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An apology in advance


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On another forum I got called out for being a little "rough" on somebody today. I apologized and we went on. I really value my place here on the WIRE, so I'm gonna apologize in advance for any snotty, snippy, intolerant, or otherwise mean replies I might author in the next several weeks.

 

Ya see, last Friday I went to see the friendly neighborhood plumber (urologist), for a little peekaboo with his magic wand. I'd had blood in my urine, but fully expected he'd say I had prostatitis or some other "itis" and give me a prescription. Nope. He aborted his ogling of my insides after less than a minute, said "damn. I didn't expect to find that" and removed his handy wand and said "you've got a tumor in your bladder. It looks small, likely a low grade cancer, but we won't know for sure until we get it out of there." Surgery is scheduled for 4/26.

 

To say this has caused a whole range of responses, emotions, re-defining what is "normal", and so on would be an understatement. Consequently, I have a very, very low "bull (stuff)" tolerance just now, and might tend to bite rather than contemplate a response if irritated.

 

I apologize in advance if I get a little rough. This waiting and not knowing exactly what is the nature of this beast inside me called "cancer" is not easy. I can't make the next month evaporate...... It's probably gonna be OK, likely removed in it's entirity, etc. if not, stuff gets ugly in a hurry trying to fight it. I need to know where I am at..... So if I'm a little testy, please endeavor to endure.

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That's alright, Jack. You get some leeway for that, and also for being so forthright.

 

I certainly do wish you the best with it, and I hope it'll all turn out just fine.

 

And if you like, we can take a test run at the testiness: Go ahead, now, in this thread, and scare my horse, and I'll respond and say, "Aw, shucks, Jack. That's alright." :lol:

 

I'll be good practice for both of us.

 

But really, I had a breast cancer scare, once, and Painless has been quite ill for a long time. So, you're right, these kinds of things can really add a new dimension to how you interact with others.

 

Aw, shucks: You go ahead and scare both my horses. I'll give you a freeby right now on them.

 

Aunt Jen

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Jack, partner it's in God's hands now and I'm praying that He'll see you through this fit as a fiddle. Guiding the doctors moves the whole way, through the surgery (if that's what's needed) to deciding treatments. You hang in there cuz God ain't done with you yet. Smithy.

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Kick its butt!

I hate the Big-C.

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Jack,

 

You're amongst friends here, never apologize. Prayers up for the Physicians and may God blast this cancer with both barrels!

 

BSD

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Jack,

 

From my experience (prostate), if they're willing to wait a month before taking it out, then they're not too concerned. In my case, the cancer was confirmed and they wanted to schedule me for the next week. My response, irrational as it might seem, was to insist they wait another three weeks until I got back from Key West (I'd been promising myself a vacation for months, and *nothing* was going to make me give it up). After surgery, I peed my pants a lot and wore a diaper for three months or so, but I've been fine ever since.

 

So, *try* to put it out of your mind, find something relaxing to do, and just kick back.

 

And good luck.

 

PS: Again from experience, when they let you get out of bed, remember to unfasten the catheter from the bed frame before you stand up.

 

 

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Jack,

 

You're amongst friends here, never apologize. Prayers up for the Physicians and may God blast this cancer with both barrels!

 

BSD

 

 

My feelings too...prayers AJ.

 

GG ~ :FlagAm:

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Jack

Kick Ass Mule here we have talked a few times over the years and I make a point to read your messages. I know what your going through am there myself and more surgery scheduled for the 11th. The waiting for results is the worst expierence I have had to face in 66 years, but you get through it and go on. Finding it early is a God send. Hang in and you have a licence to be PISSY for the next while and we are going to very tolerent of you in your challenge.

 

Now as I was recuperating from extensive surgery to remove large and deep tumour on my back the Doc decided he did not like large spot just to the left along my hair line just aft of left eye, so a couple of needle jabs and whip snip and cut, off it was. Now here we are, back sore as catching your self in a new pair of jeans zipper, now face stinging like hell!!!!! But I'm a cowboy and the wifes words of comfort" suck it up buttercup", ringing in my ears, I lay down to nap and as I approach that that point of sleep where you are sliding off to sleep my left eye pops open surgeon had stiched me up too tight, Damm 2 days sleeping looking like a pirate, and each morning getting the tape off ouch. But all in all funny yes!!!!

Jack my very best hope for your results and speedy recovery. KA Mule

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A.Jack-

Do what you need to, never mind us- we owe ya some latitude on this, to say the least. My wife and I shall pray for your recovery,and for the guidance of your Physicians.

Best,

Conestoga Smith and Cincinnati Red

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Jack, you do what you need to. We'll side ya' anyhow.

 

Get well soon 'n' keep a good thought.

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AJ:

 

my good friend, I hate to hear of this health issue. I have experienced similar situations these past few years and everything turned out fine.

 

A few years back, the Doc checks my arm pits and says...."hut Ohhhhh"!

 

I said: 'what do you mean, HUT OOOOOHHHHH"

 

I had 3 swollen lymph nodes and he immediately says it could be the big 'C'. (He actually said cancer)

 

So I go to the specialist and he says the same thing.

"We got to go in there and check it out".

 

For about 10 days, I worried meowndangself sick. Then surgery came. Then the results came.

I had 3 nodes totally destroyed by an infection probably caused by a tick bite.

 

Whewwwwww, what a relief.

 

Just wanted to share how sometimes, our health issues turn out o.k.

 

I'll say a little prayer for comfort and healing for you and hope everything turns out fine.

 

Take care of yourself and thanks for sharing this info with your Wire Pards.

 

Keep in touch!

 

 

..........Widder

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Hey Jack... tough news for sure and but for the grace of God go us all. May Grace be with you. My prayers for your speedy cure and recovery.

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AJ - your replies & posts are direct and not born out of a sense of meanness, smart-assedness, or any other negativeness. No need to apologize.

 

The words "small" and "low grade" are encouraging. You'll be fine Pard.

 

If I can inject a little levity here, when I worked in Toledo we had a urologist who was a regular guest on the medical segment of a show we did.

 

His name: Dr. Dick Tapper.

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AJ,

 

You are one of the handful or so of members who I always read if I see your name on a thread. That ain't likely to change. Good fortune to you and feel free to vent to your friends.

 

Very Best Regards,

BJT

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Jack, I wint thru the same thing a bunch of yrs ago, mine turnt owt tu b a shadow...., it was rite aftur my brothur had passed of renal cancer.

 

about the apology part,,,,,yu piss me off! there, now we're past et.....sometimes I wud like to "tell it like it is" and have once in a while....

 

One thing I have learnt, some of the folk I thot were PIAs on the wire are actually grate folk once I met em...puts it awl in perspective...

 

Feeling yur pain,

 

Cheyenne

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As Cap'n Cahill said so well, "your replies & posts are direct and not born out of a sense of meanness, smart-assedness, or any other negativeness."

 

Jack, if you need to vent, or yell, or get nasty at someone, shoot a PM or email at me.

 

 

 

O holy Father, heavenly Physician of our souls and bodies, who hast sent thine Only-begotten Son our Lord Jesus Christ to heal all our ailments and deliver us from death: do thou visit and heal thy servant, Jack, granting him release from pain and restoration to health and vigor, that he may give thanks unto thee and bless thy holy Name, of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit: now and ever, and unto ages of ages. Amen.

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As Cap'n Cahill said so well, "your replies & posts are direct and not born out of a sense of meanness, smart-assedness, or any other negativeness."

 

Jack, if you need to vent, or yell, or get nasty at someone, shoot a PM or email at me.

 

 

 

O holy Father, heavenly Physician of our souls and bodies, who hast sent thine Only-begotten Son our Lord Jesus Christ to heal all our ailments and deliver us from death: do thou visit and heal thy servant, Jack, granting him release from pain and restoration to health and vigor, that he may give thanks unto thee and bless thy holy Name, of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit: now and ever, and unto ages of ages. Amen.

 

 

I can no way say it better than Subdeacon Joe. :excl: You stand tall with us. I will be sending smoke signals upstairs in April with those .45 SP cartridges you designed for us. :ph34r: Get well ASAP. :)

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AJ, here is a handout I gave to my patients. This was last updated in February, 2011, so it is current. I’m sure sorry to hear the news. Look over the handout. I’m happy to answer any questions. Oftentimes docs don’t answer their patients clearly, or all the patient hears is the word ‘cancer’ and everything else is blanked out.

 

Okie

 

BLADDER CANCER OVERVIEW — The optimal treatment for urothelial bladder cancer depends upon the cancer's stage and grade.

• Approximately 70 percent of all new cases of bladder cancer are classified as non-muscle invasive, also called superficial bladder cancer. The initial treatment for this stage of bladder cancer is surgical removal of the tumor through a cystoscope (called TURBT). This is often followed by adjuvant (additional) therapy, which reduces the chances of the cancer recurring. (See 'Transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT)' below.) Of these, approximately 20 to 25 percent of initially non-muscle invasive cancers will progress to invasive types during the person's lifetime.

• The remaining 30 percent of bladder cancers are muscle invasive, and generally require surgery to remove the bladder (cystectomy) and the surrounding organs. (See "Patient information: Bladder cancer treatment; invasive cancer".) This article has facts about the treatment of non-muscle invasive urothelial bladder cancer. The diagnosis and staging of bladder cancer are discussed separately.

 

INITIAL BLADDER CANCER TREATMENT — The most common first treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer is surgery to remove any abnormal appearing areas inside the bladder; this is called transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT). Transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) — Transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) is a procedure in which a physician uses a cystoscope to see inside the bladder and remove any abnormal-appearing areas. A cystoscope is a long thin tube that contains a light and a camera. In most cases, this procedure is done in an operating room while the person is under anesthesia. After the procedure, you can usually go home, sometimes with a catheter for a few days. In certain cases, usually in people with more aggressive microinvasive cancers, a second TURBT will be performed several weeks after the first to be sure that no tumor was missed during the original cystoscopy. If there are new areas that appear abnormal, they will be removed. If there are no new abnormal-appearing areas, you will begin adjuvant therapy.

 

ADJUVANT BLADDER CANCER THERAPY — Even in people who have their bladder tumor completely removed with TURBT, up to 50 percent of people will have a recurrence of their cancer within 12 months. Because of this high recurrence rate, adjuvant (additional) therapy is usually recommended. The type of adjuvant therapy recommended depends upon your risk of recurrence:

• Some people who are at low risk of recurrence will be advised to have a single dose of intravesical chemotherapy at the time of the initial TURBT. "Intravesical" means that the treatment is put inside of the bladder, usually through a catheter (a flexible tube passed through the urethra, where urine exits). This allows a high concentration of the treatment to be applied directly to the areas where tumor cells could remain, potentially destroying these cells and preventing them from reemerging in the bladder and forming new tumors.

• Some people who are at intermediate risk of recurrence will be advised to have either a full six-week course of intravesical chemotherapy, most commonly mitomycin, or intravesical immunotherapy with BCG.

• People at high risk of recurrence or worsening will be advised to start intravesical BCG, usually within two to six weeks of the first treatment. This is most commonly followed by additional booster treatments (maintenance therapy) once a complete response is obtained. Occasionally, however, patients are advised to consider bladder removal (cystectomy) especially if the disease is extensive. Intravesical chemotherapy — Chemotherapy refers to the use of medicines to stop or slow the growth of cancer cells. The most commonly used intravesical chemotherapy for bladder cancer is mitomycin. This is put inside the bladder in one of two ways:

• One regimen involves giving the mitomycin once, immediately after TURBT. The solution is left in the bladder for 30 to 60 minutes, then allowed to drain out through a catheter.

• Alternately, the mitomycin can be given on a weekly basis for six weeks. With this regimen, the bladder is filled with mitomycin with a catheter, the solution is left for one to two hours, then the person urinates. A maintenance treatment may be given once per month for up to one year. Side effects — Mitomycin often causes temporary irritation of the bladder, including the need to urinate frequently and urgently and pain with urination. Mitomycin can also cause a skin rash on the palms of the hands, soles of the feet, and genitals. If this rash occurs, treatment with mitomycin is stopped and should not be restarted. A different chemotherapy drug or even BCG might be substituted in this situation. Rarely, mitomycin can cause the bladder to shrink down so that it holds less urine. Intravesical BCG — Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is a live bacterium related to cow tuberculosis. It is a common treatment for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer, particularly for cancers that have a risk of worsening over time. BCG is believed to work by triggering the body's immune system to destroy any cancer cells that remain in the bladder after TURBT. BCG is in a liquid solution that is put into the bladder with a catheter. The person then holds the solution in the bladder for two hours before they urinate. The treatment is usually given once per week for six weeks, starting approximately two to three weeks after the last TURBT. Further booster (maintenance) treatments can extend the benefit of BCG. Benefits of intravesical BCG — Intravesical BCG, in combination with TURBT, is the most effective treatment for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. BCG therapy has been shown to delay (although not necessarily prevent) tumor growth to a more advanced stage, decrease the need for surgical removal of the bladder at a later time, and improve overall survival. Side effects of BCG — Most people who are treated with intravesical BCG have some side effects; the most common of these include the need to urinate frequently, pain with urination, fever, blood in the urine, and body aches. These symptoms usually begin within two to four hours of treatment and resolve within 48 hours. Anyone who develops a fever (temperature greater than 100.4ºF or 38ºC) and drenching night sweats 48 hours or more after treatment with BCG should contact their healthcare provider. These may be signs of less common but more serious side effects, including bodywide infection.

 

TESTING AFTER INITIAL BLADDER CANCER TREATMENT — Tests are usually performed about three months after the start of intravesical treatment to be sure that the cancer has not recurred. If there are no signs of recurrence, maintenance BCG treatment may be recommended. If there are signs of cancer recurrence, any abnormal areas will be biopsied and removed with TURBT. Treatment after TURBT will depend upon the tumor's stage at recurrence and the amount of time that has passed since the first course of BCG was given. In general, there are two options: repeat a six-week course of weekly intravesical BCG or undergo surgical removal of the bladder (cystectomy). Maintenance BCG — Maintenance intravesical BCG treatment is generally recommended for patients with high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. The benefit of maintenance treatment is that it may further delay a recurrence of the cancer. Although the optimal duration of maintenance treatment is debated, several expert groups recommend that it be given for at least one year. Maintenance BCG is given once per week for three weeks at three, six, and 12 months after the initial BCG treatment. In some cases, maintenance BCG will be recommended for an extended period of time (at 18, 24, 30, and 36 months).

 

SURVEILLANCE AFTER BLADDER CANCER TREATMENT — Even in people who are treated appropriately, bladder cancer often recurs. Recurrent cancer can develop anywhere along the urinary tract, including the lining of the kidneys, ureters, urethra, and bladder. Close follow up after treatment is required to monitor for recurrence. Cystoscopy and urine cytology — Repeat cystoscopy and urine cytology testing are recommended for surveillance, beginning three months after treatment ends. If there are no signs of recurrence, cystoscopy and urine testing are usually recommended every three to six months for four years, and then once per year. If there are signs of recurrent bladder cancer, the next step depends upon several factors, including the person's age and underlying medical problems, the tumor's stage and grade at recurrence, previous treatments used, and the amount of time that has passed since the last course of treatment. In general, the options include a second course of intravesical BCG or surgical removal of the bladder (cystectomy). Imaging tests — The upper urinary tract (eg, kidneys, ureters) is lined with the same cells as the bladder. The tumors that develop in the bladder can develop in the upper urinary tract as well. As a result, an imaging test, such as a CT scan, is recommended after the initial course of treatment. This type of test is usually done every one to two years for all patients, except those with very low-risk disease. CT scanning and other types of imaging tests are described separately.

 

WHERE TO GET MORE INFORMATION — Your healthcare provider is the best source of information for questions and concerns related to your medical problem. This article will be updated as needed every four months on our web site (www.uptodate.com/patients). Related topics for patients, as well as selected articles written for healthcare professionals, are also available. Some of the most relevant are listed below. The following organizations also provide reliable health information.

• National Cancer Institute (www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/types/bladder)

• The National Library of Medicine (www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/bladdercancer.html)

• American Society of Clinical Oncology (www.cancer.net/portal/site/patient)

• Raghavan, D, Tuthill, K. Bladder Cancer — A Cleveland Clinic Guide for Patients, Cleveland Clinic Press/Kaplan Press, Cleveland 2008.

• American Cancer Society (www.cancer.org/)

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AJ -- we don't always see eye-to-eye, but under the circumstances, being a little gruff is more than justified. I had something similar with a colonoscopy yesterday (apparently non-cancerous, but we won't know until next week). Good luck, and don't worry if you're BS tolerance is a little low for a while.

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As Cap'n Cahill said so well, "your replies & posts are direct and not born out of a sense of meanness, smart-assedness, or any other negativeness."

 

Jack, if you need to vent, or yell, or get nasty at someone, shoot a PM or email at me.

 

 

 

O holy Father, heavenly Physician of our souls and bodies, who hast sent thine Only-begotten Son our Lord Jesus Christ to heal all our ailments and deliver us from death: do thou visit and heal thy servant, Jack, granting him release from pain and restoration to health and vigor, that he may give thanks unto thee and bless thy holy Name, of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit: now and ever, and unto ages of ages. Amen.

Yep, Subdeacon said it all right there. Thoughts and prayers are with ya pard.

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Yep, Subdeacon said it all right there. Thoughts and prayers are with ya pard.

 

Apology NOT accepted. :angry:

 

 

 

 

 

 

'cause it wasn't needed in the first place. ;)

 

 

 

 

 

Prayers up for a full and speedy recovery.

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O holy Father, heavenly Physician of our souls and bodies, who hast sent thine Only-begotten Son our Lord Jesus Christ to heal all our ailments and deliver us from death: do thou visit and heal thy servant, Jack, granting him release from pain and restoration to health and vigor, that he may give thanks unto thee and bless thy holy Name, of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit: now and ever, and unto ages of ages. Amen.

 

 

I've borrowed SJs prayer and wish you the best as well.

Bucky

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I've borrowed SJs prayer and wish you the best as well.

Bucky

 

I can't take any credit for that prayer, other than passing it along. Its been around for a few hundred years.

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Howdy, AJ -

 

Good thoughts heading your way, pard. One of the things that make the Wire a good place is that there are lots of shoulders to lean on.

 

Regular readers may remember I was dealing with prostate cancer about 3½ years ago. Early detection and good doctors have pretty much assured me that I will die of something (eventually), but it won't be prostate cancer!

 

Keep positive thoughts, and keep us posted.

 

Save your apologies for someone who needs them! ;)

 

Regards, TJH

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Jack, I will keep you in my thoughts during this challenging time for you. Like others, I will also give you quite a bit of leeway and be patient if and when necessary. What I won't do is mollycoddle you. You're going to keep pushing forward, doing what is necessary for your health, and if it comes to a fight, I expect you to dig your spurs in and give it your best. I believe that is the Cowboy Way, correct?

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AJ,

Prayers up for ya, Pard! I'm scheduled for my annual PSA and annual ultrasound on my thyroid. (So-far benign adanomas due to radiation on my thyroid from trying to shrink tonsils and adenoids when I was a kid! That was about 2 years after Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and they didn't realize what they were doing to the thyroid!) Over the last 20 years, no change. But I always sweat these things.

 

I'd always get a second and maybe a third opinion on something as potentially serious as this.

 

Your Pard,

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AJ,

It must be something us New Yorkers have in our blood or something. Two years ago same situation and the doc's put me off for a month as well and everything turned out just great. That water in Gloversville always did taste a bit funny to me. Prayers up and will try to stop by on my next visit to NY. Diamond Curly

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AJ a song just for you. Good Luck, my dad had the same thing 20 yrs. ago and did fine. Medicines have improved 1000% since then.

 

Yes. I love Tim McGraw and know that song well.

 

Every day is precious. Regardless of anything. And we should always live with that extreme appreciation.

 

But how do you guys post these youtube videos right into the posts!?

 

Aunt Jen

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Yes. I love Tim McGraw and know that song well.

 

Every day is precious. Regardless of anything. And we should always live with that extreme appreciation.

 

But how do you guys post these youtube videos right into the posts!?

 

Aunt Jen

 

I had been using the "Insert Media" button, second to the right from the Quote button in the tool bar. But I found that just dropping the URL from Youtube does the job.

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AJ,

It must be something us New Yorkers have in our blood or something. Two years ago same situation and the doc's put me off for a month as well and everything turned out just great. That water in Gloversville always did taste a bit funny to me. Prayers up and will try to stop by on my next visit to NY. Diamond Curly

 

 

LOL! I can't begin to parse out the potential risks I have encountered over the years. Between chemicals at work, and in my hobbies, SMOKING, and who knows what else, but it is what it is. I just can't wait to shine a little pathology "light" on this critter so I know what I

m doing.....

 

Meanwhile, thanks to all for your kind words.

 

AJ

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