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Cheyenne Culpepper 32827

shooting from enclosures, lead exposure,

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After finding I have a slightly elevated blood level of 22 I did a lil reading. Seems inhalation in a major source of the culprit. I do run the timer a lot, but it would seem shooting from an enclosed area would enhance the chance of inhaling a greater amount.

 

Perhaps not building props that are enclosed isn't such a good idea?

 

and yes, I am going to start wearing gloves when reloading, I think I'll get the stainless steel media that you use with soapy water too.

 

anyone seen those lil filters that cover each individual nostril? Saw them on "shark tank", ?

 

Cheyenne

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Afternoon Cheyenne:

nose filters

Hope all is well with you & yer girls.

--Dawg

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wow this will go on for a lot of pages

 

I get checked every year, its a great idea

 

my nose hairs seem to be collecting it correctly, and dispersing it well LOL-LOL

I call em industrial boooogers

 

my lead levels are ok, even with reloading, and casting lead

 

I dont time much, to deaf to hear squibbbbs

 

I have found that pro-gun doctors

and anti gun doctors, feel differently bout lead levels

 

pro gunners more apt to take the time to explain, before just telling ya to STOP-SHOOTIN

 

i NOW HAVE, a pro gun doc

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Ya aint going to live forever..

 

I would have to see the study of what comes directly from a fired gun with the barrel sticking out the window, etc.

 

Reloading and not washing hands before eating or picking your nose is probably a bigger problem.

Also, when I was looking at an issue like this, I found that there was more lead exposure in the mini blinds that I had on my house windows. In the trash they went.

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Ya aint going to live forever..

 

I would have to see the study of what comes directly from a fired gun with the barrel sticking out the window, etc.

 

Reloading and not washing hands before eating or picking your nose is probably a bigger problem.

Also, when I was looking at an issue like this, I found that there was more lead exposure in the mini blinds that I had on my house windows. In the trash they went.

 

you sound like you have educated yerownself on the matter

a tip of the hat to you sir

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Hey Cheyenne

 

I am very interested to see where this thread goes. I'm have a similar situation. I would think it is obvious that shooting from an enclosed (roof, walls/berms, limited entry point) area would add to the inhalation level of lead, but I'm no expert. I would also suspect the resetting of targets at the "back of the cave" detrimental also due to the dust, smoke and vaporized lead.

 

A guy I shoot with, has extremely high lead levels. His doctor told him that timing was one of the worst things for this type of elevated blood lead levels. I hope he replies to this thread so that others can benefit from his experiences even though they are bad experiences.

 

Good Luck

Cypress Sun

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may I recomend that all shooters have their lead levels checked each year, that a way

ya know, if things change

mine dropped the 1st year do to me learning

and have maintained a healty level ever cents

that over a decade -- now -- of testing and shooting, and loading and casting for CAS

 

then may I also recomend:::: that they do research:::: on their own about what they are told

 

it is a political issue

so please dont fall for politics

we all want to be healthy for as long as we can

 

be smart - bee safe

learn from more than just a CAS posting (please)

 

the feller that started this post is a great guy

I have shot with him plenty

good luck with your levels

 

aside from lead

perm stage facades are limiting at best

goods and bads

shade

protection from rain

splatter stop

 

harder on counters

lead?

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One of our pards had elevated levels of lead (low 20's). So he was very careful, used gloves while reloading, etc. Then when checked, his levels went up to the low 30's!!!

 

Certainly, wash your hands, but the primary concern for us is breathing it in. The major source is either spent primers or actual shooting such as at an indoor range. If there is reasonable ventilation, the shooting is not usually a problem.

 

The biggest problem we found with our pard was cleaning the brass. When you separate the brass from the media, a lot of lead dust can fly.

So do NOT use one of those nead separators that would throw out a lot of dust.

 

It is best to do that outside with a breeze.

 

I also pour the media into a simple bowl type separator while the bowl is inside a plastic bag.

Then I step away for a few seconds to allow the dust to settle (sort of like when a truck passes on a gravel road).

Then I step up, close the plastic bag and start shaking to separate the brass.

Then open the bag and step away. Then I sort the brass.

 

A mask would also be helpful, as long as it fits properly.

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Heres the facts.

 

1. Had my level tested in Dec 2010, after hearing of other with high lead levels. Came back at a 15.

2. Started shooting at an indoor range 2-3 times a week in late dec 2010

3. Got Sick Mar 2011 with Headaches, abdominal pain, muscle fatigue, vomiting, and diahrea. thought it was a virus, but had levels checked again. This time 41.5

4. Was told I had lead toxicity and to remove myself from exposure and Dr. considered chelation therapy to remove the heavy metal, but opted to let my body naturaly pass the lead.

5. Retested 2 weeks later, 33.4

6. Retested the other day, approx a month and a half , 23.5

 

I was not exposed in a work enviroment and it was not in the water. I had shot cowboy and reloaded for 5 years prior to the first test that came back at 15.

 

A fellow I shot with at the range tested high also, a 38. He dont shoot cowboy. Others from that range have tested high, nut I dont have thier numbers. I have done a lot of research on the matter and decided to not shoot at indoor ranges, wash hands well after touching lead or shooting. Wear gloves and mask when handling target or cleaning brass because of the lead dust. Change clothes when done at the range because of the lead residue, this was also told to us a the combat arms range in the military. Most Docs that I have spoke to didnt think a 15 was too bad due to my shooting lifestyle.

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Would it help to change your alias??? :D :D

 

Glad you have gotten it lower.

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Would it help to change your alias??? :D :D

 

Glad you have gotten it lower.

 

I've thought bout that, yet the alias seems to fit now. Giving myself lead poison wasn't what I had in mind though.

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Dump some paint swirl remover from the auto parts store in your tumbling media. Not only will the brass be shinier but it will reduce the dust and thus the airborne lead. This change alone reduced my level from 13 to 8. I cast all my own bullets so I am at more risk, so I am extra careful.

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A guy I shoot with, has extremely high lead levels. His doctor told him that timing was one of the worst things for this type of elevated blood lead levels. I hope he replies to this thread so that others can benefit from his experiences even though they are bad experiences.

 

Good Luck

Cypress Sun

 

Ok, I have been "outted". Sun knows that I test at 34.5 about eight weeks ago. I was not showing any signs but I asked to be tested "just in case". Now, it's important to know that depending upon the Doc you talk to, anything over 10 is worrisome, but really it depends upon the person. Lead gets stored by the body because it really doesn't know what to do with it. It ends up in the liver, kidneys, and bone. It can get into other places like the spinal fluid which is not good at all. I didn't want to just wait and see, so there were two paths for me to take. I chose Chelation Theropy.

 

The clinic I go to specializes in this kind of treatment so they weren't satisfied with just a blood level reading. They performed a whole battery of tests including urine and fecal testing (Oh, what fun!) so they could determine how much lead was in my whole body and not just my blood. Let's just say that my level was literally off the chart so I started Chelation Theropy after a manditory nutrition class. Chelation Theropy uses an enzyme called EDTA which is introduced via I.V.. I go twice per week where they inject me with this enzyme. EDTA attaches itself to heavy metal of any kind, and lead being the heaviest is usually the first one it seeks out. After it attaches itself to that molecule, the body reads it as a fat molecule and takes it to the intestines to be excreted. I will need 20 treatments and then I will be retested. I will post the results when I get them.

 

Just as background, I have shot in an indoor range for 13 years but I have been competing in one form of shooting or another for about 20 years.

 

I now have five new high volume fans installed in my range. The smoke dissapears as soon as I pull the trigger. I wear gloves when I clean guns and a respirator when I work with brass. I don't run the timer anymore and I try not to get too close to the firing line so if I spot I spot from a distance. In general I am more aware of lead contact and try to avoid it or minimize it.

 

I would be willing to think that a lot of us have this condition, but folks sometime don't want to know so they don't get tested. This is not the AIDS virus, it's lead and it can be treated so GET TESTED!

 

I will keep everyone posted.

 

Dang It Dan

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Ok, I have been "outted". Sun knows that I test at 34.5 about eight weeks ago. I was not showing any signs but I asked to be tested "just in case". Now, it's important to know that depending upon the Doc you talk to, anything over 10 is worrisome, but really it depends upon the person. Lead gets stored by the body because it really doesn't know what to do with it. It ends up in the liver, kidneys, and bone. It can get into other places like the spinal fluid which is not good at all. I didn't want to just wait and see, so there were two paths for me to take. I chose Chelation Theropy.

 

The clinic I go to specializes in this kind of treatment so they weren't satisfied with just a blood level reading. They performed a whole battery of tests including urine and fecal testing (Oh, what fun!) so they could determine how much lead was in my whole body and not just my blood. Let's just say that my level was literally off the chart so I started Chelation Theropy after a manditory nutrition class. Chelation Theropy uses an enzyme called EDTA which is introduced via I.V.. I go twice per week where they inject me with this enzyme. EDTA attaches itself to heavy metal of any kind, and lead being the heaviest is usually the first one it seeks out. After it attaches itself to that molecule, the body reads it as a fat molecule and takes it to the intestines to be excreted. I will need 20 treatments and then I will be retested. I will post the results when I get them.

 

Just as background, I have shot in an indoor range for 13 years but I have been competing in one form of shooting or another for about 20 years.

 

I now have five new high volume fans installed in my range. The smoke dissapears as soon as I pull the trigger. I wear gloves when I clean guns and a respirator when I work with brass. I don't run the timer anymore and I try not to get too close to the firing line so if I spot I spot from a distance. In general I am more aware of lead contact and try to avoid it or minimize it.

 

I would be willing to think that a lot of us have this condition, but folks sometime don't want to know so they don't get tested. This is not the AIDS virus, it's lead and it can be treated so GET TESTED!

 

I will keep everyone posted.

 

Dang It Dan

 

Dan,

 

I didn't mention your name, but I'm real glad you did. Hopefully your knowledge and information will serve as a wake up call to many others in the same boat. I'd bet there is alot more of us with elevated lead levels that just don't know it because they have never been tested or just don't want to know. Like Dan said, get tested.

 

C.S.

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