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I like to learn from my mistakes


Grizzly Dave

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and mistake made by others.

 

Just sayin.

 

Grizz

 

Well, while you're learnin' just remember, when you are going to do something not so bright, that misery loves company, stupidity demands it! The dumbest things I've done, I've had somebody right near by that should know better!

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OK, here's one that I made at the loading table last year.

 

I load my Rugers load one skip one load four from a loading strip and close the gate, at the time I continued to hold the loading strip while I cocked and lowered the hammer. Well, that one time I let the hammer slip out of my control and it fell onto the empty chamber. The chamber was empty so no harm no foul, but it sure has made me more aware of my loading procedure ever since. Now I am very meticulous about setting the loading strip aside and putting all my attention on the task at hand.

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I think I'll read thru the manuals again as the shooting season gets going again, always good to refresh ones memory not only on the safety rules, but the rules of the game.

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no, so there isn't really a reason that I have to do it that way, just the way I was shown when I started and got into the habit of.

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GD:

 

Review the four rules of gun safety....vary carefullly and with your full attention.

 

Blastmaster

 

Good advice for all of us who enjoy shooting. Especially the one about keeping yer booger hook off the bang switch.

 

Grizz

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Here is a mistake I did when I first started shooting CAS. I was on a stage shooting my first pistol and when I went to holster it I missed my holster and it went straight to the ground. It was like watching sloooooooooow mooooooooooooooo. T.O. told me to always look at the holster to guide it back in. I am glad that the pistol was empty and landed in grass.

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no, so there isn't really a reason that I have to do it that way, just the way I was shown when I started and got into the habit of.

 

No offense, but if you still do it this way, you obviously have not learned from your mistake. Load one, skip one, load four, close the loading gate, then just rotate the cylinder to lock it on the empty chamber. There is no reason to cock it until you are ready to shoot. At least this works for NMV's. Maybe the old ones are different.

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No offense, but if you still do it this way, you obviously have not learned from your mistake. Load one, skip one, load four, close the loading gate, then just rotate the cylinder to lock it on the empty chamber. There is no reason to cock it until you are ready to shoot. At least this works for NMV's. Maybe the old ones are different.

 

It has been awhile since I've handled an NMV, but won't cocking it and lowering the hammer accomplish the same thing? If so, the habit would easily transfer to the SAA and clones. Just a thought.

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It has been awhile since I've handled an NMV, but won't cocking it and lowering the hammer accomplish the same thing? If so, the habit would easily transfer to the SAA and clones. Just a thought.

 

Sure, but why risk cocking a loaded gun if it isn't necessary? I know that if the hammer slips it will fall on an empty chamber, but what if someone forgot to skip that chamber? Since you can just rotate the cylinder into place on the NMV, cocking and lowering the hammer is needlessly introducing the possibility of a mishap however unlikely that it may be.

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Also thanks to Mr Grizz, I try to learn for my mistakes for sure but would much rather learn from others mistakes.

 

Agreed. I find that it is usually cheaper and a lot less painful to learn from others mistakes :).

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No offense, but if you still do it this way, you obviously have not learned from your mistake. Load one, skip one, load four, close the loading gate, then just rotate the cylinder to lock it on the empty chamber. There is no reason to cock it until you are ready to shoot. At least this works for NMV's. Maybe the old ones are different.

I'll offer the benefit of the experience of those who have gone before me in loading a pistol. It has saved me more than a few times.

Ruger: Open the gate, load five, spin the cylinder to check for high primers (even if you have visually done so previously), place the empty cylinder under the hammer, close the gate, wiggle the cylinder to confirm it is locked in place. Of course, Colt shooters must do the cock and release thing, but I know more than a few Colt shooters who also spin their cylinders.

 

I can't tell you how many times a primer has been just high enough to drag a bit, yet I could take it out, look at it, feel of it and not be able to tell that it is funky…except that I spun the cylinder. Better to find it at the loading table than on the firing line where it might completely hang up.

 

Grizz, I'm reminded of what I've always told my kids about the difference in a stupid person and a smart person. A stupid person only learns from their own experience. A smart person learns from their experience AND the experience of others…which means they don't have to make all the mistakes themselves. It appears to me that you're saying the same thing. Thanks for sharing your experience.

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OK, we've rehashed mine enough, now, anyone else have some mistakes they've made they'd care to share and let the rest of us learn from?

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... spin the cylinder to check for high primers (even if you have visually done so previously)...

 

I can't tell you how many times a primer has been just high enough to drag a bit, yet I could take it out, look at it, feel of it and not be able to tell that it is funky…except that I spun the cylinder. Better to find it at the loading table than on the firing line where it might completely hang up.

 

This.

 

I did the load one, skip one, load four, close the gate routine too. Then a high primer bit me on the firing line. Learned from that.

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I'll offer the benefit of the experience of those who have gone before me in loading a pistol. It has saved me more than a few times.

Ruger: Open the gate, load five, spin the cylinder to check for high primers (even if you have visually done so previously), place the empty cylinder under the hammer, close the gate, wiggle the cylinder to confirm it is locked in place. Of course, Colt shooters must do the cock and release thing, but I know more than a few Colt shooters who also spin their cylinders.

 

I can't tell you how many times a primer has been just high enough to drag a bit, yet I could take it out, look at it, feel of it and not be able to tell that it is funky…except that I spun the cylinder. Better to find it at the loading table than on the firing line where it might completely hang up.

 

Grizz, I'm reminded of what I've always told my kids about the difference in a stupid person and a smart person. A stupid person only learns from their own experience. A smart person learns from their experience AND the experience of others…which means they don't have to make all the mistakes themselves. It appears to me that you're saying the same thing. Thanks for sharing your experience.

 

 

Amen to the above. Load 'em up, give 'er a spin, line up the empty chamber and close the gate. Rock into place and double check the empty chamber location. One or two high primers will cure you of doing the load and close method.

 

CR

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T.O. told me to always look at the holster to guide it back in.

 

I also had someone tell me that... early on.

 

Then I had someone else tell me, "While you're standing there staring in that holster you're not moving, you're not doing anything else and seconds are ticking by on that timer. Pick a place for your holsters and wear them there every time, all the time, so you'll know where they are and won't have to look for them. And do the same with your shotgun belt."

 

Learned from that.

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Well, while you're learnin' just remember, when you are going to do something not so bright, that misery loves company, stupidity demands it! The dumbest things I've done, I've had somebody right near by that should know better!

 

And if they hadn't held your beer, you wouldn't have been able to do them! :lol:

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Sure, but why risk cocking a loaded gun if it isn't necessary? I know that if the hammer slips it will fall on an empty chamber, but what if someone forgot to skip that chamber? Since you can just rotate the cylinder into place on the NMV, cocking and lowering the hammer is needlessly introducing the possibility of a mishap however unlikely that it may be.

 

My thinking was that if you are in the same habit for both, it would be less likely to introduce mishaps across the board. I suppose this solution would be more for someone who has and or uses both types of revolver regularly. That is, having one set of habits that transfers from one to the other. I hadn't considered the issue of high primers, though. That is something to consider, I suppose.

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Spin the cylinders and make sure...No high primers? Check

 

Look AND FEEL every cartridge case as I load them into the rifle magazine...No split cases? Check

 

After the guns go back into the cart after a stage - I immediately replenish the shells in my belt...Shotgun loops full? Check

 

When it is my turn to head to the loading table - I check over my personal equipment...Boots tied? Check Holsters still tied down? Earplugs in place? Glasses clean? Check, Check and Check

 

Staging guns...Are my guns laying correctly or facing correctly for pickup? Check

 

Pistols in holsters...Are the hammer lash downs off BEFORE the beep? Check

 

Check the dustcover on the 73...Is it fully retracted already? Check

 

In case I jack a live one out of the rifle...Do I have accessible rounds on my person? Check

 

The position of my hat on my head...Do I need to use the stampede string? Check

 

Positioning my feet...Can I do everything in this position without moving my feet or dancing in place? Check

 

There are nearly infinite numbers of things you can do wrong - but if you mentally checklist yourself, you can, at least, minimize the errors that you make before and after the stage.

 

Now if I could only figure out how to do better during the stage.

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OK, we've rehashed mine enough, now, anyone else have some mistakes they've made they'd care to share and let the rest of us learn from?

 

Shooting high velocity jacketed bullets at steel plate target at SASS distances is not a good idea. A fragment came back and hit me in the gut. When you tell the triage nurse what really happened it turns out they have to report it to the authorities. Even if it was a ricochet and was just a flesh wound.

 

X Ray and tetanus shot - four hours and $400

Snarky Deputy telling you "what was that a .22?" and "good luck with you GSW" - Free

Constant ongoing lectures about firearms safety given to you by your 7 year old - priceless

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Never had an AD till the 1st. time! shot SAA most my life, about 10 years ago got a Ruger OMV for home protection, opened the gate loaded the 5 closed the gate brain farted pulled the hammer to full cock let the hammer down, finger stayed on the trigger like you do with a SAA, transfer bar got pushed just enough to strike a primer and BOOM! Lucky pistol was pointed at the floor at an angle, had to comb over the shag carpet to hide the hole, Dogs came running in looking at me like you dumb A##. Muscle Memory is not always a good thing.

Rafe :FlagAm:

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and mistake made by others.

 

Just sayin.

 

Grizz

 

 

Grizz , if I learned from my mistakes I would be the smartest man alive,,,, If I could remember.

CCBA

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Thanks Grizz,

 

I have colts so no choice but to drop the hammer. I'm always very careful but it's good to have a reminder of what could happen.

As for me I won't have a discussion while at the loading table. One time the loading officer was talking to me and I had a high primer.

So I pulled one from my belt, loaded my guns when I was done I said "where is that bullet?" the loading officer said "You put it back in your gun belt." I wasn't sure so I unloaded my rifle and there it was! After that NO talking loading the guns or when I'm the loading officer. Time for that later.

 

 

 

El Muerto Negro

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Amen to the above. Load 'em up, give 'er a spin, line up the empty chamber and close the gate. Rock into place and double check the empty chamber location. One or two high primers will cure you of doing the load and close method.

 

CR

:FlagAm: Thought I was only one who had noticed the high primer issue. I originally found on my Vaquero the easiest process was was to load, skip, load 4 and close gate. Then rotate cylinder a few degrees by hand to line up empty chamber. With commercially reloaded ammo I twice found, shooting on the clock, high primers which jammed the pistol. As previously mentioned, visually almost impossible to see and even then would not have believed enough to jam cylinder. Now after loading 4 I rotate the cylinder 360 to verify primer clearance, then align empty chamber and close gate. New procedure at loading table has identified high primers several times. Now I reload and clean primer pockets every time I de-prime. No high primers since.

 

SaukValley Sam

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Dogs came running in looking at me like you dumb A##.

 

Amazing how they can do that, isn't it? :lol: :lol:

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:FlagAm: Thought I was only one who had noticed the high primer issue. I originally found on my Vaquero the easiest process was was to load, skip, load 4 and close gate. Then rotate cylinder a few degrees by hand to line up empty chamber. With commercially reloaded ammo I twice found, shooting on the clock, high primers which jammed the pistol. As previously mentioned, visually almost impossible to see and even then would not have believed enough to jam cylinder. Now after loading 4 I rotate the cylinder 360 to verify primer clearance, then align empty chamber and close gate. New procedure at loading table has identified high primers several times. Now I reload and clean primer pockets every time I de-prime. No high primers since.

 

SaukValley Sam

 

I discovered this when the shell plate on my 550 was a little loose and some of the primers did not quite make it home. Bigger problem as a duelist or GF! It's helped me find a couple of more since, and it only takes a second (off the clock), when the alternative is several seconds on the clock. I've had a lot of people explain how careful they are to avoid high primers while reloading, most of them eventually run into one.

 

CR

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I discovered this when the shell plate on my 550 was a little loose and some of the primers did not quite make it home. Bigger problem as a duelist or GF! It's helped me find a couple of more since, and it only takes a second (off the clock), when the alternative is several seconds on the clock. I've had a lot of people explain how careful they are to avoid high primers while reloading, most of them eventually run into one.

 

CR

:FlagAm: Another thread here addresses cruddy primer pockets. My brass since new has been shot with smokeless powder. Was reloaded commercially 3 or 4 times. When I started reloading and cleaning pockets I found a lot of crud in them. I put a paper towel next to the press and after running Lee pocket cleaner on each shell I tapped them on the paper towel. After just a 100 rounds the towel was already covered with curd, looked like a heavy dose of pepper had been shaken on it. I personally believe this is why I was getting high primers from the commercial reloading facility, they must not have been cleaning the pockets. Now I am reloading shells I previously reloaded, still finding some curd in them also. I use Winchester primers and Trail Boss, don't know if that contributes to crud accumulation..

 

SaukValley Sam

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I prefer to learn from others' mistakes.

Especially if there's blood involved. ;)

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