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I got a call from an Army base back east. A soldier had been killed in Iraq, and at the time had his own personal sidearm. The call was to ask if I would accept it, as the family lives in my area. We got the gun in on Friday. One whole side was covered in dried blood. Thank heavens we noticed it and cleaned it up before the parents came in. I dont know how this could have gone thru the Military, then the gunshop they took it to to send it to me, and nobody noticed it. I cant imagine what it must be like for the parents as it is, but to get something back in this condition, thats just not right. Sorry, just venting I guess

hud

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Good on you for catching it !!!!!!!

Job well done!!!!!! :FlagAm::FlagAm::FlagAm:

At least they sent it the right man.

 

BH

 

PS: There are a lot of folks in the military that haven't handled a gun since boot camp ten years ago.

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Good for you..... :FlagAm:

Years ago, when police departments would sell firearms, we would buy firearms released for sale, clean them and check them before selling them. A couple of suicide firearms came in.... uncleaned. Ultra-sonic cleaners are a great tool for these situations.

 

GOD BLESS THE FAMILY :FlagAm:-_-

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Back in 1957 I bought a 45 Colt Auto that had fired 50 rounds from the Kerrville, Texas Sheriffs department. The owner had bought the gun and a new car the same day and drove to a boys camp where his two boys were for the summer. Once there he shot both of them 49 times and saved the last round for himself where he put the gun in his mouth and killed himself. The gun was new and still had brains in the barrel when I got it. It was a sad thing.

 

Later I carried the 45 and used it myself and it never failed to do its job when I did mine right. It was a very good gun that hit where it should and never failed to feed and in the time I owned it I must have run well over 100,000 rounds thur it. It did send a number of men to hell and with the exception of the two childern they all should have gone long before. I never got over thinking about the two young boys ever time I handled the gun, May their souls rest in peace.

 

As a collector of old guns, I have found many to have blood itching on them and wonder if it came from the owner or the bad guy. If blood is left on a gun in time it will itch the metal and it is different than the one from rust.

Texas Man

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Indeed a sad story, kudos to you, Hud, for the part you have done.

 

 

 

....... wbj ..

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Hud

 

I'm sure the family would thank you, if they knew. That's the whole point.....they don't know. They may not thank you, but I do.

 

Cypress Sun

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Very strange. Never heard of this happening.

I was under the impression that personal sidearms were prohibited by all branches.

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hud, you are a straight up pard. Glad you fixed the 'situation'...

 

Take care pard and prayers for all our men and women overseas in the line of fire...

 

GG ~ :FlagAm:

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Good for you..... :FlagAm:

Years ago, when police departments would sell firearms, we would buy firearms released for sale, clean them and check them before selling them. A couple of suicide firearms came in.... uncleaned. Ultra-sonic cleaners are a great tool for these situations.

 

GOD BLESS THE FAMILY :FlagAm:-_-

===================================================

I remember many years ago, there was a murder in my hometown in which the murderer had used a .32 S&W nickel plated revolver to shoot her husband. She shot him at the kitchen table 6 times as he was eating lunch. He managed to escape and hide under the front porch. His wife reloaded, crawled under the porch after him and shot him 6 more times. Some time later, the revolver was offered at a Sheriff's sale, and Granddad bought it. It was a neat-looking piece and Granddad kept it for a while, then traded it for a 1917 parkerized Colt in .45 that used half-moon clips.

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Back in 1957 I bought a 45 Colt Auto that had fired 50 rounds from the Kerrville, Texas Sheriffs department. The owner had bought the gun and a new car the same day and drove to a boys camp where his two boys were for the summer. Once there he shot both of them 49 times and saved the last round for himself where he put the gun in his mouth and killed himself. The gun was new and still had brains in the barrel when I got it. It was a sad thing.

 

Later I carried the 45 and used it myself and it never failed to do its job when I did mine right. It was a very good gun that hit where it should and never failed to feed and in the time I owned it I must have run well over 100,000 rounds thur it. It did send a number of men to hell and with the exception of the two childern they all should have gone long before. I never got over thinking about the two young boys ever time I handled the gun, May their souls rest in peace.

 

As a collector of old guns, I have found many to have blood itching on them and wonder if it came from the owner or the bad guy. If blood is left on a gun in time it will itch the metal and it is different than the one from rust.

Texas Man

==================================================

Back when I was doing PI work, the owner of the company was a FFL who bought/sold/traded guns and was a part-time gunsmith too. One day an old guy came into the office with a .25 Italian-made semi-auto to show him. Most of the bluing on the right side had been eaten away by something, and when Roger asked about it, the guy said he had fought in Europe in WWII and had taken the pistol off a dead Italian officer who had bled on that side of it.

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Hud, vent away. But for what you did for that family, I thank you. They may never know all the men and women who helped them in their time of grief. Just know that you helped a family whose heart is torn apart and kept them from further heartache.

 

Kudos to you. :FlagAm:

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Very strange. Never heard of this happening.

I was under the impression that personal sidearms were prohibited by all branches.

That's what I though too Bob, I know none of my sons could take anything over to Iraq with them, maybe they changed things.

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That's what I though too Bob, I know none of my sons could take anything over to Iraq with them, maybe they changed things.

I dont know anything about all that, I only put this on here as it was bothering me that the gun was not cleaned up. Maybe I am taking this wrong, but it sounds sort of like I am being accused of something. Sorry now that I brought it up

hud

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I think you're misreading this, Hud. I don't think anyone means to say anything negative about you, and you sure as hell don't owe anyone an apology nor any further explanation. What you did was right and in the best interests of the family. You done good, pal, and I'll shake your hand any day. 'Nuff said.

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I think you're misreading this, Hud. I don't think anyone means to say anything negative about you, and you sure as hell don't owe anyone an apology nor any further explanation. What you did was right and in the best interests of the family. You done good, pal, and I'll shake your hand any day. 'Nuff said.

PLUS 1

 

RRR

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I dont know anything about all that, I only put this on here as it was bothering me that the gun was not cleaned up. Maybe I am taking this wrong, but it sounds sort of like I am being accused of something. Sorry now that I brought it up

hud

Your not being accused of anything' just Bob and I have heard they could not take personal weapons that's all

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I dont know anything about all that, I only put this on here as it was bothering me that the gun was not cleaned up. Maybe I am taking this wrong, but it sounds sort of like I am being accused of something. Sorry now that I brought it up

hud

Hud,

 

No! No! No! I read them all before replying. They were all kudos and passing comments about their experiences.

 

You did a good thing!

 

:wub:

 

Allie

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You did the right thing Hud. Thanks for sharing this info.

 

It's possible that this soldier was an officer which might help explain why he was able to have his personal pistol.

 

Nonetheless, it happens. Ya dun good!

 

 

..........Widder

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First off, my hat's off to you Hud.....you did the right and "human" thing. Good job!

 

 

That's what I though too Bob, I know none of my sons could take anything over to Iraq with them, maybe they changed things.

 

My experience with personal weapons in a combat zone was a big "negative." I don't have it handy, but I'm fairly certain that personal weapons are against regulations. That said, there's several who did take personal weapons to a combat zone. Whether you get dinged about it is another issue which depends upon your chain of command. Firearms would be one thing while personal knives probably wouldn't even raise an eyebrow.

 

Just thinking out loud here, but just remember that the Geneva Convention disallows the use of stuff like hollow point ammunition. The presence of a personal firearm, to me at least, would run the risk of violating that.

 

Chick

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I think you're misreading this, Hud. I don't think anyone means to say anything negative about you, and you sure as hell don't owe anyone an apology nor any further explanation. What you did was right and in the best interests of the family. You done good, pal, and I'll shake your hand any day. 'Nuff said.

 

+2

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Hud,

 

Don’t worry about it, you said what you thought was important and it was. This type of oversight continues in bureaucracies, including the military, to this day. What some have pointed out has been official policy since 1965 when I first enlisted. The operative phrase is “official policy”. That has not stopped many from carrying personal firearms overseas.

 

It kept me from bringing one to Vietnam but did not stop me in the 1980s in Central America. I would rather be tried by twelve than carried by six… I have always had problems with “command” not trusting us with firearms and believe me they really still don’t. I did get into a couple tight spots with my sidearm but it did work out, I am still alive and did manage to retire with 29 years of service, six active and 23 reserve.

 

I have a good friend who is an E-6 Weapons Sergeant in one our US Army Special Forces Groups today, he brings his personal weapons or components with him when deployed overseas. He does not like the issued pistol or long barreled rifles for the tasks he has been presented. Could he get in trouble I suppose he could, based on the high CS level that our warriors now have to contend with. Would the military return personal property, I suspect that they would.

 

Your scenario makes perfect sense to me based on my past experiences and knowledge of current activities by some of our military deployed overseas. Many folks strictly follow regulations and live to tell about it and others don’t. Some would rather be tried by twelve and have a better chance of living to tell about it. Life is about choices…

 

What you have pointed out is truly sad. Fortunately, you were able to help salvage what would have been a true travesty. Thank you…

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Jeff,

I think you're misreading things. What you did was 100% right and a genuine act of compassion. If the family knew about it, they would thank you. Since they probably won't ever know, I'd like to thank you for them. Anyone want to know what the Cowboy Way is....re-read Jeff's original post.

 

Good on you, Jeff.

 

IROT

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Many things are done in a war zone that do not involve official sanction. The 1911 is highly prized in the sandbox and the 9mm Beretta disdained. Warriors there will go to great lengths to exchange one for the other.

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.

Thank you, Hud.

 

You're the one bright spot in this tragedy.

 

You should be proud of what you've done. We're certainly proud of you.

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I got a call from an Army base back east. A soldier had been killed in Iraq, and at the time had his own personal sidearm. The call was to ask if I would accept it, as the family lives in my area. We got the gun in on Friday. One whole side was covered in dried blood. Thank heavens we noticed it and cleaned it up before the parents came in. I dont know how this could have gone thru the Military, then the gunshop they took it to to send it to me, and nobody noticed it. I cant imagine what it must be like for the parents as it is, but to get something back in this condition, thats just not right. Sorry, just venting I guess

hud

I am PROUD to call you friend.....

 

You done a good thing,

 

JJJ-D

:ph34r: :ph34r:

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Very strange. Never heard of this happening.

I was under the impression that personal sidearms were prohibited by all branches.

It is not common knowledge, but any unit commander can authorize personal sidearms. It is extremely rare to find one who will consider doing so, or who is even aware they can. Most of the non-issue arms in theater were either found in-country or brought in without authorization, which is not easy but not particularly difficult either. Getting them back home is virtually impossible, so they are often passed from unit to unit.

 

Or so I've heard.

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Hud,

 

Oversights continue in the military on a daily basis. I can't even imagine the impact this would have had on a parents worst nightmare if you hadn't noticed.

 

As the parents of a career soldier, Lucky and I thank you from the bottom of our hearts. Your actions have opened the door for honor to replace what would have surely been a lifetime of additional grief and suffering. The sidearm came to you for a reason.........thanks!

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Hud you did the right thing. I know service men carry private weapons, because I did myself. I cannot speak for Army, but as an aviator it was required when aloft to wear what was called an SV-1 vest back in my day. This vest had many pockets and devices built right into it. A lot of time was spent knowing what pocket had what in it as issued. It was part of the quals for aircrew and you had to pass tests on it, including locating everything in the dark/blindfolded. This equipment was issued by the parachute loft and so was a S&W model 10 .38 spl with about a 6 inch barrel and wood checkered grips. This was goverment property and you carried it in the left inside pocket built for that on the SV-1. Vest, pickle suits, helmet, nomex gloves and sparkless boondockers was kept in a locker assigned to you and overseen by the parachute loft. I should say that you had to qualify with the model 10 also, but if you did well and obtained expert, then you were awarded a medal. Whew, this story is getting long and probably best around a campfire. Anyway, I shot past marksman and obtained sharpshooter in training. Nice, but that is a ribbon and not a medal. I figured I would never make it past that with the piece of junk that was issued to me and so my wife and I went to a Ventura gunshop ( I was stationed at VP0919 at Pt. Mugu at the time ) I bought a 4 inch S&W, either a model 15 or 16 .38spl and it had small frame wood checkered grips, but I bought a packmeyer rubber target grip for it. This was a chunk of change in the early 70s. I think $300+. Pt Mugu has their own range down by the beach and I went on down there and tried the thing out. The ordinance men that ran the range also would grade you if you wanted to shoot for score. They also provided ammo. They were very interested in me and my new purchase. I spent a half day there at the range and finally I shot it for score and made expert,even with the shorter barrel it was so much more accurate that I just couldn't help but do so much better. Whew, sorry about the length of this tale, but old age does make you dwell on memories. So, my crew was crew 7, the skippers crew, ie the commander of my unit and himself a commander in rank. Enlisted (me) and officers (them) do not fraternize. However, a crew of 11 on a P-3 aircraft get to know each other well. I had related to the skipper the whole tale of the purchase and how proud I was to make expert and that he would be presenting me a medal in front of formation and all that stuff. He asked if I was going to carry it and I had told him I did not think I could as non issued gear. Well, he told me that he carried his own weapon himself as he took survival seriously and issued me what is called a chit to carry it. So, I turned in my model 10 and got the serial number of it removed from issued equipment and they put my own personal weapon down as mine and when they inspected or had inspection of lockers, the revolver would be correct for my gear. So, definitely you can carry your own weapon in your SV-1, but in the Navy you could not parade around with it or any other weapon unless you were qualified to do so and mostly that was on base MAs or master at arms personnel or you were on guard duty. I carried my own revolver, that my son now has, for the rest of my tenure of about 8 years and there was no problem when all my stuff in my service jacket was transferred to VP-91 at Moffett Field, when I had a PCS move there. Sorry folks.

Anyway Hud, you were so right to clean that weapon up. I always hoped on each mission I would make it back, but if not, I would sure want it to be someone like you giving my family my carried weapon that was my own property.

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I'm sorry if you thought I was being critical. That was certainly not my intent.

It is just a very unusual occurrence. Unusual that a personal weapon was carried and even more unusual that it was sent to the family. Whoever sent it screwed up, not you. You did the right thing. I can't imagine the hurt it would have caused the family.

 

Personally I would contact the sender or the commanding officer and let him know that was a classless thing to do. Somebody should get reamed.

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Hud did the right thing. Sounds like a stand up guy.

I spent 14 months in Iraq as an Army soldier, and no personal weapons were allowed. I'm thinking this weapon may have been a Personally Owned Weapon (POW) at his home station, usually these are stored in quarters or, for single solders, the unit arms room. In which case it would be returned legally to the next of kin. About the blood if that's what it was, I can only speculate.

 

Here is the policy in the link below, NO local or subordinate commander can superceed this, and it is still in force, believe me it was taken seriously. I even stood inspection to make sure my basic load was Army issued ammunition. No civvy hollow points or other ammo was allowed. POW and non issue ammo would be contraband and immediately confiscated. It aint WW II or even Viet Nam when such things were allowed, or I sure as heck would have had one :(

 

www.tac.usace.army.mil/deploymentcenter/.../GO-1B%20Policy.pdf

 

May have to cut and paste this into a browser.

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Hud ....it came to you that way so someone with the know how and caring would clean that man's personal item........good on you!!!

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