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Savvy Jack

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Savvy Jack last won the day on September 2 2018

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About Savvy Jack

  • Birthday 11/10/1966

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    https://www.44-40wcf.com

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    Hickory, NC
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    https://www.44-40wcf.com

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  1. Yeap they can handle it I guess, good thing 44-40 High Pressure loads are no where near those pressures but still high enough to not be pleasant.
  2. Yeap, exactly....and is exactly what I plan on.!
  3. I still have my 94' 30-30 made in 59'
  4. I'd sure like to know how the Canadians like/d their Winchester 94's chambered for 44-40, an original mid-range rifle cartridge suitable for revolvers.
  5. I wonder if they will ever chamber it in 44-40.....I would buy one quick! http://www.ubertireplicas.com/product/1894-carabine-and-rifle/
  6. 38's are the easiest to load and more plentiful thus why they are so popular. But you will need small pistol primers me thinks
  7. If you can slug your barrel first, then get whatever is about .001 over the bore measurement but if not, try and stick to a .428 or less. For the ease of reloading get Lee dies, they work good with the .428 or less and RCBS Cowboy dies work better for .429/.430's. There may be some more great dies out there but those are probably the more reasonably priced and should work just fine. If you are going to purchase from Midway, they only lists one .428" and I would suggest trying a few first before you buy any other design to make sure you like them. It is of the Magma design and a roll crimp will work fine or you can get the LFCD and work with it till you get the crimp you want if you dont like the roll crimp. After you get the hang of loading these, then venture out from there, i.e. Big Lube, 427098, Lee bullets etc., you won't regret it.
  8. Thats Awesome Razor, just awesome!!! For CAS, these guys can give you some great Unique loads. About 7gr with a 200gr lead bullet should keep it well whiten limits and below 1,000fps in a rifle. Keeps the splatter down-range, and the pressures well under 8,000psi. Just keep an eye on every charge dropped!!! An accidental triple charge of 6gr (18gr) will fill the case up enough to seat a 200gr Magma with a little compression....it will blow everything up with an ungodly amount of pressure. A double charge of 7gr (14gr) will hurt really bad so be extremely careful when you load this powder. Any time your mind in concentrating on setting up new loads etc, it's easy to get distracted. Just a 12gr load produces 21,786psi and is the highest charge I have ever tested and will probably hurt a revolver pretty good.
  9. Yes, I have that program and it is not very accurate for the 44-40. Since there can not be a conversion forumula, we can not compare those psi results to those CUP or "PSI" results from our handloading manuals. The results are in psi but using the (CIP) method, not the piezio method (PSI) The two modern standardized test methodologies - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Small_arms_ammunition_pressure_testing CIP - is the psi result using the Permanent International Commission for the Proof of Small Arms testing method. Testing "sensor" is placed in front of the cartridge. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commission_internationale_permanente_pour_l’épreuve_des_armes_à_feu_portatives PSI - is the psi result from what is commonly refereed to as the Piezoelectric method. Testing "sensor" is placed on top of the cartridge. https://www.pcb.com/sensors-for-test-measurement/pressure-transducers/ballistic CUP - is the psi result from using the Copper of Units of Measure method. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copper_units_of_pressure Although "psi" is always the end result, we typically see the "abbreviation" used defined by the method used such as 11,000psi (Piezo MAX), 13,000psi (CUP MAX) and 15,954 (CIP MAX) for the 44-40. There is no correlation...magic formula...to convert from one to another. The Pressures recorded are all in PSI but using different methods. Much handloading data has been simply "forwarded" through the years rather than actually being tested again and again and again for the 44-40. Hercules 1995 dated data using a 240gr lead bullet and Reloder 7 shows the results as 12,100 CUP while updated Alliant 2005 data shows 12,100 psi but also notes..and I quote...."chamber pressures in copper units". This is where folks can get confused or mis-lead. I see this a lot, especially on the Hodgdon handload data website in regards to the 44-40 data.
  10. " The 44-40 is capable of excellent performance when loaded properly for handgun use. If, however, one endeavors to combine loading for both handgun and rifle in this caliber, he is destined to meet with only mediocre success. As in all other dual-purpose cartridges, the factory loads are only a compromise at best. Smokeless-powder loading for handguns requires a much more rapid-burning type than loading for rifle use, as the short barrel must burn all the powder if satisfactory results are to be achieved. In addition, rifle cartridges can be loaded to a pressure of about 30,000 pounds in this caliber, whereas the same load in a revolver would be more or less disastrous." I also wanted to comment, did any English scholars out there notice the content that this was written? Although I am no scholar, this is written in a way that leads one to believe he is explaining that the 44-40 rifle loading has always been the lead role during that time-frame and that people were having issues with loading the revolvers, 100% reverse than is done today. Today, it is the revolver that is the lead role with pistol powders and the rifle loads that have mediocre success. Hypothetically, lets change the wording... " The 44-40 rifle is capable of excellent performance when loaded properly for rifle use. If, however, one endeavors to combine loading for both handgun and rifle in this caliber, he is destined to meet with only mediocre success. As in all other dual-purpose cartridges, the factory loads are only a compromise at best. Smokeless-powder loading for rifles requires a bit slower-burning type than faster-burning loading for revolver use, as the longer barrel allows more time for the slower burning rifle powders to burn enough powder if satisfactory lower chamber pressure results and original 1,300fps or greater [1,500fps] velocities are to be achieved. In addition, revolver cartridges can be loaded to a pressure of only about 11,000 psi in this caliber, whereas the same load in a rifle can be more or less favorably closer to 14,000psi for weaker action rifles and closer to 18,000 psi. for stronger action rifles."
  11. I hate it when folks say that to other folks. Actually there is not that much information out there for the 44-40 in MODERN handloading manuals. There are several selections of powder but only three bullets of which one is discontinued, one is the 427666 and the 427098. However, manuals and books are important for several reasons. One is to learn the "pressures" related to the loads given, pressures for size bullet used, and to even learn a little history. You would not believe the grief I have received over the years by loading the 44-40 "hot" as did Winchester factory loads for the Winchester 92' and Marlin 1894 types. This is nothing new, been around for many years....especially since the 1930's. Sharp once wrote in his 1937 handloading manual... " The 44-40 is capable of excellent performance when loaded properly for handgun use. If, however, one endeavors to combine loading for both handgun and rifle in this caliber, he is destined to meet with only mediocre success. As in all other dual-purpose cartridges, the factory loads are only a compromise at best. Smokeless-powder loading for handguns requires a much more rapid-burning type than loading for rifle use, as the short barrel must burn all the powder if satisfactory results are to be achieved. In addition, rifle cartridges can be loaded to a pressure of about 30,000 pounds in this caliber, whereas the same load in a revolver would be more or less disastrous." Thus the reason for modern mediocre factory loads using pistol powders. I do load my rifle powder cartridges in my revolvers but like Sharpe explained, velocity is compromised and results are notabley slower than when using pistol powders. By the same token, using pistol powders in rifles creates less velocities at greater pressures than when using the appropriate rifle powders.. He goes on to continue and explains that a wide range of bullets are available but one must slug his barrel and measure the slug carefully. I know this is CAS and not a hunting forum but it is really important to understand what and why we do what we do......especially with the multifaceted 44-40! A great source of information is from GunsMagazine November 2003, page 61 from Taffin. Please not below the writing in the red and yellow boxes. Also note that the 200gr Lyman "Cowboy" is the 427666 and the Oregon Trail 200gr is cast from commercial molds from Magma Engineering. This is where I get the name 44-40 "Magma" bullets.
  12. Yeah, all seem high but hoped that would give him a good idea of what was out there as far as selection. Always purchased my powder in group buys locally.
  13. I know right? lol I do sometimes enjoy walking around and looking at stuff in the gun shows but I finally stopped going every year. Same basic "dealers" selling the same basic stuff. I have scored on a few items as well as purchasing a Cobra Derringer in 38 spl once, but noting related to the 44-40 stuff.
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