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Spanish Bit Bobb

Traditional New Year's Day...

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Never herd of "Hoppin' John, a pre Civil War dish frum tha Carolina's ta start the New Year.

Dew yew have a Traditional New Year's dish er meal? :unsure:

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I looked it up:

 

Hoppin' John is the Southern United States' version of the rice and beans dish traditional throughout West Africa. It consists of black-eyed peas (or field peas) and rice, with chopped onion and sliced bacon, seasoned with a bit of salt. Some people substitute ham hock or fatback for the conventional bacon; a few use green peppers or vinegar and spices. Smaller than black-eyed peas, field peas are used in the Low Country of South Carolina and Georgia; black-eyed peas are the norm elsewhere.

 

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New Years 1970, Dover, NH, our neighbor treated us to a traditional Suthern New Year's Day dinner. She was from Georgia. I recall the beans and rice, some greens and fatback.

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Black eyed peas, Collord Greens, Cornbread, Sliced tomatoes and onions. Just a little pepper sauce on the greens. Add a big glass of tea (sweet and iced w/lemon). Now boys and girls you have a true Georgia New Years Day meal. You eat the peas for luck and the greens for properity (money).

 

Every one have a happy and safe New Year.. :unsure:

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Well, bean a gud Jerman boy, ve alvays had sauerkraut for New Years. Fer good luck.

Never did say when the good luck was suppose to show up. I have added to the mix over the years, to include Papa Murphy's Cowboy pizza while I am watching feetball, quaffed down with copious amounts of beer. :unsure:

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Thank's Badger...I get it now. Sourkraut must be like Hobblin' John,

iffin' yer startin' out tha New Year, eatin' them meals...anythin else haz got ta be a step up.

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It's basic, but we do the best there can be. If'n we can afford it...this year was a good one so....

 

USDA Prime New York strips from Lobel's of New York, with baked potato (butter, sour cream, bacon, chives, cheddar cheese), Kendall-Jackson Cabernet...and maybe a few other things :FlagAm:

 

Happy New Years y'all ~

 

GG ~ :unsure:

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I looked it up:

 

Hoppin' John is the Southern United States' version of the rice and beans dish traditional throughout West Africa. It consists of black-eyed peas (or field peas) and rice, with chopped onion and sliced bacon, seasoned with a bit of salt. Some people substitute ham hock or fatback for the conventional bacon; a few use green peppers or vinegar and spices. Smaller than black-eyed peas, field peas are used in the Low Country of South Carolina and Georgia; black-eyed peas are the norm elsewhere.

 

============================

New Years 1970, Dover, NH, our neighbor treated us to a traditional Suthern New Year's Day dinner. She was from Georgia. I recall the beans and rice, some greens and fatback.

 

And it is sooo good.

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At my mother in laws house it's Lasagna and seafood lasagna, good stuff.

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Don't forget the "Confederate Caviar."

 

Blackeyed Peas - 2 cans

Red Bell Pepper - 1 medium chopped fine

White or Yellow Onion - 1 medium chopped fine

Green Onions - 1 bunch chopped fine

Salt and Pepper to taste

a few drops of Pepper Sauce

Italian Salad Dressing - 1 12 oz bottle (that is a cheat, you could do the vinegar, oil, herbs and spices, but this is less expensive and just as good. Best is the Wishbone Tuscan style)

 

OPTIONAL:

 

One or two Jalapeno Peppers, seeded and chopped very fine.

 

 

Mix everything. Let sit about an hour, but can sit for several days, serve with corn chips, or flour tortillas. Or just as a side on a plate.

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