Jump to content
SASS Wire Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Zachariah Smith 70528

Parker Bros. 10 Ga Shotgun

Recommended Posts

Just bought a Parkers Bros. hammered double barreled 10 ga. (ser# 18XX1) Marked D 6 on the flats with nice engraving. The barrel opening lever is underneath the flats ahead of the trigger guard. Looks to have been made in the year of our Lord18 and 81-note the palindrome. For having been around 130 years it’s in good shape with some pitting in the bores. Weights 9 pounds per my scale. The hammers are not easy to cock. One firing pin does not work. It has been worth the price so far just to research it’s history. Sale tag said 12ga. and sold as a wall hanger.

 

I have been trying to join: "Parker Gun Collectors Association" but all I get back is permission denied as they don’t allow spammers like me. Tried to email them to correct the error to no avail.

 

 

I am now thinking of using this gun with black powder after having it repaired and inspected. I am even thinking it would be great to have two 44-40 original Colts and an original 66 or 73. It would cost so much to do this that it is out of my reach. My first born son is out of the question but my x-wife is a thought(:

 

I’m wondering how to clean the gun without doing any damage? Any recommendations as to a Parker Bros. gunsmith in the Portland, Oregon area?

 

Also, any ideas on how to join Parker Gun Collectors Association?

 

Thanks,

 

Zach.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guess you missed the Register button on the main page to get onto the forum ... http://www.parkerguns.org/forums/register.php

 

Cleaning the Parker: Clean it like any other shotgun you own. Might also want to run a SS spiral bore brush down the tubes. As for the pits - they will be there for a long time to come

 

As for the quality of the Damascus barrels, there is only one way to determine if the wraps are still together and no pin holes. That's doing a non destructive dielectric test on it for inclusions between the twist wraps and pin holes. Gunsmiths who do this are about as scarce as hens teeth. The 'poor man's' way is to wrap the barrels with masking tape, then fire using several black powder rounds, with the gun strapped tightly on a rest and a nice LONG rope. Any pinholes or inclusions will leave a mark on the tape. Not perfect and no guarantee but a good place to start.

(This last advice is offered with NO GUARANTEES that the tubes are in shooting condition and won't later be a safety factor)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guess you missed the Register button on the main page to get onto the forum ... http://www.parkerguns.org/forums/register.php

 

Cleaning the Parker: Clean it like any other shotgun you own. Might also want to run a SS spiral bore brush down the tubes. As for the pits - they will be there for a long time to come

 

As for the quality of the Damascus barrels, there is only one way to determine if the wraps are still together and no pin holes. That's doing a non destructive dielectric test on it for inclusions between the twist wraps and pin holes. Gunsmiths who do this are about as scarce as hens teeth. The 'poor man's' way is to wrap the barrels with masking tape, then fire using several black powder rounds, with the gun strapped tightly on a rest and a nice LONG rope. Any pinholes or inclusions will leave a mark on the tape. Not perfect and no guarantee but a good place to start.

(This last advice is offered with NO GUARANTEES that the tubes are in shooting condition and won't later be a safety factor)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

John Boy,

 

Thank you for your suggestions. I opened the site following your instruction and again got back is message:

 

Registration denied, this forum runs an active policy of not allowing spammers. Please contact us via the "Contact Us" page link if you believe this is in error.

 

I did contact them three days ago but have not heard from them.

 

Zach.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I did contact them three days ago but have not heard from them.

Patience, high paying ;) Volunteers usually are the Administrators of forums

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Might take a while for the PGCA to reply to your email, but you should hear from them eventually.

 

You might want to contact Kirk Merrington in Kerrville, TX. Kirk does excellent work and is very knowledgeable about damascus barrels. http://www.kirkmerrington.net

 

I've had him work on a couple of my Parkers with great results, he's also a nice guy.

 

GIT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If $$ is not an issue, you could always have Briley make a set of titanium tubes. These are temporary inserts and reduce the gage to 12 or 16. They are commonly used in skeet guns. The titanium is tougher than most modern steels and much stronger than the original damascus. I expect the costs would run in the $500-1000 range.

Original '66s are rimfire only. Shooter grade guns can be found for $4000 and up, but the .44 rimfire ammo is very rare and costly. If I could find one, I would have a new bolt/firing pin made in centerfire (not converting the existing bolt) and shoot .44 Russians (BP only) in the gun.

Original '73s can be found in shooter grade for $1250 and up. They are great guns but should not be run at full speed. Very good gun can be found for $1750 and up if in .32 WCF or .38 WCF. Guns in .44 WCF bring more money.

Original '92s are even better bargains and work much better than replicas. The gun was designed to cyce bottleneck cartridges; the straight-wall cartrtidges are a challenge, even though I still like to shoot them.

First gen Colt start around $1500 for refinished guns and $2500 for no-finish guns.

I did this but gave up on the Colts. The Colts have been shot since they were made and were in poor condition. The rifles were often put away since more powerful cartridges like the .30-30 and .30-06 were so much better for hunting. I have found very good deals on Winchesters so far and enjoy shooting them at monthly matches.

This is a fun part of shooting cowboy that most shooters miss out on. I am okay with that. If more weekend cowboys were looking for these guns, it would drive up the prices.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If $$ is not an issue, you could always have Briley make a set of titanium tubes. These are temporary inserts and reduce the gage to 12 or 16. They are commonly used in skeet guns. The titanium is tougher than most modern steels and much stronger than the original damascus. I expect the costs would run in the $500-1000 range.

Original '66s are rimfire only. Shooter grade guns can be found for $4000 and up, but the .44 rimfire ammo is very rare and costly. If I could find one, I would have a new bolt/firing pin made in centerfire (not converting the existing bolt) and shoot .44 Russians (BP only) in the gun.

Original '73s can be found in shooter grade for $1250 and up. They are great guns but should not be run at full speed. Very good gun can be found for $1750 and up if in .32 WCF or .38 WCF. Guns in .44 WCF bring more money.

Original '92s are even better bargains and work much better than replicas. The gun was designed to cyce bottleneck cartridges; the straight-wall cartrtidges are a challenge, even though I still like to shoot them.

First gen Colt start around $1500 for refinished guns and $2500 for no-finish guns.

I did this but gave up on the Colts. The Colts have been shot since they were made and were in poor condition. The rifles were often put away since more powerful cartridges like the .30-30 and .30-06 were so much better for hunting. I have found very good deals on Winchesters so far and enjoy shooting them at monthly matches.

This is a fun part of shooting cowboy that most shooters miss out on. I am okay with that. If more weekend cowboys were looking for these guns, it would drive up the prices.

 

Tom Bullweed,

 

Thank you for the information. I think I’ll stay with my Rugers and 38 Spc. 66. I may have to try the 10ga. once or twice just to get in touch a with gun that is 130 years old-that’s 60 years older I am.

 

Zach.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.